Atheism and Music

Sep 2, 2013


Discussion by: Jogre

Hello all! Ex-fundie preacher here with a very simple discussion: the impact of music. I have been 'illuminated' for about a year, just left the pastorate 6 months ago, and have only started now listening to secular music (just plain 'music' to us atheists). It has taken a while now to become comfortable with the idea of secular music (brainwashing is a difficult struggle) but now my music collection is being flooded by AC/DC, ZZ Top, Elvis, Temptations, etc. I just have to say, secular music is fantastic. 

Anyhow, I was wondering if there a any interesting studies done on music and the interactions/impact it plays in humans. Besides being catchy, sticking in my head, it seems to have the impact to change mood, motivation, and activity levels. A very small but noticeable enjoyment is dancing to Elvis Presley or any Motown music. Dancing was sinful. I love it now. You never could anyway to the abysmal self indulgent tripe called Christian music. It's the little freedoms that make a difference now.

I am now very interested in the role of music in human history and why it looks to have such an impact on us. It seems now that stifling musical talent (for me, AC/DC was seen as a band filled with satanists, therefore to even talk about their music is still an absolute no-no around my siblings and parents) had culled a very integral part of the human psyche. I never liked the boring Christian music I was forced to listen to, and thought I wouldn't like normal music either. I was very wrong. I started with classical, loved it. Then Elvis. Then Motown. Reggae. Rock. Strange how much of the worlds amazing diversity you miss out on when listening to hymns all day. 

Feel free to recommend music that you enjoy. I am looking to replace my entire audio library with decent music. 🙂

– Jon

81 comments on “Atheism and Music

  • 1
    Alexinpessac says:

    Hi, nice to hear that you’re enjoying your music. I admit I’m flabbergasted by this notion of non-religious music being ‘sinful’. I know Catholics and Muslims and they all listen to ordinary music. What sort of bizarre sect did you belong to??!! As for religious music I admit I like Christian hyms, Ave Maria, Christmas carols etc even though I don’t belive a word of the lyrics.



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  • Having just attended the Glastonbury Music Festival this summer, I don’t know where to begin with recommendations. I don’t think there is a genre I can’t listen to under the right circumstances even, gasp, Yoko Ono. Well, maybe she is an exception. :-j

    The point is the circumstances you can now find yourself in. I suspect since you don’t have the social taboos of religion, you can place yourself in all sorts of musical environments from local high-school plays, to live music at bars, to gargantuan festivals, or even to symphonies. Music is fun to experience with others. Have you downloaded a free-radio-streaming app like Pandora or Spotify yet?

    Lastly, I would be shamed if my friends found out that I didn’t urge you to download the entire Beatles’ catalog today. :-j

    Enjoy.

    Mike

    PS: Do you play any instruments?



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  • 3
    Pauly01 says:

    I got to say the obvious ‘The Beatles’. There is so much and contains so many different styles. Of modern bands I’d say ‘The Killers’ even though they are self confessed Mormons (I think) , but man are they good. ‘Cold Play’ are decent (many find them annoying) and also continuing the Beatles vibe check out ‘Oasis’. And if you are looking for something different check out ‘Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds’ , ‘Boatman Call’ being the one I used to listen to. It’s fairly raw stuff though. And man oh man you can’t go wrong with ‘ABBA’.

    Throw in ‘Smashing Pumpkins’, ‘U2’ and ‘Blur’

    P.s I’m from Europe 🙂



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  • 5
    Alan Canon says:

    Don’t neglect jazz, that rich and storied genre, and of course the huge repertory of Western classical music (secular and religious.)



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  • 6
    annette williams says:

    Go to Youtube and key in “Atheists Don’t Have No Songs” – very funny, also true. It’s also on one of the Steep Canyon Rangers’ CDs. I’m a recovering Baptist (“Take my voice and let me sing, Always, only, for my King”), have sung in a big secular choir at top level with famous conductors much of the Western choral repertoire which is largely religious, and so have sung more masses than your average Catholic. Like Dawkins, I am a “cultural Christian”. I don’t believe a word of it either. Like Hitchens, I see the Christian faith as a cult of human sacrifice, but see these great compositions in their historical context. I think that makes them far more meaningful than feeling them as expressions of personal faith.



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  • 7
    Zhap135 says:

    No one’s mentioned Simon & Garfunkel yet – their folk poetry is out of this world. Even the odd religious song isn’t bad when they sing it, but you might want to skip that for the while.

    David Bowie or Queen for glam rock, cannot be missed

    Looking a bit more recent, Cowboy Junkies, The Kills (not to be mistaken for the killers, although these as someone else has said are good to listen to – I can’t detect Mormonism coming out in their music, but I may not be listening hard enough, perhaps if I play the records backwards ill get a message from, well, someone ;p ), Lana del Rey

    Molotov Jukebox, quite folk rocky, who are astounding live. Also Mumford and Sons, Radiohead.

    I know, this is turning into a list of some of my favourite bands.

    You are in a great place that you’ll be discovering bands, that the rest of us have probably taken for granted for too long, like they’re new. The back list of great music is endless from all over the world. Go to gigs, especially small gigs in pubs/bars that have reputation for music, get to festivals, listen with friends, buy an instrument and start picking out tunes that you like, sing.

    One of the many crimes of fundamentalist religions, particularly the big 2, is the stifling of human expression and joy, and music is the most accessible form of art – anyone can listen, anyone can sing, and it doesn’t even matter if you do it badly. You’ve got a long winding journey ahead my friend, but it will be one that you never regret taking the first steps. Listen, love and live!



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  • No one’s mentioned Simon & Garfunkel yet – their folk poetry is out of this world. Even the odd religious song isn’t bad when they sing it, but you might want to skip that for the while.

    David Bowie or Queen for glam rock, cannot be missed

    Looking a bit more recent, Cowboy Junkies, The Kills (not to be mistaken for the killers, although these as someone else has said are good to listen to – I can’t detect Mormonism coming out in their music, but I may not be listening hard enough, perhaps if I play the records backwards ill get a message from, well, someone ;p ), Lana del Rey

    Molotov Jukebox, quite folk rocky, who are astounding live. Also Mumford and Sons, Radiohead.

    I know, this is turning into a list of some of my favourite bands.

    You are in a great place that you’ll be discovering bands, that the rest of us have probably taken for granted for too long, like they’re new. The back list of great music is endless from all over the world. Go to gigs, especially small gigs in pubs/bars that have reputation for music, get to festivals, listen with friends, buy an instrument and start picking out tunes that you like, sing.

    One of the many crimes of fundamentalist religions, particularly the big 2, is the stifling of human expression and joy, and music is the most accessible form of art – anyone can listen, anyone can sing, and it doesn’t even matter if you do it badly. You’ve got a long winding journey ahead my friend, but it will be one that you never regret taking the first steps. Listen, love and live!



