8 Summer Miseries Made Worse by Global Warming, From Poison Ivy to Allergies

Jul 5, 2014

By Brian Clark Howard

 

With average global temperatures expected to rise more than 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) over the coming decades, a new report from a leading U.S. environmental group warns that future summers are likely to be filled with more misery, from more prolific poison ivy and biting insects to worsened air and water quality and impacts on tourism.

“Summer has always been a time many people look forward to, but climate change is causing more and more threats that we need to be mindful of,” says Kim Knowlton, a co-author of the new report and senior scientist with the New York-based Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC).

“We see more than ever that climate change is affecting people’s health here and now in the U.S.,” says Knowlton, who was also a lead author of the White House’s National Climate Assessment that was released in May and is an assistant clinical professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health in New York. (See “Federal Climate Report Highlights Risks for Americans.”)

The elderly, children, and those with existing circulatory and respiratory conditions are most at risk, she adds.

NRDC’s new report builds on recent scientific and policy findings, including the peer-reviewed National Climate Assessment, which argued that climate change is already resulting in substantial financial, public health, and ecological costs, from increasingly severe weather to disruption of infrastructure. The report pointed to droughts in the West and flood-based damage to roads in the East, in particular.

report released in late June by a bipartisan committee of U.S. political and business leaders warned that climate change over the next century threatens extensive property damage from catastrophic flooding and sea-level rise, dangerous heat waves, and severe disruption of agriculture in the American corn belt and Southeast. (See “5 Dire Warnings From Bipartisan Report on Climate Change.”)

And in August 2013, a study published in Science warned that wars, murders, and other acts of violence will likely become more commonplace in coming decades as the effects of global warmingcause tempers to flare worldwide.

Added to this list of risks are eight trends that may make summers more miserable—and potentially more dangerous—thanks to global warming. “They will get worse unless we take serious actions to combat climate change,” the NRDC report says.

The group adds that President Obama’s Climate Action Plan, which includes new limits on carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants, is a “great start.”

The increased summer risks include:

1. Heat Waves

“Summers have always been hot, but they’re getting hotter,” says Knowlton. Specifically, the NRDC report warns that climate change will make heat waves longer, hotter, and more frequent.

Eight of the nine warmest years since recordkeeping began in 1880 have occurred since 2000, the report notes. “May 2014 was the hottest May ever. And temperatures could be hotter by 4 to 11 degrees Fahrenheit by 2100.”

NRDC also warns that heat is the leading weather-related killer in the United States, killing people directly through heat stroke and indirectly by exacerbating conditions such as heart and respiratory disease.

The bipartisan report released in June had noted that heat waves are likely to be especially strong in the Southwest, Southeast, and upper Midwest.

“By the middle of this century, the average American will likely see 27 to 50 days over 95°F each year—two to more than three times the average annual number of 95°F days we’ve seen over the past 30 years,” that report warned. “By the end of this century, this number will likely reach 45 to 96 days over 95°F each year on average.”

2. Bad Air Days

“With climate change, days will be hotter and that will amp up ground-level ozone smog pollution and increase the number of ‘bad air days,'” the NRDC report cautions.

This will result in more respiratory irritations and will exacerbate problems among those who already suffer from asthma, a population of 27 million Americans.

3. Biting Insects

The report warns that climate change “may create more favorable conditions for the spread of disease-carrying insects.”

4 comments on “8 Summer Miseries Made Worse by Global Warming, From Poison Ivy to Allergies

  • @OP – The report warns that climate change “may create more favorable conditions for the spread of disease-carrying insects.”

    Including malarial mosquitoes moving into present more temperate climates.



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  • I’m not a global warming denyer, but this sort of article (and there are many others like it) does the subject no good at all. Firstly, why does every story about global warming have to be a dire warning – I know, species have evolved (including humans) to suit a normal temperature range and rapid change in either direction will not be good – but if we have warmer winters, then won’t less people die from cold in the winter? And I don’t want to hear that actually, winters are going to get colder for some reason at the same time that summers get hotter … because no one knows.

    I’m afraid, anyone can see this article is an extrapolation from some fanciful scientific models to create headlines and will just confirm people’s bias, that the global warming lobby is at it again.

    Secondly, I thought “eight of the nine warmest years since record keeping began” were in the 1990s … or some very similar statistic? If that stat was true and so is this one about the 2000s, then wouldn’t that mean 16 of the hottest years in the last 100 have occurred in the last 24 – a much bigger statistic, but not mentioned. So these claims now wash over me.

    There is a real danger that climate science will go the same way as environmental concerns generally – Greenpeace et al think they have to shout loudly to get our attention, but unfortunately end up shouting wolf a bit too often.



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  • 3
    Landcruiser says:

    @GPWC “I know, species have evolved (including humans) to suit a normal temperature range and rapid change in either direction will not be good”

    Well the simple answer to that is that evolution takes 1000s to Millions of years not a blink.

    “but if we have warmer winters, then won’t less people die from cold in the winter?” Except, of course, humans are not the only thing that occupies this planet. Our food is dependent on a functioning ecosystem, a system that will come under great pressure if the niche it occupies changes considerably. Trees and plants evolve slowly too you know and they can’t get up and walk to a more conducive climate. Why is it people fail to grasp a much larger picture that involves a world in symbiosis.



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  • GPWC

    I know, species have evolved (including humans) to suit a normal temperature range and rapid change in either direction will not be good – but if we have warmer winters, then won’t less people die from cold in the winter?

    That may be so, but less insect pests and disease organisms die off as well, so it is not that simple. Tropical diseases are extending their ranges towards the poles.

    And I don’t want to hear that actually, winters are going to get colder for some reason at the same time that summers get hotter … because no one knows.

    With a warming climate and greater atmospheric movement, both can happen, but not in the same place at the same time.

    I’m afraid, anyone can see this article is an extrapolation from some fanciful scientific models to create headlines and will just confirm people’s bias, that the global warming lobby is at it again.

    A more energetic atmosphere moves heat and weather around more fiercely, so “more of everything”, rapid changes, and more extremes, are to be expected.

    Secondly, I thought “eight of the nine warmest years since record keeping began” were in the 1990s … or some very similar statistic? If that stat was true and so is this one about the 2000s, then wouldn’t that mean 16 of the hottest years in the last 100 have occurred in the last 24 – a much bigger statistic, but not mentioned.

    Headlines often confuse figures on local, national, or global figures in the search for sensationalism. A record year in one place is not the same as a record year globally.

    Much of The UK had one of the mildest winters on record last year, and one of the coldest Decembers on record the previous year.

    The West of the USA is at present having droughts, while the East is having floods. Media headlines often have little to do with the accuracy of the scientific measurements on which they claim to be based.



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