The 16-year-old said she accepted the prize in the historic Knights’ Hall in The Hague “on behalf of all of the children in the world who are trying to go to school, and all of those parents who are overcoming fear and intimidation — or cultural opposition — to give their sons and daughters the chance of an education.”

Malala was 15 when she and two of her friends were attacked on their way home from school in Pakistan’s northwest Swat Valley. She survived a gunshot wound to her head and now attends school in England after being flown there for treatment.

She harked back to the attack that turned her into a household name in her emotional acceptance speech.

“In my home country of Pakistan, the Taliban uses terror to try and stop girls going to school,” she said. “I was just one target for their violence. There are many others whose names are not known. It is for them that we must continue our campaign to ensure that all children in the world have the chance to go to school.”