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  • 9
    Pabmusic says:

    Oliver Sacks’s Musicophilia is an interesting read and gives a good insight into the brain processes involved in enjoying music.



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  • From personal experience, music seems to me to be a very social expression of emotion, i.e. it’s like proof that others feel the same way I do. Also sometimes I think it’s like an emotion amplifier.

    As for recommendations, if you would like something of a solemn celebration, seriousness in passion, Mogwai are some of my favourites: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1J3-ZOdp3g0



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  • 11
    crookedshoes says:

    Listen to everything. What I like is probably not going to impact what you like. I play guitar, bass, and drums and love bands and players who are over the top on any of these instruments.

    As for the sociology aspect, I always think that music and really any art should be trying to change the world. From Dylan to Guthrie to Pink Floyd to so so many… even something like “I don’t like Mondays” by the boomtown rats…. Live Aid, Farm Aid etc….

    Music has the grand ability to encompass reality and as a form of communication (see Stevie Wonder, Stevie Ray Vaughn, Hendrix, Zeppelin…..) is probably the most important outlet for some people. Clapton, Beck, Dream Theater…

    But, saving the best for last, if you’d like to experience the artist that I admire the most, try some Frank Zappa. Read about him, he was a monster talent and a thorn in the side of preachers and politicians…. An awesome guy!



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  • 13
    ireligious says:

    I remember many years ago the son of a work colleague of my fathers ‘converted’ to christianity, one of those happy clapper churches apparently, and he burnt all his records (I did say many years ago!) as they were deemed satanic (Thin Lizzy etc etc). This guys father wasn’t too happy about the fact he also tithed a percentage of his income to the church. This was in New Zealand which is relatively secular. So the notion of popular music being ‘evil’ or ‘satanic’ doesn’t surprise me at all. Funny thing is this guy became a brother in law of a good friend of mine…..he is still with the happy clappers.

    As for music, a good way of discovering a wider range of what you might like is to seek out a song you know on youtube and look at the other suggestions on the right of the screen, I have found a heap of material that way from forgotten seventies hits (like ‘Every Time I think of you’ by The Babys) to more recent stuff (like Alien Ant Farms cover of Smooth Criminal).



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  • 14
    Ryan1306 says:

    Malmsteen is a mad man. Any time I start thinking I’m getting good at guitar I watch a video of him playing to supremely humble my self.

    In reply to #11 by crookedshoes:

    BTW, want to hear a guitar guy who will knock you out? Try Yngwie Malmsteen.



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  • 15
    Archaic Torso says:

    Glad you’re enjoying a greater diversity of music. It seems to me that ‘Christian Music’ forms a continuum from the pathetically artless to the very beautiful. I once came upon a Christian radio station whilst flicking through stations on the car radio and it baffled me to think that anyone would want to listen to the wretched stuff they were playing (though the discussions in between were quite comedic).

    On the other hand, I certainly don’t dismiss all music which might be termed Christian music; some of it adds beauty to the world and does so irrespective of the dubiousness of the ideas which might have inspired it. In fact a friend took me to a performance of choral works a while ago which I sincerely enjoyed, and the knowledge that it was, essentially, religious music in no way reduced the beauty and feeling of the performance.



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  • hymn organ music says “life is dreary and will get worse”
    gospel says “joy”
    50s rock says “I’m addicted like a stalker to you, but if you dump me, I’ll bounce back”
    2000s pop says “you are brain damaged. I will play the simple-minded intro 4 times for you, identically each time”



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  • 17
    Sedanar says:

    Ah, now that’s my domain !
    I’m a musician myself, have been for all my life since I was a little kid, and have even studied music after the equivalent of high school in France.

    So, first of all, music has a lot of power on the body and mind. Sad songs will tend to make you sad, the same goes for happy, angry, etc etc (at least when it is well done of course.) Sound is vibration, so it is something you will litterally feel with your entire body. I’m not gonna go into the details, but sound (and so, music) is a very physical phenomenon in the scientific way. It’s no wonder it has so much impact on the body when you know that, and it gets you to move around.

    Some parts of music can be considered objective, intervals are either dissonant or consonant. The tritone, for example, which is half way to the octave, also known as “diabolus in musica” (you guessed it, the devil in music) is associated to bad things all over the world, by all cultures. The christian music has a horror of all the non-perfect intervals (perfect fifth, perfect fourth and octave). It excludes pretty much everything. The rest of the music uses the rest along with 5ths and 4ths. Now, I haven’t studied exactly the effect music has on people with scientific methods, but obviously there’s something there.

    As for the role of music in human history, it often goes with political and social movements. For example, blues (blues musicians were already called satanists) is the music black people made in the beginning of the 20th century, singing in cotton fields, being heavily exploited. They sang their misery, their want of freedom. Soul music and then funk follow, and it follows the movement of the black civil rights movement (I highly recommend you check out Strange Fruit as interpreted by Billie Holiday if you haven’t done that yet, it talks of the lynching of black people at the time). The more you progress in time, the more protesting it gets. Reggae is very militant as well, in a time when Jamaica wasn’t doing so well. I know it has this image if being so “cool” and relaxed, even in its sound, but in fact you gotta be “nervous” to play it. You also have hard rock and heavy metal (which happens to be my speciality), and are very atheistic musics.

    Heavy metal is quite an “angry” music, but also full of beautiful melodies and moving themes. Metalheads have always been considered, even by a wide public, as satanists, even though of course it’s not true at all. There’s no more satanists among metalheads than anywhere else. Heavy metal, and especially thrash metal in the usa, often have political themes. A few examples : Accept wrote songs about how minorities were oppressed, including gay people (the song Love Child.) Thrash metal bands tend to be very political, and that includes religion. Bands such as Exodus or Slayer are against religion and war-mongering politicians. The band Arch Enemy has associated with Amnesty International several times now.

    All that to say that music is rife with socio-political themes. It simply goes hand in hand : it’s what musicians live in their lives, and that’s part of what they want to talk about. There’s not only those themes however ; there’s also a lot of little stories, or songs about books, works of fiction, or historical events.

    A few recommandations I can make :

    Classical : There are several styles that go into that one in fact, but let’s keep it simple.

    Baroque : Bach (I assume you already know this one since he was very religious), Vivaldi, Haendel.

    Classical : Haydn, Mozart (of course !) Beethoven.

    Romantic : Beethoven too, he’s in between classical and romantic movements. Schumann, Schubert, Rachmaninov, Chopin.

    Impressionnism : Debussy, Ravel.

    Blues : B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Muddy Waters, Elmore James, John Lee Hooker

    Jazz : Miles Davis, Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, Wes Montgomery, Thelonious Monk

    Soul : Marvin Gaye, The Meters, Booker T and the M.G’s (Green onions is very famous), Otis Redding.

