First Love Child of Human, Neanderthal Found

Oct 16, 2015

Neanderthal Museum (Mettmann, Germany)

By Jennifer Viegas

The skeletal remains of an individual living in northern Italy 40,000-30,000 years ago are believed to be that of a human/Neanderthal hybrid, according to a paper in PLoS ONE.

If further analysis proves the theory correct, the remains belonged to the first known such hybrid, providing direct evidence that humans and Neanderthals interbred. Prior genetic research determined the DNA of people with European and Asian ancestry is 1 to 4 percent Neanderthal.

The present study focuses on the individual’s jaw, which was unearthed at a rock-shelter called Riparo di Mezzena in the Monti Lessini region of Italy. Both Neanderthals and modern humans inhabited Europe at the time.


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14 comments on “First Love Child of Human, Neanderthal Found

  • @OP link – The genetic analysis shows that the individual’s mitochondrial DNA is Neanderthal. Since this DNA is transmitted from a mother to her child, the researchers conclude that it was a “female Neanderthal who mated with male Homo sapiens.”

    The heading OP photo therefore, does not illustrate the situation described in this article!!



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  • 8
    maria melo says:

    Living aside any passionate discussion on the subject wether Neanderrthals go extinct sundenly or there would have been interbreeding, no significative exchange of DNA could happen anyway between two subspecies that have separated 500,00 ago (through speciation process)., right?
    It must have been a lucky 40.000 old fóssil, sense I was Reading that only about 90% of neanderthal fóssil may have preserved DNA.
    Lots of questions I guess.
    Anyway, a 2013 news.



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  • maria melo
    Oct 18, 2015 at 1:41 pm

    Living aside any passionate discussion on the subject wether Neanderrthals go extinct sundenly or there would have been interbreeding, no significative exchange of DNA could happen anyway between two subspecies that have separated 500,00 [50,000?] ago (through speciation process)., right?

    That does not follow! Nature is diverse, and does not conform with human classification systems.

    Where “species” (and particularly subspecies), are separated by geography or life-style, hybrids can remain fertile albeit usually with some reduction in fertility.

    Changing “ice-age” climate is bringing about a similar overlapping of habitat and hybridisation with Polar Bears and Grizzly Bears which move North.

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/hybrid-grizzly-polar-bears-a-worrisome-sign-of-the-norths-changing-climate/article589290/

    Hybrid grizzly-polar bears a worrisome sign of the North’s changing climate

    Formally called a hybrid, local residents call it grolar, pizzly or polar grizz, the offspring of grizzly and polar bear pairings. This one was killed in April, 2010, and as of this past spring, stands preserved and mounted in the community centre in Ulukhaktok, where the veteran hunter who killed it lives.

    The bears, two of which have been killed, are a reality of the new North, where shrinking ice levels and changing climate are driving polar bears back to land and into the expanding habitat of the grizzly.

    The mating is a bad sign for those concerned about the fate of the dwindling populations of each type of bear – female polar bears and grizzlies typically give birth to a cub or cubs once every several years. With hybridization becoming more common and a limited fertility cycle, the likelihood of purebred cubs is reduced.

    Although they’ve long been apart, the bears aren’t all that different – grizzlies are a type of brown bear, the same species from which polar bears evolved as recently as 70,000 years ago.



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  • obviously

    Maybe not to some of the many lurkers who read these threads.

    point?

    My guess, he’s simply augmenting the first sentence for clarification, thank you Roedy.



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  • 13
    maria melo says:

    More mystery about Neanderthal and modern humans: How reliable is ancient DNA analysis?

    This more recent news cools down the over-passionated debate and focus instead about all hipothesis.
    I was becoming too used to the passionated debate from 1998, the year I met in a lecture for anthropology students one of the most passionated persons on the hipotheses of hybrid neanderthal-sapiens child, this was the year of the Lapedo´s child discovery too.
    Yes and No ????



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