New rules may end U.S. chimpanzee research

Aug 30, 2015

By David Grimm

No researchers have applied for required federal permits to conduct invasive research on chimpanzees living in the United States. That suggests that all U.S. biomedical research on chimps has stopped—or is about to stop—and it’s unclear whether the work will ever start again. Research on chimpanzees has been waning since 2013, when the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced that it would phase out most government-funded chimp research and retire the majority of its research chimps to sanctuaries.


Read the full article by clicking the name of the source below.

6 comments on “New rules may end U.S. chimpanzee research

  • @OP – Research on chimpanzees has been waning since 2013, when the National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced that it would phase out most government-funded chimp research and retire the majority of its research chimps to sanctuaries.

    In the UK there has been an excellent series of TV programmes about the primate rescue centre, “Monkey World”!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monkey_Business_%28TV_series%29
    There are several chimpanzees, divided in three groups. The Nursery group, consisting of matriarch Sally and several young chimpanzees, including Bryan rescued from Cancun, Mexico.

    There are 3 orangutan groups. Tuan’s group, Gordon’s group and the Nursery group, looked after by foster mum A-mei. They are part of the international breeding program.

    At Monkey World, there are 16 different species of primates include woolly monkeys, capuchins, squirrel monkeys, marmosets, cotton-top tamarins, siamang gibbons, golden-cheeked gibbons and other gibbon species.

    Monkey World is also part of the international species breeding program for golden-cheeked gibbons, orang-utans and woolly monkeys.

    BTW: Why does the OP picture make me wonder if they have room for a special exhibit of the species: Ray Comfortii v stupidicus?



    Report abuse

  • The distinguished Australian-born moral philosopher Peter Singer now teaching at Princeton, has been a prominent voice in the atheist-secular humanist community and a former contributor to Free Inquiry magazine here in the U.S. Ethical imperatives of animal liberation and the elimination of poverty are his major topics of concern:

    (From Wikepedia) Published in 1975, Animal Liberation[15] has been cited as a formative influence on leaders of the modern animal liberation movement.[16] The central argument of the book is an expansion of the utilitarian idea that “the greatest good of the greatest number” is the only measure of good or ethical behaviour. Singer believes that there is no reason not to apply this principle to other animals, arguing that the boundary between human and “animal” is completely arbitrary. There are far more differences, for instance, between a great ape and an oyster, for example, than between a human and a great ape, and yet the former two are lumped together as “animals,” whereas we are considered “human” in a way that supposedly differentiates us from all other “animals.”

    He popularized the term “speciesism,” which had been coined previously by English writer Richard D. Ryder to describe the practice of privileging humans over other animals.[17] In Animal Liberation, Singer argues in favour of vegetarianism and against animal experimentation.



    Report abuse

  • Singer argues in favour of vegetarianism and against animal experimentation.

    I have this internal dilemma. I know that I am an evolved omnivore. I know that my body has evolved to source sustenance from meat and vegetable matter. I know that my teeth and gut are tuned to do this. I also feel the pain of the animal I eat. But the carrot I pull up is a living thing, trying to pass on its genes, just the same as me, or the sheep that supplied tonight’s lamb chops. I source (or try as hard as I can) to source my meat from ethical producers. Free range animals. No feed lot cattle being force fed corn, a substance they can’t digest without the aid of added chemistry. I have no answer to my dilemma. I will eat meat and vegetables, knowing they are both other life forms because I don’t want to starve. If you extend speciesism to its end, it can’t work. Plants are species, and the arguments used by the Vegan movement also apply to the plants. No they are not conscious (do we know for sure) and no they don’t feel pain. (Do they?) But their DNA is in ours and ours in theirs.

    So I will follow the evidence and my evolution and eat what I evolved to eat, and shelve my dilemma.



    Report abuse

  • Let’s compare what you know to what I know. I know that I and everyone else who eats a strictly plant-based, whole foods diet will live a longer, healthier life than anyone who eats a diet heavy in animal protein and saturated fat. I know this is because I’ve been reading decades worth of research papers on nutrition: clinical intervention trials, small scale and giant scale epidemiological studies, laboratory studies and the like. All published in reputable, peer reviewed scientific and medical journals. What I have never seen is any study that shows the contrary, that a diet high (or even “moderate”) in saturated fat and animal protein leads to better health or longevity than does a plant based, whole foods diet. You have arterial plaque right now. Your blood pressure is gradually increasing. Your future as a meat eater will include heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, MS, diabetes, and at least a few years, or probably decades shaved off the end of it, unless you beat the odds: 2 chances in three you will die either of cancer or heart disease, both preventable. I am still looking for a body of research from reputable sources to dis-confirm my belief in the superiority of a plant-based, whole foods diet, because I am convinced that nothing influences health, either good or bad, more strongly than diet, and if I’m wrong, I want to know. I have my own experience to draw from (including the time I spent watching my parents and their peers die in an old folks home), but I rely more on journal published research to inform my choices. I don’t recommend switching to a plant based diet. Instead, I recommend changing the way you come to “know” things.



    Report abuse

  • I don’t recommend switching to a plant based diet. Instead, I recommend changing the way you come to “know” things.

    Thank you John for your informed response. My wife and I are informed and strive for a healthy diet and moderate exercise. CSIRO is Australia’s premier Govt science agency. We are informed on nutrition by their science. As per this link.

    http://www.csiro.au/en/Research/Health/CSIRO-diets/CSIRO-Total-Wellbeing-Diet-Online

    Both of us are within the BMI for our age. (Not the best measure I know but ok for this discussion.) My daily regime. Breakfast. A bowl of high fibre, low GI cereal. Lunch is soup in winter with seeded bread and in summer, salad sandwiches. Dinner is around 200 grams of protein, always lean choice cut, grilled on an outside BBQ with no added fats or oils. Winter. 4 vegetables. Summer. Mixed salad with no dressing. Fruit for incidental snacks. Guilty of a line of chocolate and a glass of red wine. Exercise daily. I even built up a sweat with the vacuum cleaner.

    At 62, I have no health issues. Not one tablet. My GP calls me boring. I would be at the bottom end of meat eating saturated fat consumption. I acknowledge and understand the risks I take with this diet, but I enjoy a lean steak. Do I live longer at the expense of the life lived. Do I strive for a maximum numerical life, without the inherent pleasure of a mixed diet. I choose a modest mix of pleasure and longevity.

    I ponder our evolutionary body. Clearly we are omnivores. I would speculate (without any cit-able evidence) that the diseases you mention did not exist in our hunter gatherer past, and only exist now, because we’ve extended our lifespan far beyond what would have been the mean norm for the last million years. The diseases are a consequence of our life span extending technology.

    Tonight I am cooking chicken tenderloins in garlic and ginger and a sprinkle of Cajun spice and extra virgin olive oil. Steamed cabbage, broccoli, carrots, beans and a tomatoe. (English spelling)



    Report abuse

Leave a Reply

View our comment policy.