    Blues/rock : Gary Moore (you’ll find a concert on youtube where he plays with BBKing, it’s simply AMAZING !), Rory Gallagher (Incredibly talented as well.) Jimi Hendrix, I suppose you’ve heard of this one. Unfortunately, all three are dead.

    Funk : James Brown, Sly and the family Stone, George Clinton, Bootsy Collins, Maceo Parker.

    Psychedelic rock : Pink Floyd, Grateful Dead, Soft Machine

    Hard rock : Deep Purple, Led Zeppelin, AC/DC, Scorpions (those are very famous, I suppose you know them.)

    Heavy metal : Accept, Running wild, Saxon, Judas Priest, Pretty Maids, Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath

    Thrash metal : Exodus, Overkill, Annihilator, Slayer (don’t like this one but they’re one of the biggest), Megadeth, Destruction, Sodom, Metal Church.

    Death metal : Arch Enemy, Amon Amarth, Death.

    Power metal (those guys like to talk of heroic fantasy, dragons, fiction books in general) : Blind Guardian, Hammerfall.

    I think that’s already a lot. Feel free to ask for more. Edit : I made the list more clear, sorry if it takes a lot of space but it just wasn’t clear enough for my liking.



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  • 18
    Sedanar says:

    Replying to a few of the comments before, Malmsteen plays fast, but musically speaking it’s of no interest. Most of experimented guitar players (including myself) can do that. Maybe not THAT well, but close enough (he’s spent his whole life going as fast as possible after all), and hearing arpeggios and scales over and over again get boring very fast, even more when you can do that yourself.
    Though when he stops playing fast he can play very well. His cover of Mistreated by Deep Purple is surprising and very good.



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  • I’d wither up and die without music!

    I have very eclectic tastes – and there is just so much to listen to, whether from different styles, different cultures or different periods of history. I suggest you listen to everything and then concentrate on whatever takes your fancy.

    Welcome to LIFE!



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  • 22
    QuestioningKat says:

    Wow ex-Fundie preacher…let’s talk about that!!!

    I find it interesting when some churches shun music when my former liberal church chose secular songs with a good message. I cannot imagine why “All you need is love” would be taboo. I would recommend getting onto Pandora.com. I am not one for liking mainstream music and prefer what is novel and new. If you start a station with one artist and then add a few for variety, they will play music that is similar. You can also do a google search to find names of artists in certain genres.

    Music makes people happy. Rather than ruminating in my head, sometimes its best to have a joyful tune in my thoughts instead.



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  • 23
    Ryan1306 says:

    I agree. Musically he’s not my favorite guitar player, but I do admire his skill. Even though like you said, he’s just doing a bunch of arpeggios, I still find it pretty impressive. I’d say musically even guys like Keith Richards or The Edge from U2 are more talented because even though their not ripping up the guitar they come up with awesome, memorable riffs and that’s where real musical talent lies.

    In reply to #17 by Sedanar:

    Replying to a few of the comments before, Malmsteen plays fast, but musically speaking it’s of no interest. Most of experimented guitar players (including myself) can do that. Maybe not THAT well, but close enough (he’s spent his whole life going as fast as possible after all), and hearing arpeggios…



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  • 24
    shortpolock says:

    Go on iTunes and preview the more popular songs of these groups and artists, off the top:
    Agalloch (Black Metal but totally worth it, in my opinion)

    Alice In Chains

    BB King

    Beatles (of course)

    Bruce Springsteen (Newer Stuff)

    Billie Holiday

    Birthday Massacre

    The Cure

    The Cult (a Must)

    Cindi Lauper pre 1988

    Charlie Parker

    The Clash (A MUST)

    Dire Straits (Brothers In Arms)

    Dave Matthews Band (Under the Table and Dreaming)

    Depeche Mode

    Eurythmics

    Etta James

    Ella Fitzgerald (A must)

    Foo Fighters

    Guns ‘N Roses (Pre Terminator 2 Soundtrack)

    Stone Temple Pilots

    Goo Goo Dolls

    Interpol

    Jeff Beck

    John Mayer

    John Coltrane

    Killing Joke

    LeadBelly

    Louis Armstrong

    Muddy Waters

    Madonna (The Immaculate Collection)

    Mark Knopfler (Sailing to Philadelphia)

    Motorhead

    Motley Crue

    Van Halen (self titled album and 0U812)

    Men At Work

    Miles Davis

    Norah Jones (Come Away With Me)

    Ramones

    Rush (Any album with Neil Peart)

    Rolling Stones

    The Police

    The Pretenders

    The Soggy Bottom Boys

    The Smoking Popes

    Sting

    Thelonius Monk

    U2 (Rattle and Hum)

    Wynton Marsalis



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  • 25
    Katy Cordeth says:

    I remember many years ago the son of a work colleague of my fathers ‘converted’ to christianity, one of those happy clapper churches apparently, and he burnt all his records (I did say many years ago!) as they were deemed satanic (Thin Lizzy etc etc). This guys father wasn’t too happy about the fact he also tithed a percentage of his income to the church. This was in New Zealand which is relatively secular. So the notion of popular music being ‘evil’ or ‘satanic’ doesn’t surprise me at all.

    Funny thing is that if you play Cliff Richard records backwards, and I promise you this is true…

    …they sound a lot better.

    Apparently no one ever told Sir Cliff that the copyright to all the best tunes is held by the dude with the pitchfork and the horns. Or that setting the words of the Lord’s Prayer to the tune of Auld Lang Syne as he did with his Millennium Prayer (don’t click on this link unless you have a strong stomach) does not constitute music. I’m still surprised that there wasn’t more of an outcry from the Scots about this abomination given Robert Burns’ status as demigod up there. I know Burns wasn’t responsible for the music, but still.


    I’m not sure what his religious beliefs if any are, but Tom Waits is a particular favorite of mine. His songs Chocolate Jesus and Dirt in the Ground suggest a less than reverential attitude toward religion.

    Leonard Cohen is awesome as well. I’ve been listening to the hypnotic and deeply spooky Who by Fire over and over while composing this comment. It finally managed to kill the Vincent earworm I’ve had burrowing around my cerebral cortex for the past week. Cohen’s song Hallelujah, despite being rather overused in film and television and being murdered a few years ago when it was released by some X-Factor nonentity who won that talent vacuum contest, is another classic, from a career full of them. Here is the late Jeff Buckley’s lovely version of that song.

    Johnny Cash was very religious, but still trumps all others as far as I’m concerned. Even his gospel stuff is fantastic, because it’s performed with passion (take note, auditionees for X-Factor, The Voice and Britain’s Got Simpletons or whatever it’s called, passion means believing what you’re singing; it doesn’t mean balling your hands into fists and holding them up in front of you whilst simultaneously making the face of a constipated bull moose straining at stool. Don’t stretch every single note out as far as you can, neither. Whitney could get away with that, but you ain’t Whitney).

