I’m a16 year old and i do not want to be “force fed” theistic beliefs

Mar 5, 2013


Discussion by: tim2142
Recently my parents have started taking me to a baptist church and forcing me to accept this new concept of an omniscient omnipotent being which cannot be proven to exist, and I’m not trying to start any arguments but, i immediately turned to my father (the more logical parent) and said this is complete and utter horse shite he couldn’t prove gods existence but felt it necessary for me to adopt these ideas as my own. I know that they’re my parents and i should listen to their instructions but i feel as though if i choose think for myself, my parents will disown me
any advice would help and thank you for reading this

37 comments on “I’m a16 year old and i do not want to be “force fed” theistic beliefs

  • 1
    whiteraven says:

    “Complete and utter horse shit”… Lousy way to start an argument but a great way to start a fight.

    You could pretend to swallow and spit it out later when no one’s watching. I had a cousin who did something like that; pieces of desicated meat would turn up in the strangest places.



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  • 2
    LEL4190 says:

    I’ve just said my parents that I don’t believe in god. They didn’t have no other options, but to accept it. I tell you one thing. You know your parents better than us so it is up to you to make them accept your beliefs. And another thing. Even if they don’t appreciate it don’t give up. If you will try to cheat your thoughts it could be bad for you. Make clear to them that even if you’re an atheist you’re still the same guy. Good luck.



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  • 3
    the_mad_humanist says:

    I would keep quiet and do the following:

    1.) Study the bible and take notes of issues you have with it.

    2.) Study the Euthyphro dialogue (http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Trial-Death-Socrates-Dialogues/dp/0486270661/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1362471574&sr=8-1) and notice how Socrates unravels a religious argument whilst appearing to agree with it. Be warned that Socrates was still executed for following his conscience in the end.

    The really important thing is to realize that you can be honest with yourself about what you think. Noone can control what happens inside your head. But discussing these things with those around you is about timing and making sure you are intellectually prepared.



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  • 4
    susanlatimer says:

    Angry_liberal has given you the best advice I can think of.

    Take it seriously. Be polite. Be inquisitive Be charitable. Ask questions.

    All using the exact recipe that angry_liberal has given you.

    You will find your way from there.



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  • 5
    Uriel-238 says:

    You’re sixteen and they recently decided to do this? That kinda raises the question of what kind of Sunday / Church activities you’ve been expected to do to this point. It would be downright cruel of them to force you to suddenly change your faith or faith-based activities this late in your upbringing. Is this change due to a recent marriage or something?

    When parents choose to change religions, it can be difficult for the kids, especially if the parents expect the kids to convert as well. It’s downright inappropriate, though it is not uncommon.

    If it’s truly impossible to tolerate, you could consider looking at sympathetic extended families (aunts, uncles, whoever) who might be willing to take you in, especially if it’s clear that your parents no longer have your interests at heart. In a worst case scenario, get yourself emancipated and leave.

    If you have incentive to stay (say, they’re otherwise taking decent care of you, or will support you through college) then it’s a matter of toeing the line until you are out out on your own. Regard it as a job and part of the cost of survival. But in the meantime, get yourself a support network, whether it is the local atheist community, a handful of sympathetic friends or support groups for kids in abusive homes. That is what’s going to hold you together while you sit tight.



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  • 7
    Alan4discussion says:

    I would suggest you read the “Magic of Reality” if you have not already done so. It has a nice simple, easy to understand, take on gods, and answers to various theist claims.

    Rather than challenging your parents with their claims based on “utter horse shite”, this would move their position to trying to explain why their version of “utter horse shite”, is better than that of other cultures.



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  • I went to boarding school and it was compulsory to attend chapel 2 times during the week and on Sunday. I just sat when we were supposed to sit, stood when we were supposed to stand but I conspicuously didn’t sing or pray during that time. Best part was that the headmaster could see me doing this from where he was seated on the side, but he could hardly object to me exercising my beliefs or lack thereof. When I was entering the 6th form I was a candidate for becoming a prefect and was interviewed by the headmaster and asked about this and I stated flat out I didn’t believe in god. I don’t know if it was why I didn’t become a prefect but I wouldn’t be surprised if it played a part.

    Anyway I cannot say what the best course of action for someone else would be, but politely attending but not participating might be one option. It’s probably best to not get into arguments over it however.



