Working with co-author Kurt Bruner, a Texas pastor, he's out with "Fatherless," the first of a dystopian trilogy that looks into the future when the elderly outnumber the young, advancing the culture wars to new dimensions.

Dobson, 76, answered emailed questions from Religion News Service about his new project.

Some answers have been edited for length and clarity.

Q: Why did you venture into fiction after writing about real-life parenting for so long?

A: This is my first novel, but not my first foray into fiction. I have always believed in the power of narratives to influence thought and shape the spiritual imagination. While with Focus on the Family I challenged the team to create a radio drama series called "Adventures in Odyssey." My co-author, Kurt Bruner, led that team for several years. We couldn't be more excited about the potential of this new trilogy to embody themes on which I have been writing, speaking and broadcasting for decades.

Q: With a plot that includes parents of more than two children being dubbed "breeders," does "Fatherless" depict your worst nightmares?

A: Actually, that term is already being used in some circles today to disparage those who consider children a blessing rather than a burden. As we said in the prologue, a happy home is the highest expression of God's image on earth. Marriage and parenthood echo heaven, something hell can't abide. In 1977 I founded what became a worldwide ministry dedicated to the preservation of the home. That effort placed me in one cultural skirmish after another, unwittingly confronting forces much darker than I knew. I don't pretend to comprehend what occurs in the unseen realm. But I know that we all live in what C.S. Lewis called "enemy-occupied territory."