    If anyone here can listen to this version of I Saw the Light, sung by Johnny with accompaniment from Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis, without tapping their feet, I’ll buy them a Mercedes.

    These are terrific too:

    Will the Circle be Unbroken

    When the Man Comes Around

    Hurt

    Avoid this one at all costs. Still better than the turkey-necked closet case’s efforts though.

    Billie Holiday. Strange Fruit, as Sedanar says in comment 16, is amazing. You might wish to avoid Gloomy Sunday if you don’t seek to join the ranks of those who may or may not have committed suicide after listening to it. Snopes.com

    I know I link to this guy a lot, but for anyone interested in the Life of Lady Day, there’s a half-hour radio program you can listen to or download free here about her life.

    Who else.

    Elvis Costello. The Police, but not Sting. The Clash. The Dubliners. Annie Lennox, and the Eurythmics. The Pretenders. The Pogues. Elton John. Amy Winehouse definitely; Back to Black should be on anyone’s top-ten album list. Pulp. Blondie. Kate Bush. The Proclaimers. Aretha. Queen, of course. The Specials. David Bowie’s pre-nineties catalog. R.E.M. Dolly Parton. Prince. Hank Williams (Sr., not his dumbass son). Tom Petty.

    Those are a few of my own recommendations anyway. I’m starting to become a little envious of you, Jon.



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  • 26
    shortpolock says:

    In reply to #23 by shortpolock:

    Go on iTunes and preview the more popular songs of these groups and artists, off the top:
    Agalloch (Black Metal but totally worth it, in my opinion)

    Alice In Chains

    BB King

    Beatles (of course)

    Bruce Springsteen (Newer Stuff)

    Billie Holiday

    Birthday Massacre

    The Cure

    The Cult (a Must)

    Cindi…

    and the Smiths, Morrissey, too



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  • 29
    bob_e_s says:

    Two points:-

    1. Imagine being given the freedom to discover the world of music as an adult. I wouldn’t do anything else. I’d love the chance to re-discover Led Zeppelin again from scratch.

    2. I’ve often thought of music as an argument that the emotions provoked in religious people by their faith can be stimulated by completely secular experiences. I’ve had, for want of a better word, ‘religious’ experiences while playing and listening to music.

    I also consider Satan to be a bit of a comedy character (probably watched too much South Park), so for rock to be the devil’s music is fine by me.



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  • 30
    Stevehill says:

    It’s all good! I even like some religious music – proper stuff like classical requiems, or Handel’s Messiah, or Bach’s St Matthew Passion.

    What I have no time for at all is the uniquely American genre of so-called “Christian” popular music. It is unadulterated drivel. Pop and rock music is supposed to be a bit edgy, and deal with subjects like love and sex and infidelity and rebellion and social protest. Take all that out and you’re left with hymns. Fucking badly arranged hymns at that.

    Thank god nobody but Americans has any time for this shit.



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  • 31
    bluebird says:

    In reply to #24 by Katy Cordeth:

    ‘Back in Black’

    Has withstood the test of time – an awesome album to cut one’s teeth on.

    Hank I

    Hank III is popular on country music’s periphery; he is unique.

    Nine Inch Nails, Metallica, Alice in Chains…to name just a few.



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  • 33
    SaganTheCat says:

    welcome to the dark side!

    as a studio cat i understand the importance of music among apes. this video has been doing the rounds as some anecdotal evidence of the power of music (yes he thanks god but he’s old, leave him be!)

    even those who have lost their hearing have learned to appreciate and continue to create music (composer Beethoven and DJ/producer Frankie Wilde). it’s more than just sounds, it’s a form of communication that goes beyond verbal. As an art form it is extremely emotive, my favorite trick is to match major key happy tunes to depressing lyrics or melancholic minor keys to happy words. somehow the emotion it conveys is more “real”.

    It must be awesome listening to AC/DC after nothing but christian music, it’s a bit of a cliche that if you want to scare people off any type of music, put the word “christian” in front of it (e.g. Christian rock, Christian Metal and the dreaded Christian Rap). If you havent already listened I’d recomend the grandfathers of humanist prog-rock; Rush. a huge back catalogue to keep you amused.

    My own work is mostly hip-hop, electronica or dance music. can’t advise where to start, go to youtube and search! and get out as much as you can, raves, gigs, club nights, etc. it’s like church but the smiles are genuine.

    I have to say, I’m more happy fpor you to have discoverred music than to have discovered atheism. it may have been part of my conversion too though. I knew not to listen to Black Sabbath or Black Widow or Venom but I did anyway. and I never managed to raise the devil. wasn’t long before I applied my findings to religion.



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  • 35
    Katy Cordeth says:

    In reply to #31 by bluebird:

    In reply to #24 by Katy Cordeth:

    ‘Back in Black’

    Has withstood the test of time – an awesome album to cut one’s teeth on.

    I’m sure it has, and is. I was talking about Back to Black, though, Amy Winehouse’s seminal album.

    Hank I

    Hank III is popular on country music’s periphery; he is unique.

    Shows how out of touch I am. I didn’t even know there was a Hank Williams III. Number two is the one who said Obama is Hitler though, isn’t he?

    Talent, and perhaps sanity, must in this case have skipped a generation.

    Nine Inch Nails, Metallica, Alice in Chains…to name just a few.

    I haven’t heard of these bands, but I’m sure they’re wonderful.



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  • 36
    bob_e_s says:

    In reply to #35 by Katy Cordeth:

    Nine Inch Nails, Metallica, Alice in Chains…to name just a few.

    I haven’t heard of these bands, but I’m sure they’re wonderful.

    You haven’t heard of Metallica?



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  • 37
    Katy Cordeth says:

    In reply to #3 by Pauly01:

    And man oh man you can’t go wrong with ‘ABBA’.

    Darn skippy. I’m a little ashamed to have forgotten the Swedish songmeisters when I made my own list.



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  • 38
    Katy Cordeth says:

    In reply to #36 by bob_e_s:

    In reply to #35 by Katy Cordeth:

    Nine Inch Nails, Metallica, Alice in Chains…to name just a few.

    I haven’t heard of these bands, but I’m sure they’re wonderful.

    You haven’t heard of Metallica?

    Yeah, bad phrasing on my part. I’ve heard the name, certainly. I’ve heard of Nine Inch Nails too. I’m just not familiar with their music.

    Alice in Chains though is from the frickin’ moon.



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  • 40
    inquisador says:

    Some great suggestions here. I must throw in a few more

    Feel free to throw ’em out again:

    Warren Zevon Any of the albums. Start with Excitable Boy and on from there.