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  • 9
    brighterstill says:

    Think about the best possible future for yourself- it might not include getting disowned at 16. I would suggest just going along with the church thing, maybe cleverly seeding doubt in those at the church to make them think a bit. There’s no Atheist god who gets angry when you lie about that stuff- just tell them you love going to church: they’re used to comforting lies.



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  • 10
    QuestioningKat says:

    Do you mean that you have not regularly been to church before this time? Ask them why they suddenly feel the need to take you to church. Listen and do not respond. Ask them what they will do to you if you refuse to go? Listen and do not respond at all – at all. Ask only questions- don’t slip up.(If you do, do not yell under any circumstances. Speak calmly) If they ask a question, ask a question back. This would be a good way of getting some feedback to see what’s really going on. Church is a bore and no one should have to deal with it if they do not want to. Why Baptist? Why not Unitarian?

    My guess is that this is going on because you have displayed normal teenage spreading of the wings. All kids do this and it is normal. They don’t like it because this is their house and they don’t want to bend their ways to someone else trying to tell them what to do.They may also think your making bad decisions in some area of your life. Understand this is their position, but you have an important task before yourself also – to become independent and able to flourish on your own.

    If the consequences of you not following their requests sound unlivable (They will kick you out of the house at 18, They will not pay for your college, etc.) Start looking for a support network of friends (good quality friends I assume you know the difference.) and then compromise using your time wisely. Suggest the Unitarian Church instead. Suggest taking a Bible study course at a non-religious environment. (You do not want to argue the Bible with someone who really knows it better than you do.)Use this time to learn. Make the internet your best support for knowledge.



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  • 11
    Pauly01 says:

    I don’t think they’ll disown you. My advice in these situations is to pay it the bare amount of lip service just so your parents can tolerate it. And when you get independent and you will hopefully , throw it all right out the door. It is horseshit , your bang on there.

    To give you a bit about my background , I went to get training once as a facilitator for a 12 step program. I thought there was some kind of purpose to my life , that I had to somehow help people because it was divinely dictated. You see I’m a natural skeptic , group ideology and politics never sat right with me. But as a last ditched measure to try and identify with some kind of God and meaning I indulged in this. What a disaster! People sitting around a circle joining hands and praying was just creepy and sick , a complete abandonment of self and of individual thought. These people were Gumbas and the funny thing is I doubted myself because I felt this way. I thought I had to adapt or assimilate with these people , this was the way life was. How wrong I was.

    Always think for yourself.



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  • 12
    Matrix7 says:

    As an alternative, simply and calmly tell your parents that you have reached your conclusions about the non-existence of gods through your own entirely convincing reasoning based on the available evidence, and there is absolutely nothing they can do to convince you otherwise. Emphasise the fact that their efforts are futile and doomed to failure, so they should not waste their time and effort by forcing you to attend religious services.

    If they insist that you attend church services, take along a book to read so as to do something useful with the time. Something like Richard Dawkins’ “The God Delusion” would be a good choice. Make sure you read it very publicly in church.

    I don’t believe they’d be unwise enough to insist you attend more than one church service in that case.



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  • 13
    phil rimmer says:

    The very great majority of parents have three overriding concerns for their kids, that they are safe, that they are happy, and that they reflect well on themselves. This latter is the only selfish one, but can come with useful side effects. In grooming you to be socially acceptable to their friends they will also be leading you towards the general social graces and moralities of consideration for and investment in others around you.

    First you should reassure them about these concerns whenever you can. Don’t wait for them to raise issues. Where you can (if any of the following applies) reassure them that you will act safely, that you feel fulfilled and engaged in the world around you and that acting morally is one of the key reasons for questioning religious dogma. (This happens to be my primary reason for actively pursuing atheism.)

    I have proposed this latter as a strategy to a couple of teenagers. By being actively interested in making better moral decisions, having a broader understanding of harms in the world, their parents came to feel not the specific failure but rather a general success.

    Most religious have a poor understanding of their own dogma but take following it as a self-assurance of their own moral goodness. Most moderate believers are into God because of the Good they mistakenly think is irrevocably attached to it.

    Most important, if they are simply Good people rather more than God people, try not to be too disappointed in them. And understand discussions will be more effective if not treated as make or break battles. You can stop any discussion if its getting too heavy. “Hmm interesting, I need to think about that.” and walk away. Suggest something they might consider also. “Enjoy” your discussions whilst respectfully disagreeing. You will have plenty of chances to re-present your ideas. Find and celebrate common ground.

    The biggest problem I have as a parent of teenagers is when they don’t talk. Talking is always better than a pissed-off sulky silence.



