Hundreds of New Species Found Within the Eastern Himalayas

Oct 12, 2015

Chintan Sheth/WWF

By Lindsey Kratochwill

The World Wide Fund for Nature (also known as the World Wildlife Fund) released a new report detailing the new species discovered in the Eastern Himalayas from 2009 to 2014. The report counted 211 new species, which comprise 133 plants, 39 invertebrates, 26 fish, 10 amphibians, one reptile, one bird, and one mammal. And from a previous report, the WWF notes that between 1998 and 2008 about 354 new species from the Eastern Himalayas were described. One reason scientists have only recently found these species is due to the region’s topography, which creates isolated areas. These new species (which in reality have likely been living there for a really long time, they’re just new to us) will be welcomed by what the report claims as the region’s more than “10,000 plant species, 300 mammal species, 977 bird species, 176 reptiles, 105 amphibians, and 269 freshwater fish.” We’ve highlighted a few of those species in the gallery below.


View more pictures of the newly discovered species by clicking the name of the source below.

3 comments on “Hundreds of New Species Found Within the Eastern Himalayas

  • Basically, this area comprises terrain which constitutes an island or islands, given that an island can be formed by a ring of mountains, or a range of mountains dividing one island in two, or any geographical feature which isolates a particular area, in which speciation can occur.

    A deep ocean is another form of island, teeming with species yet to be discovered.

    In any case, this is a wonderful example of how little we yet know about this beautiful planet.

    How nice it would be if the energy wasted on trivial, pointless religious disputes, was instead spent creatively examining the real world in which we all live.



    Report abuse

  • Stafford Gordon
    Oct 13, 2015 at 12:33 pm
    .
    Basically, this area comprises terrain which constitutes an island or islands, given that an island can be formed by a ring of mountains, or a range of mountains dividing one island in two, or any geographical feature which isolates a particular area, in which speciation can occur.

    This is very pronounced with altitude and aspect specific ecosystems in heavily dissected mountainous terrain.

    The fjord coast of Chile is another example.



    Report abuse

Leave a Reply

View our comment policy.