    Little Feat. I love the Dixie Chicken album.

    Then there’s Lovin’ Spoonful, Jackson Browne, Fairport Convention, Neil Young, The Handsome Family.

    The great Beethoven piano concertos, Mahler Symphonies, anything by Elgar or Bach at least.

    And never under-estimate the great Fats Waller.



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  • 41
    crookedshoes says:

    To infuse a bit of “video” coolness…
    I was searching TED for some clips to show my students and I ran across a couple absolute gems:

    Sleepy Man Banjo Boys… Bluegrass virtuosos at 13!!!!!

    Mark Applebaum ….. the mad scientist of music.

    Naturally 7 ….. 7 beatboxers who manage to emulate an entire band and harmonize in 7 part harmony!!!

    Derek Paravinci and Adam Ockelford…. in the key of genius.

    Please discover these monster performers.
    One highlight, I will aim you towards. Mark Applebaum has fused musical notation and graphic art. He designs sheet music that is so non traditional and so damn cool. He posted it in a museum and musicians show up for an hour or so on a certain preordained day and interpret his manuscripts. You gotta see it! Zappa would have smiled (and smoked and drank coffee)…



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  • I started listening music at the age of 19 – as before that I truly believed that classical music was too complicated and people playing rock stank (as if I had sniffed anybody). Opinion of a decent Soviet girl.
    But then Soviet Union started falling into pieces and I went to prep courses of the university. And one day our teacher started her lecture with words: “Girls, Freddie Mecury is dead!” I almost asked aloud: “Who is that?” But then I started looking for information and gradually got fond of listening to guitar music …. It was a liberating experience. Though not immediate. Because, for example, it took me quite a time to listen to some heavy metal. Again because I got curious about our group Skyforger. The boys have mastered both folk music and rock, so the result is really interesting.



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  • 43
    SaganTheCat says:

    I’m sure it’s against forum rules but here goes….

    Death of Hi Fi: “Anthropocene” (available on iTunes, second album “Follow” to be released soon)



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  • 45
    Damien Karras says:

    Excellent!
    If you like AC/DC (and who in their right mind doesn’t) try these albums:

    “Paranoid” by Black Sabbath;

    “Ace Of Spades” by Motörhead;

    “Permanent Waves” by Rush.



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  • 46
    DocWebster says:

    BTW, want to hear a guitar guy who will knock you out? Try Yngwie Malmsteen.

    I was thinking the same thing but I would add Jerry Reed, Chet Atkins, and Ricky Skaggs. I’ve been a metal head since the first time I heard IronMan but I could watch all three of those guys play for hours in rapt fascination and Jerry Reed is as infectious as a box of wiener puppies.



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  • 47
    bluebird says:

    In reply to #35 by Katy Cordeth:

    … Amy Winehouse

    I’ve only heard her sing on a duet she performed with Tony Bennett. Very lovely ~ so sad that a great talent was lost too soon. Loved her look, too.

    Johnny Cash

    …and I’ll be dancing on a pony keg 😉



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  • 48
    The Jersey Devil says:

    I’ve heard it before, heavy metal music like leads kids astray. People point to serial killer Richard Ramirez or the suicides of James Vance and Raymond Belknap like it’s some kind of proof. Meh. What about the millions of people who listen to this music without an issue? To my knowledge, it has never been shown that music has this much of an effect on people.

    I suppose the latest bit of moral panic has been Miley Cyrus and her little dance routine on the MTV. Please, like kids will run out and have sex simply because of being exposed to this tacky display.

    As far as musical suggestions, much of this thread read like a dating website profile. However, I’ll throw in my two cents and suggest the album “Criminal Minded” by Boogie Down Productions.



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  • 49
    Alexinpessac says:

    Tears for Fears. Plus early Bryan Adams, Madness and early 80s British pop in general, U2, Alanis Morrissette… Plus something little-known – Variations by Andrew Lloyd Webber.

    It’s amazing how we all jump at the chance to express our musical tastes !!



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  • First off, I can’t thank everyone enough! I have a ton of music to listen to, with very interesting tidbits thrown in between.

    I would like to say, the ‘dark side’ is very fun. In fact, despite occasional difficulty in my brains patterning, I have come to see the devil as such a caricature as to be hilarious. ‘Devils’ music is quite entertaining to me now. When I see Angus Young wearing horns I can even bring myself to say: ‘Grab me a pair.’ Very liberating indeed. Nothing is holy, and boy can I actually breath for the first time!

    In reply to #33 by SaganTheCat:

    It must be awesome listening to AC/DC after nothing but christian music, it’s a bit of a cliche that if you want to scare people off any type of music, put the word “christian” in front of it (e.g. Christian rock, Christian Metal and the dreaded Christian Rap).

    I can’t tell you how amazing it is. I bought their entire discography… I have all their vinyl from 1975-85 as well. Even when a sincerely devout Christian, I can say the only music that ever I enjoyed was contained in hymnals. There are some wonderful hymns – their history, their composition, writers, etc. make them very appealing to me. At this point however, it does more damage to my peace of mind, and conjures up some rather unpleasant memories – despite the beauty.

    If you havent already listened I’d recomend the grandfathers of humanist prog-rock; Rush. a huge back catalogue to keep you amused.

    As a Canadian patriot I would be remiss to say I haven’t dabbled in the Rush phenomena. I was introduced to them during my brother’s rebellious phase a number years ago. I even remember my visceral reaction to the 5 pointed star on the cover of 2112… I nearly had a panic attack and told my pastor father that the devil’s Pentacle was upstairs on a CD. My brother and I were sat down for 3 hours of religious instruction about demonic music, such as ‘Stairway to Heaven’, ‘Hotel California’ and other Satanic things. We threw all the CD’s out, and then had to pray over the house ‘to cleanse the unclean spirits’ from the home. I had nightmares for a while, believing that the Devil now had a doorway into our home. Thanks religion.

    get out as much as you can, raves, gigs, club nights, etc. it’s like church but the smiles are genuine.

    I can’t say how histerically I laughed at this.

    I have to say, I’m more happy for you to have discovered music than to have discovered atheism. it may have been part of my conversion too though.

    It has played one role for me – desensitization and contextualization. Music, particularly the devilish kind, constantly reinforces that there is nothing to fear, and you can even revel in the fact that you used to be frightened by words, objects, and magical incantations.



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  • 52
    CdnMacAtheist says:

    For more insight into how music affects humans, read Daniel J Levitin’s books: This Is Your Brain On Music and The World In Six Songs.

    I’m unable to play any musical instrument or sing, but I love to listen to high quality music. Being an ex-Brit I tend towards classic rock, but I’m into a wide range of artists.