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  • 15
    papa lazaru says:

    Church is super-boring. And religious studies, don’t get me started.

    That’s pretty much the only thing that bothered me. Getting bored out of my head, and not giving the tiniest shit about their nonsense. I didn’t ‘rebel’ against it as such, I hate plenty on my plate already. But it’s something that might be fun to do. You’re 16, you’re suppose to do that anyway.



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  • 16
    DocWebster says:

    I’ve seen this before with children who have parents that come in to the Jehovah’s Witless’. The kids are hapless victims of their parents stupidity and get the full force of the charms of the elders with “counseling” while having to endure the ravings of the freshly blinded at home. I’ve heard of a couple of suicide attempts which usually results in more of what drove the poor kids over the edge in the first place. The daughter of an old boss of mine was resistant to being fed bullshit in church so he sent her off to a private school, which was more like a prison, to get all of the resistance beat out of her. When she came back after “graduation” she was an automaton, spouting christian platitudes like a good little girl.



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  • 17
    jantina.decologne says:

    I understand your problem. Ofcourse: parents are not the owners of their children. When children are very little, parents have to make choiches for them. But you are 16 and recently your parents have started taking you to a church? I’m a christian, but I think that your parents make a mistake if they force you to go to church. But if you have to do what they want, I have an advice for you. Try to see this as a sort of ‘edication’. You are atheist. In future you’ll a lot discuss about religion/atheism, and is good to know what the other think. Before you want to be a rabbit-hunter, you have to know what a rabbit is… And for the rabbit its important to know what a hunter is. So: if your parents you force to go to church, use your visits to the church as a hunter. Or as the hunted rabbit…



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  • 18
    TruthSeeker says:

    Doesnt seem the brightest way of questioning the parents .

    Why don’t you ask
    1. what is the entire process of religion for?
    2. What’s is the use of it for society and in turn me?
    3. How can i use this thing for my own benefit?

    All things are there for a reason , they may be true or Bull Shit . Point is what is its use to you and the society. If Church means you can bond well with family , get more simpleton friends then i guess you got something.

    Point is whats it use to you , judge that with your situation and see if its worth the benefit.



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  • Your getting it easy with the church thing. As an ex Irish catholic my siblings and I were dragged every Sunday to Mass since the day we were born, just like every other family in Ireland. When I turned your age, cute girls caught my interest and not the boring crap the parish priest spewed out. I stopped going when I turned 19, I couldn’t listen to the same dribble anymore.
    Here’s an idea, try going the Frankenstein route- pretend you’ve turned super religious with your parents. Sit them down and have little chats about god and anything to do with religion. Insist they do whatever baptist church stuff with you but do things to the extreme with them. They might decide it was a bad idea after all, if not you might have to suck it up till you finish college. Then you’ll be free. Best of luck.



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  • 20
    Simon Tuffen says:

    The fact that you recognise the whole thing as “horse shite” is the most important thing.

    If you’re forced to go to church now it won’t last forever, you’ll soon be able to make your own choices.

    I went to a private school with 2 or 3 church services a week. Belief in the religion was not forced upon anyone, although we had to attend the services. It’s wrong to force people to go but there’s not much you can do about it until you’re an adult. Many people face much greater hardships in life, so bide your time for now and when you’re older you will have ample opportunities to campaign against this nonsense. In the near future, you will have the time and the ability to do far more damage to attempts at religious indoctrination than any mild inconvenience you have suffered sitting through a few sermons.



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  • 21
    sminhinnick says:

    You could go to church, complying with your parent’s wishes, but keep asking difficult questions until you get kicked out. The Skeptics Annotated Bible is a valuable resource for this – http://skepticsannotatedbible.com/

    There are also many atheist web sites with good people who will support you. Make use of them, and keep us posted.



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  • 22
    whiteraven says:

    You might find the story of a high school student from Rhode Island inspiring as well as cautionary: Jessica Ahlquist speaking at a Freedom From Religion Foundation award presentation (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aunCXVFoJUU} as well as her bio info at wikipedia and numerous web citations. She stuck her neck out over a 1st Amendment issue, had her family’s support, but suffered extensive harassment.

    I guess my point is to be cautious of endangering your means of support and of becoming isolated or persecuted with no place to go.



