Oklahoma’s Ten Commandments case is part of an age-old battle in U.S.

Jul 14, 2015

by Natalie Schachar

The Oklahoma Supreme Court ruling last week that a Ten Commandments monument must be removed from the grounds of the state Capitol prompted outrage, drew praise and posed a question: Will controversy over religious displays ever end?

For many legal scholars, the outsize role that religion plays in America made the possibility unlikely.

“It’s a symbolic fight about how people understand their country,” said Charles Haynes, director of the Religious Freedom Center in Washington.

“There are very many Americans who believe that unless we acknowledge our roots and Christian tradition as a country, we will fail,” he said, pointing to Oklahoma. “This is one of a number of efforts that have been made over the course of our history to reassert that understanding of America.”

The Oklahoma case was not the first involving the Ten Commandments.


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12 comments on “Oklahoma’s Ten Commandments case is part of an age-old battle in U.S.

  • @OP – “There are very many Americans who believe that unless we acknowledge our roots and Christian tradition as a country, we will fail,” he said, pointing to Oklahoma. “This is one of a number of efforts that have been made over the course of our history to reassert that understanding of America.”

    I don’t think many native Americans recognised any “roots and Christian traditions” prior to Columbus in 1492!!!



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  • It would seem to me that the traditional worship of some gods is still prevalent – particularly in the the southern US – despite claims of Xtian exclusivity!

    Ahuiateteo, gods of excess
    Macuiltochtli, god of excess.
    Atlacoya, goddess of drought.
    Tezcatzoncatl, god of wine.
    Tlilhua, god of wine.
    Toltecatl, god of wine.
    Tepoztecatl, god of wine.
    Mixcoatl, god of war and hunting.
    Tezcatzoncatl, god of wine.
    Xipe Totec, god of force, patron of war, agriculture, vegetation, diseases, seasons, rebirth, hunting, trades and spring, the lord of the East.
    Yacatecuhtli, god of commerce and bartering.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Aztec_gods_and_supernatural_beings



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  • Imposing the Ten Commandments

    American Christians are so fond of their Ten Commandments they think they should ignore the constitution and force them on lesser peoples, especially atheists. Christians think to themselves How can anyone have any concept of morality without the Ten Commandments forced on them? Christians almost never read the bible, not even the Ten Commandments.
    They forgot the bible commands the death penalty for people who worship anything but Jehovah, even Mammon/money.
    They forgot that the penalty for failing to honour your mother and father is death.
    They forgot that the penalty for cutting your grass on Sunday is death.
    They forgot that the forbidden graven images includes magazines and TV.
    They forgot the penalty for being raped is death.
    They forgot about the penalty for being an non-virgin bride is death.
    If Christians are going to blatantly ignore the Ten Commandments, where do they get off thinking non-Christians should accept them? Biblical morality is vastly inferior to secular morality. Nobody seriously observes it.



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  • I would have less of an objection if they wanted to display the real, original 10 Commandments which are in Hebrew, not in an inaccurate, christianized English translation. Of course I would still object to it, but it would be be a giggle.



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  • So many Americans condemn the Islamic terrorists (they should) for taking bits and pieces of their holy book and making them the basis for their actions. Yet so many Christians who claim to love our democratic government use bits and pieces of what passes for logic to get around the basic meaning of our constitution. I was oh so glad when that dude drove his truck through the first 10 Commandments monument on the Oklahoma Capital grounds. Then some “holier-than-thou” citizens had another one built and erected. The governor and the state attorney general are both using the court’s rejection of the monument to make political hay. They both have higher political ambitions and are pandering to the unenlightened populous. Not understanding that the constitution is designed to protect the minority (any minority) from the tyranny of the majority, the governor and legislature are trying to change the state constitution to allow for this outright violation of the federal constitution. This is Oklahoma. Beam me up Scotty, there’s no intelligent life down here.



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  • It seems constructive and amusing to list your own “10 Commandments.” Here are mine and I am open to changes or additions (how about 12 “commandments?”)

    Thou shalt not believe in entities or events that have no evidence for existence in the natural universe by means of our senses or extensions of our senses.
    Thou shall question all authorities.
    Thou shalt not believe that different is another word for wrong.
    Thou shalt not kill another human being unless in the case of self defense.
    Thou shall take responsibility for your own actions.
    Thou shall think globally and act locally.
    Thou shalt not believe in any absolute truth.
    Thou shalt not assume you know how another person thinks or feels.
    Thou shall change your ideas if new evidence indicates that your previous ideas are incorrect.
    Thou shalt not attempt to impose your ideas on other people.



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  • Believing that there is no “god” or some other cosmic muffin, I propose that we invent another “god.” How about a new “Dionysus (renewed), the “god” of marijuana??



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  • I also think that we should have the right to erect these “commandments” in stone (or posted) where ever the Biblical ones are erected !….or demand that all “commandments” be eliminated.



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