Salon’s Richard Dawkins peace summit: “I am against all religion … I think I’d call myself a lover of truth. I’m intolerant of bullsh*t”

Oct 20, 2015

By Michael Schulson

A while back, I was having some beers with the founder of a small atheist publishing house. I’d recently savaged one of his writers in print, and I started laying out a pretty standard critique of the New Atheists — that they caricature religion, they’re elitist, they’re too aggressive and so forth.

The publisher listened for a while, and then told me, politely, that I was being young, harsh and stupid. Until not very long ago, this kind of vocal, proud atheism just didn’t have a solid place in the public eye. These writers had carved out some space for freethinkers to thrive. And that alone was an achievement.

So, say what you will about Richard Dawkins, but give him credit for this: the man’s a pathbreaking iconoclast. In 1976, as a young evolutionary biologist at Oxford, Dawkins wrote “The Selfish Gene,” one of those rare books that’s accessible to lay readers, even as it shapes an academic field. The book established Dawkins’ reputation as one of the more elegant public explainers of Darwin’s theory. Then, in 2006, Dawkins’ “The God Delusion” hit bestseller lists, and made his name synonymous with a certain kind of hardline atheism.

“Brief Candle in the Dark,” released last week, is the second installment of Dawkins’ autobiography (the first, “An Appetite for Wonder,” came out in 2013). A loose collection of reminiscences, the book ranges from Oxford lecture halls to far-flung research stations. The picture that emerges is of an agile thinker who delights more in collaboration than confrontation.

Reached by phone during a visit to New York, Dawkins spoke with Salon about Twitter, pluralism, his love of computer programming and why he thinks Ahmed Mohamed is a fraud.


Read the full interview by clicking the name of the source below.

66 comments on “Salon’s Richard Dawkins peace summit: “I am against all religion … I think I’d call myself a lover of truth. I’m intolerant of bullsh*t”

  • The reason focus is concentrated on Islam is a no- brainer; as is the fact that almost without exception, Muslims are perfectly fine people; the exceptions are the problem.

    However, I think you’re right eejit, and it worries me.

    Although I seldom disagree with anything the man says concerning religion, there’s too much of that unhealthy commodity that should at all costs be avoided, especially here; idolization.

    Leave that to the god botherers.

    Good interview nonetheless.



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  • I meant the glitch by which the same report featuring the bauld Richard appears eleven times on our screens. Still, I do agree that healthy amounts of irony, satire and lampooning are most essential for keeping even secular gurus in check.



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  • 7
    voiceofarabi says:

    My two cents…

    Salon: In the book, you defend your tweet comparing the number of Nobel Prizes won by Muslims with the number won by affiliates of Trinity College, Cambridge. ……… Richard Dawkins:
    I first wrote a tweet calling attention to the remarkable fact that the number of Nobel Prizes won by Muslim societies is, I believe, one — possibly two — compared with hundreds by Jews. And yet the number of Muslims in the world is in the billions. Well, that’s an interesting comparison.

    And you should have kept it as that Mr Dawkins, as changing it to trinity college makes it difficult to solve… Anyway, I have a theory that I believe answers your question…. and here it goes.

    It all started when I got the bug for reading, and I prefer to read in English even thought it is not my first language. I was surprised to notice that all the books I was interested in, “Strategy, philosophy, phycology, etc etc” were written by people who belong to the Jewish faith, which made me ask the question… “WHY??”

    Are the Jews more intelligent?, better race?, smarter gene??? the answer is NO, as we are all the same “human race”, and there is no “super race”….

    The answer came to me when I was having a beer with a friend of mine about the success of the “Lebanese community” that’s living out of Lebanon (and they are every where around the world), and comparatively, they are more successful than other Arabs… The main reason… Wars forced the Lebanese to immigrate and live “amongst” other nations, and learn from them, and at time be better as they will not have the same hindrances as the people from those lands. (off course, it is not just being exiled out of your land, it is also your culture that will make a difference!)

    So, the Jews being exiled from their lands for how many thousands years?? they had to live amongst other nations, but never allowed to assimilate with them because of religion. (very similar to Lebanese), and all of sudden my question answered itself… it is the being exiled from your own land, that drive you to do better than the people around you, as you are not in your comfort zone….

    Today, we see many races who are experiencing the same phenomena with different level of success., (Indians in USA and UK – however they are limited because of their culture).

    If I was a scientist, I would love to do research on this topic…..

    p.s. I don’t think the Jews were exiled out of their land as a mistake or punishment.. I think it was a strategic move to make that faith the smartest and wealthiest ever.