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  • 23
    OHooligan says:

    Lots of interesting suggestions. But I can’t agree with the ones that suggest you actually waste any time studying this stuff. Bible Studies FFS! Gimme a break!. Perhaps ignoring it until it goes away will work, depends. Certainly don’t waste a single brain cell on it. If you can discretely plug in an earphone and listen to your favorite sounds during enforced periods in the church or whatever, that might help. (Try not to sing along, or tap your feet…)

    If you’re given this stuff to study, be a slacker, get an F.

    I suppose Passive Resistance is what I’m promoting. Be polite about it. If questioned, you can just be dumb: It’s all so complicated, it doesn’t make sense, I don’t understand.

    And for good measure, if pushed, no harm in pushing back a little: “I don’t believe you understand this stuff either.”

    Or if it’s a matter of Taking Jesus Into Your Heart, well,that’s such a highly personal thing that you can probably get away with Not Being Ready, and see if you can get them to lay off on the grounds that they shouldn’t destroy whatever potential for faith you might develop in the future, but not if they force this stuff upon you against your will, that would be bound to turn you into a Satanist, or worse, an Atheist…..

    Maybe they’ll have the good sense to back off and let you find your own way. They could pray for you, that would occupy some of their time and leave you out of it.

    However it goes, good luck. Hang in there. Suddenly it will all be over and you’ll be your own free self. Just a few more years at worst. I know, they’re the longest ones, but really, suddenly they’ll be over.



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  • Most people attending church don’t really pay attention. They are just into the rhythm of the chanting and the ritual. I have found that many atheist actually pay attention to what is said and find it as it is: gross and senseless.

    In this conflict you can act like you did and openly and clearly reject to participate on the ceremony. There is other method and it is to attend politely and take notice of all the ritual and nonsense going on. Try to stay away from it and don’t comment or praise it, just stay silent. After a while there will be obvious that you are over it and it will be abandoned. There is a risk and that is that some cleric will notice that and will try to single you and expose your lack of interest. Again, you can state you are respectful and that you are learning a lot about the experience. If you are confrontational they may use it against you.

    Whatever you do, is your responsibility and shapes you. Just be aware that learning to cope with conflicts is something that will be extremely important in your life. Even harder, how to deal to conflicts and remain true to your values. But, hey, that is a life’s work.



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  • 25
    Homo antitheist says:

    Go outback gather a bunch of stones, tell them what they’re doing is horse shit again and then read them deuteronomy 21:18-21.



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  • I was raised in a fundamentalist church (Church of Christ). When I was about your age I realized the bible was not literally true and over time I lost interest in religion. My mother was very religious and I didn’t want to hurt her, so I went thru the motions. I decided to make church attendance interesting instead of boring. I started paying attention to the sermons with the intent of tearing them apart mentally. It worked, I read the Bible more and the more I read the weaker my belief in God became.
    When I was 20 I left home and no longer attended church. I learned about evolution and no longer required a god for any reason.
    I am 80 now and the 4 years that I went to church after I was no longer a believer represent a small percentage of my life.
    My advice, hang in and slowly let the changes be known.



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  • 27
    Aussie says:

    Ask your parents if they have read Dan Brown’s “The Da Vinci Code”

    Ask your parents if they believe that the Bible is the word of God

    Ask your parents if they have read the Bible through in its entirety

    If they have not done so ask them why they have preferred to read Dan Brown’s book in preference to God’s book

    Ask your parents to explain why God saw fit to have 42 children torn apart by two bears as an appropriate punishment for them taunting Elisha about his bald head:

    II Kings 2:

    2:22 So the waters were healed unto this day, according to the saying of Elisha which he spake.
    2:23 And he went up from thence unto Bethel: and as he was going up by the way, there came forth little children out of the city, and mocked him, and said unto him, Go up, thou bald head; go up, thou bald head.
    2:24 And he turned back, and looked on them, and cursed them in the name of the LORD. And there came forth two she bears out of the wood, and tare forty and two children of them.



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  • 28
    OHooligan says:

    In reply to #27 by Aussie:

    Ask your parents if they have read Dan Brown’s “The Da Vinci Code”

    Ask your parents if they believe that the Bible is the word of God

    Ask your parents if they have read the Bible through in its entirety

    If they have not done so ask them why they have preferred to read Dan Brown’s book in preference to God’s book

    Ask your parents to explain why God saw fit to have 42 children torn apart by two bears as an appropriate punishment for them taunting Elisha about his bald head:

    II Kings 2:

    2:22 So the waters were healed unto this day, according to the saying of Elisha which he spake.
    2:23 And he went up from thence unto Bethel: and as he was going up by the way, there came forth little children out of the city, and mocked him, and said unto him, Go up, thou bald head; go up, thou bald head.
    2:24 And he turned back, and looked on them, and cursed them in the name of the LORD. And there came forth two she bears out of the wood, and tare forty and two children of them.

