How Gorilla Poop Could Help Stop Ebola

Sep 23, 2014

By Lois Parshley

 

Police drove through Kroo Bay this morning, past the open sewers and snuffling pigs, yelling at people to go inside—largely to no avail. All the 14,000 residents of the shanty town in Freeport, Sierra Leone, had been ordered to stay indoors for three days, to try to stop the spread of Ebola.

Sierra Leone’s attempted lockdown is unprecedented: The whole country has been placed on house arrest and 20,000 volunteers have been recruited to help identify suspected Ebola carriers. “Some of the things we are asking you to do are difficult, but life is better than these difficulties,” President Ernest Bai Koroma said.

Nothing about controlling the spread of the virus has come easy. Yesterday, the bodies of eight people, part of a delegation of health officials and journalists, were found in a remote village in Guinea, apparently killed by people throwing rocks. Health workers around the region, including in Liberia and Sierra Leone, have been physically threatened by misinformed people who fear they are actually spreading the disease. In the midst of this widespread panic, the World Health Organization reports that more than 700 new cases were recorded this week; despite all efforts, the outbreak is still growing.

But a rare spot of good news came in the form of a diagnostic test that may help prevent future epidemics. Dr. William Karesh, Executive Vice President for Health and Policy at EcoHealth Alliance and a wildlife veterinarian who has studied Ebola in great apes for years, has discovered a method of detecting Ebola antibodies in feces. Up till now, detection methods in the wild relied on collecting blood or tissue from infected apes, one of the animal reservoirs for the disease. (The direct introduction to humans in this current outbreak is suspected to have come from fruit bats, not apes.) Since collecting poop is much easier than taking blood samples or carting carcasses out of the jungle, this technique can help scientists canvas larger areas and more accurately pinpoint hotspots likely to be at risk for future outbreaks.

4 comments on “How Gorilla Poop Could Help Stop Ebola

  • 1
    NearlyNakedApe says:

    Scientists collect ape shit to save people while the ignorant and superstitious go ape shit and kill the people who are risking their lives to save them. Yet more proof that lies and superstition are anything but harmless.



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  • Of course none of this would work if we did not share common ancestors with Gorillas, fruit bats and so on. Unless of course the intelligent designer designed it to be thus. Then those who believe this probably think punishing everyone is a perfectly reasonable response to homosexuality.



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  • The whole spread of this started because some which doctor used smoke and mirrors to fool people into believing she stop it. She in fact contacted it and died. When people heard this great healer died they came into the city for her funeral and took the disease back home with them.



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  • tiger76 Sep 26, 2014 at 3:01 pm

    The whole spread of this started because some which doctor used smoke and mirrors to fool people into believing she stop it. She in fact contacted it and died. When people heard this great healer died they came into the city for her funeral and took the disease back home with them.

    . . . . . And having learned nothing from this, the disease has now been imported into other African countries as well as medical facilities in the USA and Spain, where there is also no certain cure!



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