    I’ve seen concerts by Pink Floyd, Genesis, Moody Blues, 10cc’s, ELO, ELP, Supertramp, Jethro Tull, CSNY, Clapton, Zappa, KD Lang, etc. Annie Lennox, Bonnie Raitt, Sarah McLachlin, Joni Mitchell, Kate Bush and KT Tunstall always get my attention…. 😎

    Oddly, as a non-religious anti-theist, KD Lang singing Leonard Cohen’s Hallelujah has a deep effect on me…. Mac.



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  • In reply to #21 by QuestioningKat:

    Wow ex-Fundie preacher…let’s talk about that!!!

    Here’s a little bit of information to assuage your enthusiam 🙂 I hope you don’t mind a little topic derailing

    My father was a pastor. His mother, the female equivalent (which entailed her gathering the whole of their neighbourhoods youth, and having bible studies every day after school – 30 children in all) was extremely religious. We evangelised as a family. My father ALWAYS witnessed to the waiters at restaurants. He carried Gideon bibles everywhere. This always forced out of my comfort zone. Books were my world. I had trepidations about evangelism even then. My eidetic memory helped me learn Hebrew by the time I was 15 – I wanted to be Middle-eastern Archaeologist originally. I read the bible in almost every English translation, and became radicalised by literalism. My father was a very influential preacher on the Revival circle in Canada. They are a ‘women in long skirts, hair covered, never allowed to speak in church,’ type. I sometimes have bouts of depression on how I treated women… and it still often haunts me.

    I started preaching at a radical Anglican church. This was anathema to the family, until they found out this sect left the ‘Official Church’ because of the decision to have gay priests admitted into fellowship. They were evangelical to the core. Should anyone like to read or listen to my sermons as a lark, I can send you links. I preached on faith, not evidence, that literal interpretation was the only way, and Jesus was the true path alone. I was a fundie, to my everlasting shame.

    [Link to personal blog removed by moderator – feel free to share the story here instead.]

    Now I simply enjoy life out of the magnifying glass that congregations hold to their clergy. I went back to high school online, got accepted for an Astrophysics program at the University of Toronto, but my family removed my funding when they found out about my love of science. I am now in the process of joining the Canadian Armed Forces, as a Telecom operator, in order to put myself through University on my own.



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  • 54
    Stevehill says:

    In reply to #53 by Jogre:

    In reply to #21 by QuestioningKat:

    Wow ex-Fundie preacher…let’s talk about that!!!

    Here’s a little bit of information to assuage your enthusiam 🙂

    May I say for the record that your family suck bigtime? It takes a special kind of stupidity to remove educational funding from your own child because of a difference of opinion about faith.

    Best of luck funding your own way through university. We need astrophysicists more than we need preachers.



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  • 55
    jimbobjim says:

    I am a Christian (nearly 50 year old) but when I was young (teens) there was a big thing in my church about Secular Music (non Christian) being evil and I bought into that and destroyed my records (which was a good collection)…a few years later I started looking into this a bit and realised that this was non sense but have made it a bit of an interest, so here are a few thoughts/insights.conclusions:
    1. The whole “secular (mainly rock and roll) is evil” idea started with a conversation with Evangelist Jimmy Swaggart (the TV evangelist) and Jerry Lee Lewis (they are cousins). In the conversation (they were both very young at the time and Lewis was just getting into R&R and Swaggart into preaching), Lewis played some of his music to Swaggart, who didn’t like and said that it was evil. They had a bit of a fight over this and Swaggart decided that Rock and Roll was evil and Lewis decided that Swaggart might be right and if he was was, then Lewis would happily give his life over to this evil and rebellion. I’m sure this is not the only reason for the divide but seems to be the earliest story of the separation.
    2. Music is neither evil or good as a force (it might be “evil/good” in judgement of the quality) but lyrics can be sued for a whole number of reasons, good and bad. There are some artist who are openly religious and sing about God (Elvis), some who are religious but don’t sing about God but are open about their religion (Bono, Alice Cooper, Brian Head, etc) and some who are religious but it doesn’t affect their music and they keep their religion to themselves. You apply that to many other walks of life (politics/sexual orientation etc.)
    3. I found this video (or a preacher) and like what he had to say. http://youtu.be/yA8vbfkV22c



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  • 56
    OHooligan says:

    This page has a great list of music to explore. The Devil does indeed have the best tunes. I’m surprised nobody mentioned these ones (so I’m going to):

    • John Lennon’s “Imagine”
    • The Rolling Stones’ “Sympathy for the Devil”



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  • Jon

    I hope you enjoy more music now, I’ll suggest:
    TriPod – Anything by these guys, a comedy band from Aus
    & The Streets – albums: Everything is borrowed, Original pirate material & A grand don’t come for free

    God



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  • 59
    john.wb says:

    Take the opportunity to listen to music in a different language. For most of my life I merely “liked” music; rock, jazz etc. One day I heard Silvio Rodriguez singing and I was blown away – I was learning Spanish at the time and the music and learning just connected in such a seamless way. It opened my eyes to a whole world of amazing songs I never knew existed. And it made learning fun. Enjoy!



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  • 60
    SaganTheCat says:

    In reply to #51 by Jogre:

    I even remember my visceral reaction to the 5 pointed star on the cover of 2112

    scary! I have to say that reminds me of my old music teacher, lovely welshman who made up funny songs about the students during classes instead of telling them off but a serious christian and often had rants about “satanic” music. Rush always mentioned (maybe because of the pentagram) along with Kiss and a few other big bands we were into but as kids we were all insulted that he called this music satanic, when it simply wasn’t and any one of us could easily show him our record collections of real satanic music!

    I guess I had it a little easier, my poor mum did complain about having to iron my Venom T shirt (pentagram with satanic goat-head and the words “look at me Satan’s child born of evil thus defiled” printed on it) but no one ever thought I took it seriously. which I didn’t, it was all a bit of a joke but then I also have a collection of christian metal band Stryper for pretty much the same reason

    AC/DC were the first heavy rock band I got into quickly followed by Iron Maiden the year they released Number of the Beast. that along with playing Dungeons and Dragons in my spare time with the other geeks probably ment my church were praying for me behind my back all the time. I was learning guitar so my church wanted me to play but I had to confess the only thing I knew all the way through was Whole Lotta Rosie



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  • 61
    ZedBee says:

    Oh dear, I am asking to be lynched here. Nevertheless, I will still say that as far as I am concerned the only music worth listening to is that of Mozart first, then that of Haydn, and little bits of Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and very few others.

    When I listen to the “religious music” composed before Mozart, I wonder how any Christian managed to hang on to his or her faith after suffering it, but when I listen to Mozart’s Laudate Dominum and Agnus Dei, I wonder why all those who ever heard the divine tunes didn’t rush immediately to the nearest church to be baptised.