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  • I think you’ve hit on something pertinent voiceofarabi.

    Study and learning are very much part of Jewish culture, and your comment touches on what may well have provided the motivation for it.

    When ever I’ve lived with Jews, what stood out was the constant arguing and discussion that went on; much of it very funny!



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  • I think a diaspora need portable wealth. Gold and gems did figure a small amount but not half as much as skills like tailoring. These are still vulnerable to theft and confiscation (a tailor is no use without his scissors).

    Learning, though, is the ultimate portable and secured wealth we could have.



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  • The first Turkic people to arrive in the UK were the Turkish Cypriots after a long and determined campaign by the Greek contingent to make it happen. I was very young but still remember one food outlet that catered for its people. He grew very rich and still has outlets. Following the Jewish tradition and when others had enough money to do so, the rag trade was taken over by Greek and Turkish Cypriots who could utilise the illegal labour on the cheap that the Jewish community used before them. A few accounting tricks and VAT dodges helped them prosper, all learned from the Jews. Money was then available for schooling and further investment. The Jewish community moved on to the dry cleaning trade. Years went by and as the British government cracked down on illegal workers and especially VAT fraud the ‘sweatshop’ factories started to close down and the Greek and Turkish Cypriot community moved onto the dry cleaning business and fish and chip shops with Kebabs. The dry cleaning business gave them another opportunity, again discovered by the Jewish community first, to handle cash money and declare what they wanted to stay just below the VAT bracket. That little hole is now being closed as well but the first generation Jews have moved on and are of the age to have educated their children and have a comfortable retirement. The Greek and Turkish first generation are at the same place now and all those businesses have been taken over by the Indian community one by one in the same way. Illegal immigrants being a staple diet of these businesses. Before anyone blames these people for cheating the system should ask themselves if the government turned a blind eye to a system that was bringing in major money returns for the country and keeping prices down. The third generation immigrants are the biggest winers here because they have been schooled properly and do not have money issues. The relatively new Turkish ‘invasion’, which includes Kurdish people, had a ready population, that grew quite quickly, to supply food, cloths and all manner of culture related goods with a monopoly . The big supermarkets have ventured into this world but are really not geared up for the fresh and specialised market. Every Cafe, in my part of the world has been taken over by Turkish or Kurds, from Turkey. The food business is their speciality and they have regenerated the cafes and their own brand of Kebab and fish restaurants. There are breakdown services that provide for their own people and a whole community of businesses. The jewish community, being the first are at the front and always one step ahead. They have managed to sell their culture in the UK and the USA better than anybody. Hollywood films have a great Jewish influence no matter where you look and have helped to spread the culture. This brings me to the question of why only a few muslims with Nobel awards many Jews. The Jewish community, without denigrating their achievements, look after their own as do other cultures so can’t really be blamed but if we are looking for facts then lets accept them as they are. Stafford says that it is obvious why focus is on the muslim people but that is a one sided way to look at things if you take into consideration the destruction in the middle east and whose manufactured bombs are assisting in this mayhem. Their focus is on that and the many many thousands the west have killed and helped to kill. When Richard says that the west does not do what the middle east are doing, as in suicide bombs and beheadings then that is not being fair on the clinical bombs and clinical beheading of many many more by western bombs who have now riled the Russians into joining in on the other side openly. Thee has recently been a Turkish scientist awarded the Nobel in the USA and this will escalate because the third generation has matured.



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  • One person who is note worthy for bringing black culture to the world although he was very much resisted even here in the UK by the likes of Radio 1 was Ahmet Ertegun. The resistance was the very reason the soul movement in the UK had to go to specialised shops to buy imported records from the USA.
    The most we had on prime time radio was a little bit of Stevie Wonder and Diana Ross. Another reason why I hate those DJ’s from Jimmy Saville days.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ahmet_Ertegun



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  • Just an observation that people seem to be avoiding these sort of posts where western ways are criticised. Was wondering if people agreed or are a little ‘shellshocked’?



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  • 18
    maria melo says:

    So, the Jews being exiled from their lands for how many thousands years?? they had to live amongst other nations, but never allowed to
    assimilate with them because of religion

    It seems intriguing to me me that Claude Levy-Strauss who has made the point of human cultural diversity as a fact, nevertheless was capable of thinking on human universals (although member of a jewish family), and told an interviewer that religion did not influence his way………. Edgar Morin, child of a safranist jewish family is more known for being a thinker of human nature and humanity too. ……..in a book written by a holocaust survivor it is made clear that the author would not blame german people in particular……. So your point (in bold) seems intriguing to me



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  • 20
    KrustyG says:

    Did anyone notice RD’s very annoyed tone throughout the interview? He wanted to talk about the book and the interviewer just kept going back to tweets and Islam. You know, it must be hard to be labelled strident and anti-Muslim by the very same people who do nothing but talk about tweets and Islam … I don’t know how Richard remains so polite, never mind strident.



