Slovak opposition wants separation of church and state

Feb 17, 2015

By Czech News Agency

Slovak liberals are calling for the separation of church and state, talks on treaties with the Vatican, and a discussion of registered partnership following the failed referendum Saturday on the so-called protection of the traditional family, Czech daily Právo writes today.

Only 21.4 percent of voters took part in the referendum, while 50 percent is required for a plebiscite to be valid.

According to the results, most of the participants expressed themselves against child adoption by homosexuals, for the term of marriage exclusively applying to a union between a man and a woman, and against the compulsory attendance of lessons on sexual education and euthanasia.

The liberals say the 21 percent turnout in the referendum has refuted the myth of a conservative Slovakia, Právo writes.

It writes that Richard Sulík, chairman of the opposition Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) party, has said the plebiscite showed that the influence of the Catholic Church in Slovakia is much weaker than it may have seemed.


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13 comments on “Slovak opposition wants separation of church and state

  • The majority (62%) of Slovaks belong to the Roman Catholic Church with an 4% of Greek Catholics.

    The country still follows the Catholic party line. I would hazard a guess those that did vote voted based on tradition without thinking the issues through.



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  • The painting, of St. Martins’ cathedral in Bratislava, also shows admirable separation of the ruling classes and the great unwashed, with the military to make sure they stay in their proper place, and stay seperated.

    A social circumstance also enthusiastically endorsed by the Catholic church.



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  • I am so glad that referendum failed. Unfortunately it did not in Croatia, not so long ago. But there is something very strange about the associations that are advocating those referendums. In Slovakia this association is called “Alliance For Family”, and look coincidence so is the one in Croatia. In croatian this is “inicijativa u ime obitelji” and in slovak language is “aliancia za rodinu”. Two religious associations with a same name with inhuman advocacy.

    Those two associations have similar logos,… you can see it here: https://www.facebook.com/UImeObitelji , and here http://www.alianciazarodinu.sk/english/ .

    Is Vatican creating this associations? It would be interesting to see are there any other associations in Europe (even wider) with similar or equal names.



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  • Why was not my comment published I do not know, but here it is again.

    I am glad that referendum in Slovakia failed. The one in croatia did not. But there is an interesting coincidence regarding associations who organised those referendums. They have the same name “Alliance for family”, and very similar logos. (in slovak language: aliancia za rodinu; and in croatian: inicijativa u ime obitelji).

    Is Vatican behind it? Those associations are religious. They are registered as civil, but they are political arm of catholics. Are there other associations “for family” in other countries?



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  • Why was not my comment published I do not know

    Comments containing links are normally put aside by the system, pending moderator approval. No need to repost them – as soon as a moderator is on the site, we will approve the comment, assuming the link isn’t spam.

    The mods



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  • It’s the same in Ireland, here it’s called the Iona Institute, after an abbey in Scotland. founded by an Irish monk Saint Columba (Irish: Colm Cille), in AD 563. Their theology has not advanced much since then, being reactionary in the extreme, and mostly devoted to sexual and reproductive issues.

    I have always believed that it is a front organisation for Opus Dei, favourite organisation of John Paul 2, though the fact is that like good Leninists, they do not leave evidence lying around. They are a shadowy organisation, superb publicists and they can spin issues in a way that would make Shane Warne jealous. Currently they’re at war with marriage equality, and recently they have been active in countering abortion legislation.

    Owing to the media rules in Europe, they gain a good deal of time on radio and TV, because of the entirely correct insistance on balanced reporting and discussion. Sometimes this can lead to flat earthers and creationists being given equal time, but i suppose that on the whole it’s a price worth paying for not having a European version of Fox news.



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  • Thank You eejit. I had no idea that vatican is undermining societies forming this “civil” associations. Actually, I have heard that Opus dei exist in Croatia the same time when this “alliance for family” appeared, so perhaps there is some link after all. Now I am very interesting in this “mafia” ways of conduct of the catholic church.



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  • Modesti Feb 18, 2015 at 3:22 am

    I am so glad that referendum failed. Unfortunately it did not in Croatia, not so long ago. But there is something very strange about the associations that are advocating those referendums. In Slovakia this association is called “Alliance For Family”, and look coincidence so is the one in Croatia. In croatian this is “inicijativa u ime obitelji” and in slovak language is “aliancia za rodinu”. Two religious associations with a same name with inhuman advocacy.

    Of course the real agenda is “RELIGIOUS DOMINATION OF THE FAMILY”, with these allegedly “independent” organisations pretending, just like “True Science”, and Ken Ham’s AIG, pretend to be promoting “Real science”!



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  • It is not clear what percentage of Slovak population belongs to which religion. All we can say is that according to the census, the figures are as you mentioned. That, however, is not relevant for measuring of actual religiosity of the people. The thing is (that is my opinion), that the vast majority of those claiming to belong to any religion are just “cultural christians” – meaning they were baptized so but they are not “active” believers. They do not go to church (except the rare occasions of weddings, Chirstmas Eve, etc) and they do not believe in any particular god (sure, they are supersticious and believing in odd things).



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  • Modesti Feb 18, 2015 at 3:46 am

    Oh, fuck is this it:

    http://w2.vatican.va/content/benedict-xvi/en/speeches/2008/may/documents/hf_ben-xvi_spe_20080516_associazioni-familiari.html

    It looks like the usual double-talk, self-contradiction, of brain addled faith-thinking, which on the one hand claims of their dogmas :-

    “These are not principles that derive from a confession of faith but rather from the application of justice that respects every person’s rights.

    and then continues with:-

    This is your mission, dear Christian families! May you never lack trust in the Lord and communion with him in prayer and in the constant reference to his Word.”

    . . . having said this earlier:-

    This is why the story of the union of life and love between a man and a woman in the covenant of marriage was used by God as a symbol of salvation history. For this very reason, the union of life and love based on the marriage between a man and a woman, which constitutes the family, is an indispensable good for society as a whole and must not be confused or likened to other types of union.



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  • As I say, it is a Leninist tactic, also employed in the Irish war of independence. The inner party, in this case Opus Dei, spawns a plethora of organisations, which engage in public debate. Generally they seem to have no connection to each other, but they are all joined at the root to the secretive parent.

    In all the turmoil relating to abortion in this country, Opus Dei have not uttered a word of which I am aware, surely an indication that the several organisations which are in the debate on the anti-abortion side, are speaking for their secretive masters. It’s about time that the media in Ireland investigated the situation.



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