Rogue Antimatter Found in Thunderclouds

May 31, 2015

By Davide Castelvecchi

When Joseph Dwyer’s aeroplane took a wrong turn into a thundercloud, the mistake paid off: the atmospheric physicist flew not only through a frightening storm but also into an unexpected—and mysterious—haze of antimatter.

Although powerful storms have been known to produce positrons—the antimatter versions of electrons—the antimatter observed by Dwyer and his team cannot be explained by any known processes, they say. “This was so strange that we sat on this observation for several years,” says Dwyer, who is at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.

The flight took place six years ago, but the team is only now reporting the result (J. R. Dwyer et al. J. Plasma Phys.; in the press). “The observation is a puzzle,” says Michael Briggs, a physicist at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, who was not involved in the report.

A key feature of antimatter is that when a particle of it makes contact with its ordinary-matter counterpart, both are instantly transformed into other particles in a process known as annihilation. This makes antimatter exceedingly rare. However, it has long been known that positrons are produced by the decay of radioactive atoms and by astrophysical phenomena, such as cosmic rays plunging into the atmosphere from outer space. In the past decade, research by Dwyer and others has shown that storms also produce positrons, as well as highly energetic photons, or γ-rays.


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5 comments on “Rogue Antimatter Found in Thunderclouds

  • @OP- link To that end, he and others are sending balloons straight into the most violent storms, and the US National Science Foundation even plans to fly a particle detector on an A-10 ‘Warthog’—an armoured anti-tank plane that could withstand the extreme environment. “The insides of thunder­storms are like bizarre landscapes that we have barely begun to explore,” says Dwyer.

    There are certainly high energies being discharged in thunderstorms, which are not well understood.

    Perhaps if cosmic rays, or plasma from space is involved, that could explain some of the effects seen in Sprites , Elves and Blue Jets.

    http://www.nssl.noaa.gov/education/svrwx101/lightning/types/



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  • 2
    NearlyNakedApe says:

    Fascinating stuff…

    the US National Science Foundation even plans to fly a particle detector on an A-10 ‘Warthog’—an armoured anti-tank plane that could withstand the extreme environment.

    I tip my hat in advance to the pilot capable of flying in such an environment without tossing his/her cookies or dying of a heart attack.



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  • I think that when an article refers to a scientific paper, it would be nice to see a link to that scientific paper as a reference at the bottom…

    There is a link at the end of the article. It’s next to the word ‘source’ in an orange box and says ‘scientific american’.



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