NASA’s Chandra Detects Record-Breaking Outburst from Milky Way’s Black Hole

Jan 8, 2015

Image Credit: NASA/CXC/Stanford/I. Zhuravleva et al.

By NASA

Astronomers have observed the largest X-ray flare ever detected from the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way galaxy. This event, detected by NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, raises questions about the behavior of this giant black hole and its surrounding environment.

The supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy, called Sagittarius A*, or Sgr A*, is estimated to contain about 4.5 million times the mass of our sun.

Astronomers made the unexpected discovery while using Chandra to observe how Sgr A* would react to a nearby cloud of gas known as G2.

“Unfortunately, the G2 gas cloud didn’t produce the fireworks we were hoping for when it got close to Sgr A*,” said lead researcher Daryl Haggard of Amherst College in Massachusetts. “However, nature often surprises us and we saw something else that was really exciting.”

On Sept. 14, 2013, Haggard and her team detected an X-ray flare from Sgr A* 400 times brighter than its usual, quiet state. This “megaflare” was nearly three times brighter than the previous brightest X-ray flare from Sgr A* in early 2012. After Sgr A* settled down, Chandra observed another enormous X-ray flare 200 times brighter than usual on Oct. 20, 2014.


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One comment on “NASA’s Chandra Detects Record-Breaking Outburst from Milky Way’s Black Hole”

  • On Sept. 14, 2013, Haggard and her team detected an X-ray flare from Sgr A* 400 times brighter than its usual, quiet state. This “megaflare” was nearly three times brighter than the previous brightest X-ray flare from Sgr A* in early 2012. After Sgr A* settled down, Chandra observed another enormous X-ray flare 200 times brighter than usual on Oct. 20, 2014.

    The area around the black hole at the centre of our galaxy is a place for any future space-farer to avoid (even if travel to that distance was feasible).

    There is fierce radiation from mega-flares, and the “S” stars are scooting about in eccentric orbits which would massively disrupt any planetary systems, they may have, or have had!

    The origin of the s-star cluster at the galactic center
    http://phys.org/news/2013-06-s-star-cluster-galactic-center.html

    Tracking Stars Orbiting the Milky Way’s Central Black Hole
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=duoHtJpo4GY



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