Scientist controls colleague’s hand in first human brain-to-brain interface

Sep 2, 2013

University of Washington researcher Rajesh Rao sends a brain signal to Andrea Stocco via the Internet, causing Stocco's right hand to move on a keyboard.


The telepathic cyborg lives, sort of. University of Washington scientists Rajesh Rao and Andrea Stocco claim that they are the first to demonstrate human brain-to-brain communication. Rao sent a signal into a Stocco's brain via the Internet that caused him to move his right hand. Brain-to-brain communication has previously been demonstrated between rats and from humans to rats.

"The experiment is a proof in concept. We have tech to reverse engineer the brain signal and transmit it from one brain to another via computer," said Chantel Prat, an assistant professor of psychology who worked on the project.

In a press release, the experiment was described as follows:

The team had a Skype connection set up so the two labs could coordinate, though neither Rao nor Stocco could see the Skype screens. Rao looked at a computer screen and played a simple video game with his mind. When he was supposed to fire a cannon at a target, he imagined moving his right hand (being careful not to actually move his hand), causing a cursor to hit the "fire" button. Almost instantaneously, Stocco, who wore noise-canceling earbuds and wasn't looking at a computer screen, involuntarily moved his right index finger to push the space bar on the keyboard in front of him, as if firing the cannon. Stocco compared the feeling of his hand moving involuntarily to that of a nervous tic.

Written By: Dan Farber
continue to source article at news.cnet.com

0 comments on “Scientist controls colleague’s hand in first human brain-to-brain interface

  • 2
    Russ Morrison says:

    This is a tremendously important breakthrough for those who are in a deep coma, but still have strong brain activity. This could potentially be a way of leading those who are trapped back to the surface. I look forward to further reports on this type of research.



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  • The message on the Internet could have been “Move your right hand”. It should have been a little clearer how the message was encoded and interpreted.

    Dr. Frank N Furter did this first in 1975.



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  • 5
    memetical says:

    Dear Steve. Nah. What would be really impressive is if our English comic genius Steven Fry could control Putin’s future ‘casting’ vote in the Russian ‘DUMA’. . .

    FRY: “Up and down . . . up and down. . . smiling gaily as we go.” “Now Vlad, wasn’t that much more like sincere, humane law-making and sincere moral leadership. . .Sochi, here we come!” 😉 m

    _ In reply to #1 by Agrajag:_

    I’ll be really impressed when one guy can make the other cross himself. 😉

    Steve



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  • 6
    Alan4discussion says:

    When he was supposed to fire a cannon at a target, he imagined moving his right hand (being careful not to actually move his hand), causing a cursor to hit the “fire” button. Almost instantaneously, Stocco, who wore noise-canceling earbuds and wasn’t looking at a computer screen, involuntarily moved his right index finger to push the space bar on the keyboard in front of him,

    How long will it take for this to be adapted to allow “brain-dead” politicians to push a button and register an electronic vote during debates?

    A modified version could have them raise their right hands or grunt during smaller meetings!



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