    What? Some kids dissed a bald guy then he yelled abuse back at them and then a couple of bears turned up and set about the kids.

    I take it this document was the equivalent of the local newspaper, a bear attack that killed 42 kids would be something people would want to be warned about.

    Does the story tell if the bald guy got blamed for the bear attack, and punished, or did he just retell the tale himself and claim credit by way of boasting about his mighty powers of cussing? Maybe to dissuade others from calling him baldy? If so, he sounds like one nasty bald motherf***er.



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  • 29
    Alan4discussion says:

    @OP – Recently my parents have started taking me to a baptist church and forcing me to accept this new concept of an omniscient omnipotent being which cannot be proven to exist, and I’m not trying to start any arguments but, i immediately turned to my father (the more logical parent) … ..

    We have just been discussing the history of this god on another thread.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlnnWbkMlbg

    Perhaps your father would benefit from 15 minutes viewing some history.



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  • 30
    Unbiased Bias says:

    I’m 18 but still live under my parents household. They are Christians of the denomination baptist like you but because I am under their household I still need to abide by their rules. If church on Sundays is something you gotta do big friggin deal. It’s not like your being tortured to death. Think of it as an opportunity to understand why people listen and follow this religion. Understand the enemy. If you want to disprove the biblical record then use the bible itself. Also according to my understanding of biblical Christianity nobody can force you to accept an all powerful being. I have the unique perspective of being in the world of indifference to theism and then a drastic change to theism ( that is of my parents ). The change to theism has actually made the household I live in more stable with absolute rules not based on a reflection of societies standards that changes but a biblical one. Even if the bible is not the inspired word of god it still can be used for a foundation of growth. There needs to be an absolute. Relativism just doesn’t cut it. Another thing to consider is what will you believe? It’s easy to attack something without providing the basis for you attack. Everyone has a worldview even if its an anti-worldview worldview lol that is post-modernism. I believe there to be some kind of intelligent designer but nothing more. I am still searching for the character of this designer. What do you believe?



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  • 31
    I Find Your Lack of Faith Disturbing says:

    In reply to #10 by QuestioningKat:

    Do you mean that you have not regularly been to church before this time? Ask them why they suddenly feel the need to take you to church.

    They may well have become born again Christians. That’s what happened with my parents. Up to then I went to the local Anglican Sunday School as most kids in the village did, but when they converted, I got whisked off to the local Pentecostal church. Boy that was a culture shock! One minute I was singing hymns on pews and taking part in Nativities and painting eggs at Easter, etc and the next minute I had fundamentalism drummed into me every Sunday, and the services were all happy-clappy, dancing and speaking in tongues.

    My advice to tim2142 is to just grin and bear it for a couple of years – your parents can’t force you to go to church once you turn 18. Use those two years to learn about Christianity and the history of the Bible, which you should also read. You should also familiarise yourself with Christian apologetics and their weaknesses. If you do all that, you’ll be able to counter your parents’ arguments as to why you should believe this stuff – you may even dissuade them from going to church themselves.



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  • 32
    Alan4discussion says:

    In reply to #30 by Unbiased Bias:

    . If you want to disprove the biblical record then use the bible itself.

    Disproving “the Bible” is best done by studying the history before reading it. 15 minutes watching my link @29 is a good start on the Old Testament.

    There are lots of well informed comments and links on biblical history in these discussions:-

    http://www.www.richarddawkins.net/news-articles/2013/1/22/public-school-bible-classes-plagued-with-religious-bias?category=Religion#

    http://www.www.richarddawkins.net/discussions/2013/1/17/non-believer-to-beliver#

    Understanding that The New Testament is an edited collection of myths put together by Roman bishops from a selection of different conflicting gospels at Nicaea, is important background information.
    The teachings of preachers, usually simply omits all the history and accounts of gospels from other Christian sects, which conflict with accepted bible stories.

    I have the unique perspective of being in the world of indifference to theism and then a drastic change to theism ( that is of my parents ). The change to theism has actually made the household I live in more stable with absolute rules not based on a reflection of societies standards that changes but a biblical one.
    Even if the bible is not the inspired word of god it still can be used for a foundation of growth. There needs to be an absolute. Relativism just doesn’t cut it.

