Driving Religiously

Sep 25, 2012


Discussion by: Rosbif
Has anyone considered the similarities between driving and religion in our culture?
To some, driving is almost a religion and it is possible to afford oneself rights and privileges above the law because of a belief in the way we should be allowed to drive … I mean us personally, not the rest of you of course.
Here are a few examples ……

Driving/Religion similarities:

  • Everyone
    has their own personal interpretation of driving.
  • Everyone
    thinks it is their right to drive.
  • Sunday is
    considered a special day for some driving cultures.
  • Drivers are offended by criticism.
  • Extremists
    can be violent against those who don’t drive like them.
  • When stopped by police, drivers
    pretend to be the victims of oppression rather than the perpetrators of illegal
    acts.
  • Normally nice people can be unreasonable and violent due to their driving.
  • There are
    TV programs that relentlessly promote driving despite the damage it causes the
    planet.
  • The government
    supports it with hardly any restrictions against the interests of the people as
    long as there is money to be made.
  • Drivers
    will support the cause of other drivers even those who drive differently in
    preference to those who try to restrict driving.
  • Drivers try
    to avoid responsibilities for their acts.
  • The more money you have the closer you can get to driving nirvana.

Driving/Religion differences:

  • Drivers
    have insurance against the damage they cause.
  • Drivers are
    taxed.
  • You can be
    a Shiite driver and go out on a Sunni day … sorry .. couldn’t resist that one.

8 comments on “Driving Religiously

  • there is lot of things what is similar to religion if we think it deeper, but for each it something different, for myself religion is very similar to poker



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  •  Poker?

    Please expand. I play a lot of poker and I tend to base it on reason, use facts were known, stay calm, ignore insulting comments if I suck out, apologize to other player for bad beats and respect everyone at the table.

    I would be interested to read your list of similarities.



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  •  I would equate Islamists as children in front of a driving video game; when the vehicle doesn’t do what they want they shout at the TV and throw the controller to the floor. I can’t be them …. it must be the game that’s wrong!



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  • 5
    CdnMacAtheist says:

    As a driver who is totally non-religious, here’s my take on this OP.   😎
    Driving / Religious differences:

    1  Drivers need insurance against damage they cause, and
    their Clubs don’t protect, hide or transfer them.

    2  Drivers are taxed, tested and have restrictions, and can be fined, suspended,
    banned & jailed.

    3  Drivers don’t have to travel based on faith, and
    their actions always follow scientific laws.

    4  If a driver hurts someone, they are equally punished by
    standard rules of local law.

    5  If drivers die, they don’t get reincarnated, or go on to any infinite heaven or hell existence.

    6  Driving Instructors have to be qualified and licensed to
    modern community standards.

    7  If a driver teaches another, the novice must pass standard
    tests before being allowed to drive in public.
    8  Drivers don’t have to follow any strange calendar, clothing, sexual or
    dietary restrictions.

    9  Drivers don’t have to attend specific Clubs, wear Club
    symbols, or have any body parts removed.

    10 Drivers don’t have to grow
    funny hair or wear daft headgear dictated by their Driving Club.

    11 Drivers don’t believe their Club must take over all other Clubs
    by indoctrination, war, terror or fear.

    12 Drivers don’t gang up and run other drivers off the road, or
    deliberately kill them.

    13 Driving Clubs don’t invade other Clubs, killing, looting &
    raping the Club members.

    14 Female Drivers are treated equally, and don’t have to have a male passenger along with them.
    15 Drivers don’t have to worship a fabled Ultimate Driving Hero, who could do no wrong.
    16 Driving Clubs don’t get to have their own laws, or their own courts and punishments.
    17 Drivers and their Clubs don’t have the right not to be offended or mocked, even by non-drivers.
    18 Drivers who move to other countries must learn and follow that country’s rules of behavior.
    19 Underage driving is not required, or taught in schools until the children are of a responsible age.
    20 Non-drivers are not denigrated, ostracized, punished, killed or prevented from living a good life.
    21 Drivers have to get medical and vision tests to see if they are fit to operate out among the public.
    22 Drivers don’t normally move around in 2,000 year old vehicles totally unfit for modern travel.
    23 Drivers need to keep up-to-date on the road rules, not ones from the desert around the year 0.
    Etc, etc….



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  •  Haha! Agreed, I wasn’t actually considering drivers as the immoral scheisters the religinuts tend to be but rather I was comparing some of the human psychological affects of driving which are also used by religions.

    I’m a biker and you wouldn’t believe how many drivers would prefer to believe that I can actually apperate rather than accept that they don’t use mirrors correctly…. “He just appeared out of no where ….” is the oft heard defense.
    The thought of this post merely struck me as I was on my way through the traffic observing the many phone users who can on the one hand admit using a phone is dangerous, but at the same time they of course, are careful when on the phone, observing the many who read the paper in their car in the morning or even those who seem to believe that other traffic would surely be marked on their GPS so as long as they have their eyes on the screen, all’s well.



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  • by the title I was expecting something like letting go of the steering wheel and knowing you’ll get to your destination on faith.



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