Speaking about the report, religious expert Tim Jensen from the University of Southern Denmark said, “Danes may see the blasphemy law as helping integration because it promotes the acceptance of a multicultural and multi-faith society. But it can also be problematic if it reflects a belief that the feelings of religious people have a special status and require special protection,” the Berlingske news agency reports.

Meanwhile, Jacob Mchangama, legal affairs director for CEPOS, said, “Blasphemy laws legitimise a culture of offence that leads to violence and dissatisfaction in parts of the world. If Denmark is to have credibility when we criticise blasphemy laws in Pakistan, for example, or we act in disbelief toward people that react violently to a film on YouTube that is critical of Islam, then we have to repeal our own blasphemy law,” the Copenhagen Post reports.