    A poor choice of rules can be better than the instability of “shifting sands” and no rules, but thought through and agreed rules and codes of conduct are better than primitive stuff from the bronze-age.

    Another thing to consider is what will you believe?

    On this site simply choosing what you would like to believe is discouraged as unreliable. The use of scientific methodology in investigations followed by logical reasoning is really the only way to get as near as you can to facts.



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  • In reply to #3 by angry_liberal:

    I would keep quiet and do the following:

    1.) Study the bible and take notes of issues you have with it.

    2.) Study the Euthyphro dialogue (http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Trial-Death-Socrates-Dialogues/dp/0486270661/ref=sr11?ie=UTF8&qid=1362471574&sr=8-1) and notice how Socrates unravels a religious argument whilst appearing to agree with it. Be warned that Socrates was still executed for following his conscience in the end.

    The really important thing is to realize that you can be honest with yourself about what you think. Noone can control what happens inside your head. But discussing these things with those around you is about timing and making sure you are intellectually prepared.

    Fair enough, but I wouldn’t be keeping quiet while doing it – I would be asking questions! There’s no point trying to unravel an argument you have misunderstood.



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  • 34
    Roger Guptas says:

    In reply to #32 by Alan4discussion:

    In reply to #30 by Unbiased Bias:

    . If you want to disprove the biblical record then use the bible itself.

    Disproving “the Bible” is best done by studying the history before reading it. 15 minutes watching my link @29 is a good start on the Old Testament.

    There are lots of well informed comments and links on biblical history in these discussions:-

    http://www.www.richarddawkins.net/news-articles/2013/1/22/public-school-bible-classes-plagued-with-religious-bias?category=Religion#

    http://www.www.richarddawkins.net/discussions/2013/1/17/non-believer-to-beliver#

    Understanding that The New Testament is an edited collection of myths put together by Roman bishops from a selection of different conflicting gospels at Nicaea, is important background information.
    The teachings of preachers, usually simply omits all the history and accounts of gospels from other Christian sects, which conflict with accepted bible stories.

    I have the unique perspective of being in the world of indifference to theism and then a drastic change to theism ( that is of my parents ). The change to theism has actually made the household I live in more stable with absolute rules not based on a reflection of societies standards that changes but a biblical one.
    Even if the bible is not the inspired word of god it still can be used for a foundation of growth. There needs to be an absolute. Relativism just doesn’t cut it.

    A poor choice of rules can be better than the instability of “shifting sands” and no rules, but thought through and agreed rules and codes of conduct are better than primitive stuff from the bronze-age.

    Another thing to consider is what will you believe?

    On this site simply choosing what you would like to believe is discouraged as unreliable. The use of scientific methodology in investigations followed by logical reasoning is really the only way to get as near as you can to facts.

    If what you believe is unreliable than believing what you believe to be unreliabale is unreliable.



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  • 35
    Alan4discussion says:

    In reply to #34 by Roger Guptas:

    On this site simply choosing what you would like to believe is discouraged as unreliable. The use of scientific methodology in investigations followed by logical reasoning is really the only way to get as near as you can to facts.

    If what you believe is unreliable than believing what you believe to be unreliabale is unreliable.

    This seem to entirely miss the point that unevidenced “belief” is discouraged, –
    with scientifically investigated and multiple checked information, using expert peer-reviews, being the best method we have for establishing factual knowledge to high levels of probability.

    Simply believing without independent testing IS unreliable.
    Mistaken beliefs can usually be falsified BY testing: – if they are clearly defined, – but understanding the refutation process by falsification, is NOT simply a belief! It is evidence based proof.
    That is what you are confusing.



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  • 36
    Gregory Breytenbach says:

    I am 16 as well and part of that has been deciding what to believe. I had no trouble when I told my parents i was atheist, but I still haven’t told my grandparents. My Grandparents are very christian and I feel they will disassociate themselves with me. It is a tricky situation, but I think you should tell your parents that you would appreciate it if they would let you decide what you want to believe. And once you have decided break it to them gently and over time.



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  • 37
    ChancePike says:

    Hello Tim, in this society of brainwash. You have to fake it. At least that is how i did it. Fake it till people think you are old enough to give out your own views. Faking it is important to fit in and gain acceptance in this “religion” based world. Later they will take you more seriously if you appear to be more literate with religion. Fighting it immediately at young age can be difficult and almost impossible and ‘unacceptable’. Talk to them seriously and do not argue. Keep questioning. That is your way to your true answer.



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