One-layer LED paves way for green lighting revolution

Sep 2, 2015

By Tereza Pultarova

An American researcher has developed a new low-cost type of LED light which he claims can lead to more widespread adoption of the technology.

Unlike other types of LED lights, which require engineers to carefully apply four or five layers of material on top of each other in order to achieve the desired performance, this novel new low-cost LED concept only requires one.

“It can potentially revolutionise lighting technology,” said Zhibin Yu, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering at Florida State University. “In general, the cost of LED lighting has been a big concern thus far. Energy savings have not balanced out high costs. This could change that.”


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13 comments on “One-layer LED paves way for green lighting revolution

  • LED lighting has vastly reduced power demands, so greatly reduces carbon foot-prints, simply by reducing the demand for electricity.

    http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2011-10/21/leds-solar-energy-consumption
    “20 percent of the world’s electricity that’s generated is used for lighting. Three quarters of that can be saved by using LEDs; 15 percent of today’s electricity consumption can be saved,” he said at the Economist’s Innovation Summit.



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  • This also looks like you could do displays with this stuff. Every surface in your home potentially becomes a display bright enough to also be considered as lighting.



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  • It’s a sort of interesting observation that if you stand outside at night in a typical urban area, most of the illumination is not produced by Mr. Edison’s (and others’) invention. You’ve got fluorescent, mercury vapor, sodium vapor, LED… not so much incandescent. All in about 135 years.

    Steve



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  • 5
    scargill says:

    Not entirely sure I’m with this – LEDs are still not as cheap or as bright as most compact fluorescents – they are just more flexible. Further, white LEDs are not living up to the “long life” mantra, in some cases dropping efficiency in quite a short time.



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  • scargill
    Sep 6, 2015 at 5:39 am

    Not entirely sure I’m with this – LEDs are still not as cheap or as bright as most compact fluorescents – they are just more flexible. Further, white LEDs are not living up to the “long life” mantra, in some cases dropping efficiency in quite a short time.

    As new technologies efficiencies are still going up, and prices are coming down..

    http://cleantechnica.com/2014/11/05/led-lighting-efficiency-jumps-roughly-50-since-2012/
    Between 2012-2014 LED efficiency jumped from just over 60 lumens per watt to nearly 100 lumens per watt, and they may hit 150 lumens per watt by 2020. Compare LEDs to compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) with 55-70 lumens per watt, and traditional incandescent bulbs with 13-18 lumens per watt, and the LED advantage is bright as day.



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  • 7
    Charles says:

    We also need to figure out a way to produce an LED material that will filter out blue light while preserving turquoise in order to reduce retinal damage yet still maintaining visually undistorted light color.



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  • Scargilp, that’s not true. A 60w equivalent compact fluorescent typically puts out 800 lumens and draws 13 watts. The philips 800 lumen lamp for sale at home depot (2 for $5) draws only 9.5watts, and contains no mercury, but aren’t dimmable. If you want to dim them, the 10.5watt Cree lamps for $6 or $7 each are nice.

    It is true, however, that linear T5 and T8 fluorescent lamps often have better than 100 lumen per watt output (when they are new). This is better than most LED’s on the market right now (until you factor in light fixture efficacy, in which case it’s probably a wash).

    Compact fluorescents have been notoriously unreliable, so it won’t be hard for LED’s to beat their reputation. My experience with the Cree lamps has been great so far. I’ve only owned the cheap philips ones for less than 6 months, so time will tell on those. I do have some older philips LED lamps that cost me $25 each, maybe 4 years ago, and their output appears the same as my new lamps.



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  • David R Allen
    Sep 7, 2015 at 5:02 am

    World_Solar_Challenge

    Cars with their entire surface acting as a PV cell.
    They are so fast, they exceed Australian speed limits.

    Unfortunately, they have to be so small and light that they would be impractical for transporting people or goods safely.

    However, with energy storage, charging while parked, and improved efficiency, larger more practical ones, could contribute to green transport, but would need boost charges for longer or more frequent runs.



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