An Open Letter to Okla. Attorney General Scott Pruitt on the Ten Commandments

Jul 1, 2015

by Andrew L. Seidel

Dear Mr. Pruitt:

We’ve tangled several times before. Once regarding a Christian men’s club using Oklahoma public schools to distribute their particular version of the bible, an illegal act that you publicly defended. And then regarding your demand to see documents relating to the IRS and FFRF settling a lawsuit that are publicly available on FFRF’s website, www.ffrf.org. Perhaps you were so upset by the news that the IRS would enforce the rules by which it is governed that you missed all the documents. If so, here they are.

I write this letter to correct yet another misunderstanding, this time regarding the Ten Commandments. After the Oklahoma Supreme Court declared the decalogue monument on capitol grounds unconstitutional, you said, “Quite simply, the Oklahoma Supreme Court got it wrong. The court completely ignored the profound historical impact of the Ten Commandments on the foundation of Western law.”

That assertion is indefensible. There is not a single legal principle that is either unique or original to the Ten Commandments that significantly influenced American law.

First, let’s identify which set of Ten Commandments that were allegedly part of our foundation. Is it the set in Exodus 20 or Exodus 34? Or perhaps it’s the sets in Deuteronomy 5 or Deuteronomy 27? For the sake of argument, I’ll assume it’s the set on the Oklahoma capitol lawn.


Read the full letter by clicking the name of the source located below.

9 comments on “An Open Letter to Okla. Attorney General Scott Pruitt on the Ten Commandments

  • What would Christians say if Muslims or Hindus started putting up monuments in court houses, handing out tracts in schools, insisted their theology be taught in science class? They would be outraged. We have separation of church and state! You can’t go shoving someone else’s religion down my kid’s throats! EXACTLY. To many people, Christianity is “someone else’s religion”.

    People honour the ten commandments without reading them. Most make no sense. Not even Christians obey them. For example, the entire economy is based on coveting. If people did not buy stuff their neighbours have the economy would collapse. Sunday shopping is hardly a capital offense. You should not honour sexually abusive parents.



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  • OSC declared the monument on Capitol grounds unconstitutional

    I think some credit should be given to Lucien Greaves (Satanic Temple), who built his own statue to counter-point / push the issue by saying o.k. OK, all or nothing then.



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  • Yes, so it seems from “our side”. But for the adressee? I’d bet he doesn’t even read it.
    Or have one of his staff read it to him. Just dismiss as more crap from a known hostile.

    I mean, yes, it’s a gratifying read, and very well written, but I’d expect it to fall on deaf ears.



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  • I’ve read various compilations of the decalogue; they’re peppered all over the place in a typical pick and mix fashion.

    Commandments need to be emphatic, not open to interpretation.

    And who needs to be told not to kill, steal and rape?

    Oh, I’ve just heard on the news that those who stoned a woman to death at a Muslim shrine, then ran her body over and set it alight, have been acqitted of murder; I think that answers the question quite nicely.



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  • Stafford Gordon
    Jul 2, 2015 at 3:16 am

    Oh, I’ve just heard on the news that those who stoned a woman to death at a Muslim shrine, then ran her body over and set it alight, have been acqitted of murder;

    That was the impression from misleading headlines, but actually they had their death sentences commuted to imprisonment.

    What is a disgrace, is that the “Keeper of the Holy Shrine”, who put them up to it was acquitted!!



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  • OHooligan
    Jul 1, 2015 at 11:33 pm

    Yes, so it seems from “our side”. But for the adressee? I’d bet he doesn’t even read it.

    It’s an “open letter”, so others who read it are likely to ask questions about it.

    He will read it, if only to make up some plausible dismissal that appeals to the deluded!



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  • 8
    NearlyNakedApe says:

    Scott Pruitt is yet another example of US government officials who delude themselves into the asinine belief that “God’s law supercedes US law”. This kind of thinking goes so much against the very principle of the US constitution and what the founding fathers intended that it borders on treason. Especially coming from an attorney general whose job is to know the law and uphold the law.

    It is an example of inexcusable incompetence and gross abuse of power. People like him should not only be stopped, they should go to jail or at the very least get fired.



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