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  • 21
    voiceofarabi says:

    Hi Maria Melo,

    One of my favourite books is Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl…. and I am not putting the blame on the Jewish faith for lack of assimilation. I think it is a combination of things….

    First, their success makes other people jealous, and the fact that the Jewish faith explicitly says that they are “different” than the rest, makes it even harder to assimilate.

    add to that, the Christian faith believe you killed their head honcho, and you have the perfect storm.



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  • 22
    voiceofarabi says:

    Hi KrustyG,

    Yes, I have noticed that too, and if it was me, I would be annoyed and would have a go at the reporter, but then again, I guess it goes with the territory, as in those reporters want to report on what makes the average person tick… they want blood and gore, and that’s what they aim for if you let them…

    If I was a reporter, I would ask RD how many people he punched in the name of atheism. 🙂



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  • 25
    maria melo says:

    “and I am not putting the blame on the Jewish faith for lack of assimilation. ”

    You seem to be reinforcing your point here (that reforces the meaning of your previous words)
    By assimilation you mean something as domination?



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  • 32
    voiceofarabi says:

    Hi Maria Melo,

    Pardon me, but English is not my first language.. I just looked it up on google, and this is what I mean by the word assimilation…

    assimilation is the process by which a person or a group’s language and/or culture come to resemble those of another group. The term is used to refer to both individuals and groups, and in the latter case it can refer to either immigrant diasporas or native residents that come to be culturally dominated by another society



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  • @OP “I am against all religion … I think I’d call myself a lover of truth. I’m intolerant of bullsh*t”

    Here’s a new load of bull from the “religion of peace”!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-34612544
    The sign reads: “If you date on the beach, the risk is on your own” – a warning against romantic relationships outside marriage

    Strict laws against homosexuality have come into effect in the conservative Indonesian province of Aceh.

    Gay sex between Muslim men or women, both locals and foreigners, can now be punished with 100 strokes of the cane.

    “The law is to safeguard human dignity. It is to protect Aceh’s Muslims from committing immoral acts,” provincial Sharia chief Syahrizal Abbas told the AFP news agency.

    The law, passed in 2014 but only now being enforced, has faced opposition by rights groups.

    The strictly Muslim province has become increasingly conservative in recent years and is the only one in Indonesia allowed to implement Sharia law.

    Under the new laws, adultery also carries a possible penalty of 100 strokes. Those who accuse someone of adultery without proof could themselves face 80 lashes.

    Gay sex is not illegal in the rest of Indonesia.

    Churches have been destroyed in violent protests in recent weeks or have been demolished by local authorities who said they lacked proper permits.

    As some may remember, while scientific societies have been installing tsunami warning systems, the mullahs have been telling the gullibles that tsunamis are vengeance from Allah, so they better suppress other religions and non-Sharia behaviour, or their “loving god” might send another one to swamp those sinful beach resorts!

    Another oasis of backwardness which civilised intelligent people would do well to avoid!



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  • P.S. – Please ensure when you can, that all travel agencies inform any tourists contemplating bookings to this once delightful area, so they are aware of the dating restrictions for singles, and religious requirements imposed on all!

    http://www.sulawesi-experience.com/indonesia-tourism-destinations/aceh-tourism.html

    Tsunami Museum.
    The museum is officially opened by The President of The Republic of Indonesia, Mr. Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono on February 23rd, 2009. The building is developed with “Rumoh Aceh Escape Hill” concept that has special Aceh architecture, it can be seen by the exterior design with saman design, as well as the interior which describe the greatness of the Majesty Lord, Allah S.W.T.

    The sign reads: “If you date on the beach, the risk is on your own” – a warning against romantic relationships outside marriage.

