New Zealand Charter schools won’t teach creationism

Sep 18, 2013

Creationism won't be taught in the new charter schools due to be operating next year. 


Two of the five schools green lighted by the Government do have a Christian focus. 

But Minister of Education Hekia Parata says creationism will not be taught in any of the schools the Government has approved. 

"We've had very clear requirements of them. 

"While two of the schools have made it clear that faith is a part of their approach, they have based these explicitly on Christian ethics, but they're all delivering the New Zealand Curriculum or Te Marautanga o Aotearoa."

Written By: Katie Bradford-Crozier, Philippa Ormrod, and Felix Marwick
continue to source article at newstalkzb.co.nz

0 comments on “New Zealand Charter schools won’t teach creationism

  • 1
    Reckless Monkey says:

    What a load of rubbish. Ask any teacher how often someone comes into their class to check up on them. The government will not know until its too late and many children have been taught rubbish. Do people care so little about the education of the next generation that they will allow their governments to divest themselves of their responsibility to educate and maintain standards?



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  • 2
    Johnny_O says:

    Reckless Monkey, there is the real likelyhood that some of the kids would report it. My daughter did so to me, with a substitute teacher who mentioned God a bit too often in the class and recently several children, across several schools, (in the UK), reported Catholic literature that was being handed out.

    So I’d be confident that they’d be found out.



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  • 3
    Cairsley says:

    This issue, which has been going on in New Zealand for some time now, has been very confusingly reported. On the one hand it is reported that charter schools will teach the national curriculum, and on the other hand that each charter school can do whatever it likes. If doing whatever it likes just means applying a particular educational philosophy or method, or establishing a particular cultural milieu in the school, or teaching a particular subject in a suitable school ethos, around the teaching of the national curriculum, then perhaps charter schools will provide parents with more choices of types of schools to send their children to. Perhaps some charter schools will prove to be more successful with certain types of pupils who are at present failing to gain an education at the country’s more standard type of schools. Time will tell.



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  • 4
    Stafford Gordon says:

    Prima facie this is good news, but, I fear that Metiria Turei is correct.

    Religionists have a track record as long as Pinoccio’s nose for delusional dissembling, and youngsters in these schools could well have their education jeopardized.

    In a word, it’s too good to be true; although I hope it is.



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  • In reply to #3 by Cairsley:

    Time will tell.

    Indeed it will. Unfortunately, whilst it would no doubt be of great academic interest (no pun intended), this is the actual education of real children that’s being played with.

    To be honest, I really don’t envy anyone who has to set education policy – even with the best intentions, a slip up can produce a whole decade’s worth of school leavers whose education has been adversely affected.



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  • The liars for jeebus are at it again. They’ll get caught out.

    An Xtian focus? Would that really look something like this:-

    In the tutorial, xtian ethics will kick off with the justification of eternal damnation, xenophobia, murder, genocide, rape, incest and an expository of a list of 10 reasons why it is OK to kill somebody. Class to discuss why homosexuality didn’t make this list but making graven images and working on Saturday did.

    Last supper lunch, pretending you can predict peoples behaviour and practising giving bread to treacherous classmates

    After break they’ll do arts and crafts (weaving crowns of thorns) carpentry (making crosses) and construction (erecting crosses)

    Optional curriculum

    Anger management (Smashing up money changing tables in temples, kicking Pharisees arses)
    Economics (gambling for dead people’s clothing)
    Health & fitness (how to survive a crucifixion in less than 3 hours by feigning death)
    Environmental studies (cursing of fig trees).



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  • 7
    ikinmoore says:

    Creationism is a religious doctrine which should Never be allow in a classroom. In the UK, I doubt this would ever be an issue in a state run school unless you are a faith school.



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  • 8
    Reckless Monkey says:

    In reply to #2 by Johnny_O:

    Reckless Monkey, there is the real likelyhood that some of the kids would report it. My daughter did so to me, with a substitute teacher who mentioned God a bit too often in the class and recently several children, across several schools, (in the UK), reported Catholic literature that was being handed out.

    So I’d be confident that they’d be found out.

    Hi Jonny_O:
    I’m sure in some cases you would be right, however even in public schools we have this rubbish showing up in classes or a de-emphasis on teaching evolution properly. I have recounted before how as a science teacher I found I could not find a text book at my school that (a public school) mentioned evolution by name or even Charles Darwin, this is to cater directly to these sorts of school who won’t buy a textbook that talks about evolution directly but kind of goes around it. I know of teachers who bring up their personal views in state schools about evolution (in the science class while dealing with evolution) I personally had a biology teacher who did this I snapped at him at the time (little bugger that I was). Let’s say a Mulsim school or a fundamentalist Church of the Ken Ham flavour is granted a licence to set up one of these schools do you really think they will give evolution a fair go? Even if they are found out will they be shut down? There is a lot of inertia that happens when these things are allowed, either governments need to spend a lot of money checking up on them or they need to be prepared to shut them down. I very much doubt many government will have the political will to do so, if they did why would they be handing over their responsibilities to others in the first place?



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  • 10
    Light Wave says:

    This week in BBC news – two head teachers were sacked here in UK for allowing creationist bullshit pamphlets in their schools…
    Yes ! Rational logic wins over ‘religious’ crap….at last we are getting the idiots who call themselves educators sacked…..



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  • 11
    Alan4discussion says:

    In reply to #10 by Light Wave:

    This week in BBC news – two head teachers were sacked here in UK for allowing creationist bullshit pamphlets in their schools…
    Yes ! Rational logic wins over ‘religious’ crap….at last we are getting the idiots who call themselves educators sacked…..

    They have been suspended and redeployed but it is a move in the right direction!

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/10307520/Head-teachers-removed-in-row-over-creationist-church.html

    Alexandra MacKenzie, and her deputy Elizabeth Mockus, have been assigned other duties while an inquiry is carried out into the involvement of the fundamentalist Christian sect over a period of eight years at Kirktonholme Primary in East Kilbride.

    Officials at South Lanarkshire Council said they wanted to establish why the Church of Christ group, which does not believe in evolution and condemns homosexual relationships, had been allowed to provide chaplaincy for eight years.

    The local authority issued a statement confirming that the teachers had been replaced and given other roles in the council while the inquiry was conducted.

    The investigation was launched following complaints by parents after children took home two creationist books, How Do You Know God is Real?, and Exposing the Myth of Evolution, which they had been given at assembly.

    Mrs MacKenzie defended the decision to give the books to pupils in a letter, saying: “While I appreciate that not every family in our school are practising Christians, I was only too happy to accept this generous gift on your behalf. I hope you will all accept it in the spirit with which it was offered.”

    However, angry parents called at a public meeting for the teachers to be sacked, some threatened to remove their children from the primary school and one father said the books were an attempt to “brainwash” children.

    Jim Gilhooly, the council’s director of education, has now told parents that a “full investigation” into management practices at the school has been instigated.

    He added: “In order to assist with this, the current head teachers have been removed from the school and redeployed to other duties within education resources, with immediate effect. A temporary senior management team has been put in place.

    “The council will continue to work with the parents to ensure that Kirktonholme Primary School now moves forward with educating and caring for the community’s children.”

    In a letter to parents, Mr Gilhooly also said that the West Mains Church of Christ would no longer be allowed to run a Monday evening youth club “or any other activity” at the school and other schools in the area.

    Reckless Monkey @1 – What a load of rubbish. Ask any teacher how often someone comes into their class to check up on them.

    A good point! Eight years to catch on to what was going on – and in a Scottish school where parents object to creationism!



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