    Dvorak? Britten? Sex Pistols? Elvis? Girls Aloud? Do me a favour. I am now ready – like Giordano Bruno – to be roasted on the stake for blasphemy, with my tongue in a clamp



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  • 62
    quarecuss says:

    The Essential Leonard Cohen will provide musical spirituality with a healthy dose of irony to offset any cloying religiosity.



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  • 63
    crookedshoes says:

    The music you listen to is beautiful and you have a right to enjoy it and express your (valid) opinion regarding it. No lynching. You can always expand your palate, but, if not, it’s still ok with me.

    In reply to #61 by ZedBee:

    Oh dear, I am asking to be lynched here. Nevertheless, I will still say that as far as I am concerned the only music worth listening to is that of Mozart first, then that of Haydn, and little bits of Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and very few others.

    When I listen to the “religious music” composed before…



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  • 64
    bluebird says:

    In reply to #61 by ZedBee:

    Mozart first, then that of Haydn

    Tough call – a professor/composer friend of mine wrote “Mozart is my favorite composer, there is nothing to be improved upon”.

    Yet, Mozart was directly influenced by “papa” Hayden, whose music I find most pleasing!



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  • 65
    ZedBee says:

    In response to bluebird (#64) and thank you crookedshoes (#63)

    May Wolfgang and papa Franz Joseph bless you, bluebird.

    I agree with your composer friend, and would also agree with you that certain passages in the music of both Mozart and Haydn seem to echo each other, but that surely is not so much influence or imitation but rather the love and great respect they had for each other.

    Suffice it to quote Haydn’s words to Leopold, “I swear to you before God and in all honesty, that your son is the greatest composer I know, whether by name or reputation. He has taste, and moreover, and most profound understanding of composition”.

    Amen.



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  • In reply to #55 by jimbobjim:

    I am a Christian (nearly 50 year old) but when I was young (teens) there was a big thing in my church about Secular Music (non Christian) being evil and I bought into that and destroyed my records (which was a good collection)

    Thanks a lot for the comment 🙂 In my home, the devil ‘entered’ rock and roll with Robert Johnson, the inventor of the blues. He was an African American in the 40’s, and his critics often said that he sold his soul to play the guitar. Whether this was racially prompted or not, I remember hearing of this as a kid. The railings of Swaggart and co. were always being repeated en masse. My father used to burn records, were he claimed he heard ‘the screams of demons’ coming out as they melted in a barrel. This story is often told by other like minded Christians who burn vinyl.

    We burned music, pictures, movies, items. There was evil attached to many things, and I estimate that I lost probably over $1000 from my childhood. The amount of saving and scrimping this took was incomparable as a child without a source of income. At the time I didn’t mind, I was happy to please god, but I figured god would repay me in a different way. Never happened, but what can you do.

    In reply to #61 by ZedBee:

    Mozart first, then that of Haydn, and little bits of Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, and very few others

    Fantastic recommendations, insofar as I already listen to them 😉

    In reply to #2 by Sample:

    Do you play any instruments?

    Yes – sort of. As a pastors son, I learned to play the piano from the hymnal. I loathe playing instruments however. I can get through any blues rock stuff on a guitar, courtesy of my brother. Again, musical prowess is not my gift. I like listening to music, though I am hopelessly arrhythmic… I’m a tech-guy, so I have fancy electronics to have others play their instruments TO me 😉

    Jon



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  • ***An update *** to all you wonderful people and your recommendations.

    Here is what I have purchased for my library so far:

    AC/DC – entire discography

    Elvis Presley – Best Hits

    Chuck Berry – Top 50

    Temptations – Best Hits

    The Strawbs – Best Hits

    The Beatles – Abbey Road

    The Wings – Best Hits

    Chicago – Best Hits

    Bob Marley – B is for Bob

    Bob Seger and the Silver Bullets- Hits

    Genesis – Genesis

    UB40 – Top Hits

    Once again, thanks to everyone so far!

    Jon



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  • 68
    Skeptic says:

    In reply to #67 by Jogre:

    An update to all you wonderful people and your recommendations.

    Here is what I have purchased for my library so far:

    I don’t know if anyone else mentioned it but, Pink Floyd. Put on ‘Dark Side of the Moon’ with headphones and the lights out and your life will be transformed.



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  • 70
    jimbobjim says:

    In reply to #69 by shortpolock:

    And Eric Clapton, if no one mentioned him. Can’t believe I missed that…

    You should be ashamed of yourself for missing Clapton. Funny enough in the 70s a lot of Christian Rock Bands added Clapton’s “In The Presence Of The Lord” until people started working out the true story behind the song.



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  • 71
    Katy Cordeth says:

    In reply to #70 by jimbobjim:

    In reply to #69 by shortpolock:

    And Eric Clapton, if no one mentioned him. Can’t believe I missed that…

    You should be ashamed of yourself for missing Clapton. Funny enough in the 70s a lot of Christian Rock Bands added Clapton’s “In The Presence Of The Lord” until people started working out the true story behind the song.

    Eric Clapton. Talentless rip-off merchant and supporter of extreme-right British nationalist politics.

    Wikipedia:

    I used to be into dope, now I’m into racism. It’s much heavier, man. Fucking wogs, man. Fucking Saudis taking over London. Bastard wogs. Britain is becoming overcrowded and Enoch will stop it and send them all back. The black wogs and coons and Arabs and fucking Jamaicans and fucking [indecipherable] don’t belong here, we don’t want them here. This is England, this is a white country, we don’t want any black wogs and coons living here. We need to make clear to them they are not welcome. England is for white people, man. We are a white country. I don’t want fucking wogs living next to me with their standards. This is Great Britain, a white country, what is happening to us, for fuck’s sake? We need to vote for Enoch Powell, he’s a great man, speaking truth. Vote for Enoch, he’s our man, he’s on our side, he’ll look after us. I want all of you here to vote for Enoch, support him, he’s on our side. Enoch for Prime Minister! Throw the wogs out! Keep Britain white!”

    Of course this way way back in 1976, and he was drunk when he delivered this onstage rant, so he probably regrets it. Except, in 2007, in an interview with Melvyn Bragg, he reiterated his support for Enoch Powell.

    I see he’s now a supporter of UKIP.

    I know someone’s personal views don’t necessarily reflect in their body of work – I adore the music of Wagner; Queen played apartheid-era South Africa; Bowie said some pretty asinine things about race at around the same time as Clapton.

    But as least these three were supremely talented and original. Clapton bemoaned the presence of ‘wogs’ and ‘coons’ in his country while making a career plagiarising black music.

    I wouldn’t sully my iPod with his albums.



