This Week in Science: September 13th, 2015

Sep 13, 2015


This Week in Science is compiled by Mario Gruber using Wakelet. Click the name of the source below to view on the original website.

10 comments on “This Week in Science: September 13th, 2015

  • @ Mars link:- Now we know why. Later on in the interview, Musk admitted that he advocates detonating thermonuclear explosives on neighboring planet Mars.

    The businessman has often stated that he thinks humans should colonize Mars, and now it seems he’ll stop at nothing to get his way.

    “It is a fixer-upper of a planet,” Musk told Colbert. “But eventually you could transform Mars into an Earth-like planet.”

    This is just half baked wish-thinking, with no prospects of success, the probability of destabilising Mars’ climate and surface for thousands of years, and the probability of damaging the prospects of science bases and scientific research into the history of Mars.

    Mars orbits too far from the Sun, is too small, and too cold, for prospects of success! Even if they succeeded in establishing an Earth pressure atmosphere, the temperatures would be comparable to an Antarctic base and plant growth rates comparable to tundra!

    It is just another silly publicity gimmick from people who would blunder in trying to use brute-force and stupidity on nature!



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  • Advancing Natural Products Innovation and Technology. Natural products include a wide variety of substances produced by plants, bacteria, fungi, and animals that have historically been used in traditional medicine and other complementary and integrative health practices.

    Many medicines and beneficial dietary extracts, have been found from tribal medicine. Even chimps have been known to medicate themselves using local plants, while birds are well known for “anting” to remove parasites.

    Scientific research is needed to separate effective new and old, locally used traditional treatments, from commercialised quackery, and from products with dangerous side-effects.

    (I am pleased to see this comment has now filled a gap on a topic which had no comments – The strange anti-spam system blocked it when I tried to post it two days ago!)



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  • Perhaps this latest news from Cassini should feature this week.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-34268824
    Scientists have determined that the sub-surface body of water on the Saturnian moon Enceladus must be far more extensive than first thought.

    Using pictures from the Cassini probe, the researchers have detected and tracked a slight wobble in the moon.

    After seven years of study, they have concluded this flutter would be much less if the icy crust was connected directly to Enceladus’s rock core.

    It is strong support for the idea of an intervening, global mass of liquid.

    “If the surface and core were rigidly connected, the core would provide so much dead weight that the wobble would be far smaller than we observe it to be,” said Matthew Tiscareno, a Cassini scientist based at the Seti Institute but previously affiliated to Cornell University, US.

    The first clue that something interesting was going on there was the detection of a disturbance in magnetic fields produced by the presence of what appeared to be an atmosphere.

    Scientists quickly established that the moon was venting huge jets of water vapour through south polar surface cracks dubbed tiger stripes because their resemblance to the big cat’s fur coat.

    Models were subsequently produced to explain how liquid water could be maintained on a 500km-wide body in the outer Solar System, and how it might be feeding the jets.



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  • 6
    NearlyNakedApe says:

    Mars orbits too far from the Sun, is too small, and too cold, for prospects of success! Even if they succeeded in establishing an Earth pressure atmosphere, the temperatures would be comparable to an Antarctic base and plant growth rates comparable to tundra!

    And last but not least, Mars doesn’t have a magnetosphere like planet Earth so that means no protection from high energy solar wind particles and radiation. Which is likely to give a really hard time to any form of life, vegetal or animal regardless, not to mention the stripping away of a newly forming atmosphere…



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  • Helloooo.
    It’s not an anti-spam issue. It is a bug in the commenting system.
    If it happens again, please report it to the technical team via the link on the Contact Us page.
    The mods



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  • Moderator
    Sep 16, 2015 at 2:58 pm

    Thanks for the message, but I have been reporting it to the technical team via the link on the “Contact Us page”, on several occasions, for quite some time now, but all that happens is I get an automated reply saying they will get back to me. Meanwhile the problem of post blocking announced by anti-spam software keeps recurring!

    The post above you are commenting on, was reposted by cutting and pasting from the copy included in my email to them, when it came back to me included in the automated reply!

    I hope this bug can be fixed as if it is happening to others, it is going to drive people away – especially if they are not warned about it.



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  • That’s why it’s important that people go on submitting it as an issue to the technical team every time it happens, so that they can see the scale of the problem and get some indication of when it’s happening and therefore what might be triggering it. We do understand the frustration that leads users to comment about it here, but the only people who can fix the problem are the techies, which is why it’s important to keep using the link on the Contact Us page to tell them when it happens.

    Thanks.
    The mods



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  • Pikachu, I choose you!

    augmented app reality

    After reading the Pokémon game description, and watching the video, I’m still not sure how it works / plays.

    Long way since the card game debuted 20 years ago!



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