Tsipras Won’t be Sworn In by Archbishop, but will Give Political Oath

Jan 28, 2015

By Philip Chrysopoulos

Syriza leader Alexis Tsipras visits Archbishop Ieronymos this afternoon to inform him that he will not be sworn in by him and will only be taking a political oath.

Tsipras will also inform Ieronymos that he will not be needed in the inauguration swearing-in ceremony of the new government at Maximos Mansion because the oath of cabinet members will be political and not religious.

After the meeting with the Archbishop, the new prime minister will visit President of the Hellenic Republic Karolos Papoulias.


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12 comments on “Tsipras Won’t be Sworn In by Archbishop, but will Give Political Oath

  • What will the oath say ?

    I promise to pay you all back when I’m in heaven ?

    Meanwhile back in Germany, the Christians Democrats are certain that Germany bought Greece, just like the USA bought Alaska !



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  • The Germans should be more cautious, because they might end up with nobody buying their stuff if they let everybody sink… Also, really, the EU has bigger issues to worry about than the debt: look around its borders! It’s infinitely sad that nobody seems to see that.



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  • Well, that’s good news.
    I’m actually very curious to know what and how this new Greek Government will act. The EU is undeniably stuck in a rot with the “debt problem”, since everybody wants it to end but nobody wants to do anything.

    Greece’s next moves might be what the EU needs to move on…



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  • It’s good to see he is not going to brow-beaten by theocrats, despite being in the weakened position of a coalition government.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-31023591
    The newly-elected prime minister of Greece, Alexis Tsipras, has told his first cabinet meeting that the country will not default on its debts.

    The left-wing leader said he wanted to reach a workable, fair and mutually beneficial solution with the eurozone for its €240bn (£179bn; $270bn) bailout.

    It appears that some of the wild claims about finance, were media hype!



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  • The City Council in Victoria in a similar way refused to pledge fealty to the Queen of England.
    The whole notion of an oath makes no sense without a belief in a punishing god. It is effectively saying “I believe god will punish me if I violate this promise.” Otherwise, it is purely ceremonial.

    An oath could also be looked at as promising you are a Christian. Presumably if you were anything else, you would have trouble with the oath. It is a religious test of office. It is announcing team loyalty.

    So logically, I think the whole oath thing should be dropped, and replaced with some other ceremony — e.g. wrapping in the civic flag.

    “By the way, why are we wearing bras on our heads.”
    ~ Wyatt
    “It’s ceremonial”
    ~ Gary

    ~ Weird Science with Anthony Michael Hall as Gary Wallace and Ilan Mitchell-Smith as Wyatt
    Donnelly



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  • “By the way, why are we wearing bras on our heads.” ~ Wyatt
    “It’s ceremonial” ~ Gary

    Ha!

    I’m interested by the number of academics in Tsipras’ new cabinet. Can we expect rational rather than intuitional policy decisions?



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  • Respect for not taking an oath of duty to a non existent entity. Tick rational.

    However there is a culture in Greece that reflects upon democracy and its ability to deliver tough decisions. This old statement sums up the Greek collective personal.

    “A democracy is always temporary in nature; it simply cannot exist as a permanent form of government. A democracy will continue to exist up until the time that the voters discover that they can vote themselves generous gifts from the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates who promise the most benefits from the public treasury, with the result that every democracy will finally collapse over loose fiscal policy, (which is) always followed by a dictatorship.”

    And it applies to Australia. Through Prime Ministers Hawke, Keating, Howard, Rudd, Gillard and Rudd again, and now Tony Abbott, a global warming denier, the voters of Australia have voted for the biggest tax cuts. We’re now paying a billion a month in interest and going backwards and trying to solve the problem by cutting services. Don’t get sick in Australia. What we need is a broad based consumption tax, enforce corporate tax on the corruption of free enterprise and raise income tax. Vote for me, I will do all of the above. Now refer again to the quote above.



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  • David R Allen Jan 29, 2015 at 5:56 pm

    A democracy will continue to exist up until the time that the voters discover that they can vote themselves generous gifts from the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates who promise the most benefits from the public treasury, with the result that every democracy will finally collapse over loose fiscal policy,

    This reminds me of a local “independent Liberal Councillor” who was re-elected for years.
    As a party which had a minority of one, – On every issue, she could quite happily tell her voters of her proposals to have more of everything, and how the “mean” majority party had deprived them of this by agreeing on less.

    At the same time, her happy voters, really appreciated her opposition to raising tax money to pay for anything, while that “mean” majority suggested they would collectively need to pay for the local services.

    In opposition, it is easy for disingenuous dissenting politicians to play on the cognitive biases of wish-thinkers like this!

    There are other minorities, who will oppose or abstain from, anything which might look unpopular, and then circulate literature claiming the decisions were nothing to do with them!

    That’s democracy for the gullible! “Elect monkeys – live in the jungle” (apologies to monkeys).



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