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  • 72
    Luke Weel says:

    You should try Ayreon! It’s a music project by a man named Arjen Anthony Lucassen.
    It’s Science fiction themed progressive rock with a story spanning all albums.
    I personally think listening to these stories about human emotions en our future are what got my love for science started.
    And in turn a more evolved form of rational thinking and skepticism.
    Other works of his are ”Lost in the New Real” ”Guilt Machine” and ”Star One”



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  • 73
    Alan4discussion says:

    In reply to #69 by shortpolock:

    And Eric Clapton, if no one mentioned him. Can’t believe I missed that…

    .. and no Henrixists either ?!!!!



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  • 74
    Sedanar says:

    In reply to #73 by Alan4discussion:

    In reply to #69 by shortpolock:

    And Eric Clapton, if no one mentioned him. Can’t believe I missed that…

    .. and no Henrixists either ?!!!!

    I did mention Henrix. I didn’t mention Clapton though.

    If I may add a suggestion to the original post : listen to early albums by Ozzy Osbourne when he had Randy Rhoads on the guitar.



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  • 76
    Hugh Jampton says:

    I can’t begin to tell you how jealous I am that you’re going to discover a whole world of music from scratch. Music is such a deeply engrained part of our humanity that I don’t think I’d want to live without it.

    A few suggestions:
    I assume you’ve already ‘found’ the Rolling Stones (early stuff particularly), Led Zeppelin, and Pink Floyd, but some of Roger Waters’ solo stuff is really very good. Have a listen to some of Robert Plant’s solo work, it’s very eclectic.
    Genesis (‘Jesus He Knows Me’ should produce a wry smile) is great, but check out their former front-man Peter Gabriel’s 1986 masterpiece ‘So’. He’s currently playing this album as a live tour.
    The Who are superb, and one of the very best live bands I’ve ever seen, along with The Stranglers and Pet Shop Boys, in very different ways!
    Kirsty MacColl is under-rated as a witty and funny songwriter in her own right, but also made a couple of gorgeous cover versions. Try her ‘Tropical Brainstorm’ album for a latin-themed meditation on life and relationships. Bebel Gilberto, and Astrud and João Gilberto are good for introducing you to the sensual Bossa Nova and other Brazilian sounds, and could lead you on to Stan Getz’s jazz.
    If you fancy a bit of the lounge sound, try listening to the internet radio station Martini In The Morning, which plays a wide range of jazz and ‘rat pack’ style music. Diana Krall is very good too.
    2-Tone and Ska is an interesting genre, you could do worse than look into The Specials, Madness, and The Selecter.
    I could go on and on!

    Music is such a subjective, personal thing that I feel it’s a bit of a waste of time continuing to just list my favourite stuff. If you have a mac, find a friend with a large music library on iTunes and set up home sharing, then you can borrow all their stuff and just see what you get on with. If you listen to music on your phone, when you hear something you like, take a screen shot so you can remember to download it later. Sign up for Spotify and try anything. Trawl charity shops for cheap CDs.

    And above all: ENJOY! There’s an amazing world of music out there. Some of it’s rubbish, a lot of it is bland and unimaginitive, but some of it will change your life and lift your soul.



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  • 77
    Hugh Jampton says:

    In reply to #68 by Skeptic:

    Put on ‘Dark Side of the Moon’ with headphones and the lights out and your life will be transformed

    Amen!



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  • 79
    Maxi-pad says:

    Queen, Pink Floyd, The Doors, Eric Clapton, Ellie Goulding, MGMT, Muse, Mars Volta, No Doubt, Passion Pit, Peter Gabriel, Pink Martini, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Air, The Album Leaf, Frank Sinatra, Dinah Washington, Billie Holiday, Sade, Enya.

    Look up Rick Wakeman’s ‘Journey To The Center Of The Earth’ put on headphones or very loud surround sound just like ‘The Dark Side of The Moon or ”The Wall.’



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  • 80
    mralstoner says:

    Best of Both Worlds – Van Halen

    “Well you don’t have to die and go to heaven,
    or hang around to be born again.
    Just tune in to what this place has got to offer,
    ’cause we may never be here again”.

    Rock on!



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  • 81
    thebear250 says:

    Music is music. Whether you like a certain type is up to you. Were you prevented from listening to all “secular” music? Including Beethoven, Brahms, Wagner, et al?? The Roman Catholic Mass is a “sacred” form of music though it has evolved over the years from the plainchant or Gregorian chant at the turn of the century, to this bile that they play in the pulpit now days. You should listen to music of the early Renaissance, specifically Palestrina. He was one of the greatest composers for the Roman Catholic Church and wrote countless Masses.

    I am not sure what has happened to sacred music, but it surely has cheapened to its present form. The actual mass itself is a musical form. In fact, Johannes Brahms wrote a Requiem Mass (Called Ein Deutsches Requiem, A German Requiem, that I highly recommend) that was nearly secular in nature. Hundreds of composers have written in the Mass form and not intended it necessarily for worship so much as for musical enjoyment: Bach, Handel, Mozart, Verdi, Brahms, Bernstein, et al. Music is music. I have found it does not care whether it is sacred or secular. When you listen to something that you are enjoying, the same rush of dopamine you experience in sex can also be released from listening to music. The question that I have asked that I believe you should be asking is this: How would music have evolved differently without the influence of the church and religion? For hundreds of years the Roman Catholic Church dominated the western world including music. There was indeed secular music of the time: the Troubadores and Trouveres of France, the Minnesingers and the Meistersingers of Germany, the golliards written in Italy, music was everywhere even outside of the Church. I am sure this secular music was regarded as “sinful” at the time, but these groups of people were masters of music. What if the musical world was dominated by them instead of the pope? But then again, the church played an important role in preserving its music. Our records of medieval secular music are no where near as strong as the sacred. How might things have been different?

    I recommend you explore music without the notion of sacred or secular: music doesn’t care. It speaks with the ASSISTANCE of words, but not necessarily through the words themselves. Music is its own language. It doesn’t need words; it doesn’t care about words; the words only help to accompany its nature and intentions. With that said, christian music is just bad, regardless of what it says. I think we can all agree with that. The MUSIC itself is simply crap. That is why it doesn’t and will never truly speak to us. While I enjoy music in the popular world, it doesn’t speak to me quite as much as music in an artistic nature. The ways it achieves effect are different. Popular music is like the quick fix. Artistic (not Classical, this is a time period, not a genre, but you can disagree if you like) music is an acquired taste (like Guiness for some people) because it lacks the first impression appeal. It takes thought, it takes focus, because it does not directly tell you what it’s saying. That is for you to interpret, to figure out. It is a language that speaks a thousand languages. When you find how to love it and understand it, you reap the rewards far more with it than with the “quick fix.” Anyway, that’s my 2 cents. Enjoy music for what it is! I am a composer, and I study this stuff every day. That’s why I have this rant, and I apologize for writing an entire novel on this comment section.



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