    Lhok Nga Beach.
    In general Lhok Nga Beach usually crowded, hundreds or even thousands of people come in this beach to enjoy the atmosphere, especially for enjoy the sunset. Lhok Nga beach always crowded by local and foreign tourists (mostly foreign workers coloring Aceh), including the growing number of surf lovers. High waves rolling smoothly but breaking on the sandy beach blackish color mix of white shells, making the seemingly bored surfers paddle boards to the middle of the ocean.
    The distance is too close to the city of Banda Aceh, about 15 minutes from the city center. Lhok Nga beach is a beach that most tar-develop, public toilet facilities and some simple cafes to rest easily found along the coast. Even at this beach is also there with the life guard tower supervisor. The existence of a rescue team was initiated by a local organization which was initially driven by foreign workers who work in Banda Aceh.

    Lampu’uk Beach.
    Lampu’uk beach has the beach with white sands and located in the bay so this place is very appropriate as recreation area, its good for sea bathing or just enjoy beautiful beach view.
    Before Tsunami happened, this area was a traditional village, the people were working as fisherman, farmer, employee of Semen SAI fabric, etc. Because of this area located in shore and in top of Sumatera`s island, so the Tsunamis effect is very fatal. Located at Meunasah Masjid Village, about 15 km from Banda Aceh City.

    Krueng Juli – Ujong Blang Beach.
    Krueng Juli – Ujong Blang beach became the most favorit recreation place and beach tourism object in Aceh, the beach area that holds the enchanting beauty of sea sand beaches, this beach is ideal for swimming, sunbathing and other beach activities. Located on the north coast of Bireun Regency, Ujong Blang Vilage – Krueng Juli, Kuala sub-district.

    Iboih Forest and Beach.
    Iboih is a small and friendly village. Its people will happily serve the tourist in any way. Iboih Recreational Forest is situated adjacent to Rubiah Sea Garden. This forest covers about 1300 hectares area and is also protected as a special nature reserve for Weh Island. This forest is a thick tropical rain forest and although it is dense a difficult to wander trough, visitors are encouraged to explore it. This are is as home to many kinds of animals. See wild monkeys, small and big reptiles and colorful birds. Beside forest there is also Iboih Beach, its one of famous beach in Sabang (Weh Island), Aceh. On this place visitors can be enjoyed white beach, also visitor can swim, snorkling, diving or other sea actifities, beside the beach it self there are available facilities such as: motel/bungalow and cottages, foodstalls, and many more. This place can be reach in about 23 km from down town of Sabang City.

    Sumur Tiga Beach.
    Sumur Tiga Beach is the only beach in Weh Island (Sabang) with about 2 miles long white sandy beach. Located at the east coast of Weh Island, about 5 minutes drive from Sabang town, it has tobe one of the best beach on the island during the western season, especially the second half of the year. The beach is near to town but still quiet and laid back. There are some facility such as Resort, Inn, bungalows, restaurants, and many more. Sumur Tiga Beach located at Ie Meulee Village, about 30 minutes from Sabang City.

    Gapang Beach.
    Gapang Beach is the one most popular beach at Sabang (Weh Island), Gapang beach has a bigger sand beach than Iboih.
    The beach is usually crowd on the weekends with locals tourist. Located about 21 km from Sabang city. There are available facilities such as hotels, bungalows, restaurants, and many more.

    The advertising does not seem to properly reflect the local laws and culture!



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  • 35
    voiceofarabi says:

    Hi Alan4Discussion,

    I think we should be asking the question, why is Indonesia changing now.. What is the driver behind change, what was Indonesia Muslim population like a 100 years ago… this will tell us where the problems is, and if we can identify the root cause, then we can fix the problem… (if we focus on the symptoms, we get nowhere…)



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  • The comment about Nobel prizes to Moslems vs Jews… The effect of political and cultural ideology is phenomenal. A modern example is the effect that the Berlin Wall had on Germans…people who were of the same families behaved completely differently once separated by the wall and struggled to be re assimilated when the wall came down after a relatively short time. The east degenerated completely.
    Another example is the transition in South Africa from the apartheid regime to a democratic society. The transition was unique in that it was peaceful, primarily because no religion was involved before or after. When compared to other oppressive regimes like Sandam Hussains Iraq where he kept the Sunnies and Shias apart by force. Once that was removed the sectarian violence really got going between the supposedly peaceful Moslems.



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  • 37
    voiceofarabi says:

    Hi Richard01,

    I am afraid you have wrong information… when you say

    When compared to other oppressive regimes like Sandam Hussains Iraq where he kept the Sunnies and Shias apart by force.

    During Sadam Husain rule of Iraq… Religion in general was played down as the “Ba’ath party” ruled, which was made up of all religions and sect, clearly demonstrated by Sadam Husain’s cabinet.

    Quite the opposite, during Sadam rule, Shia’a and Sunni inter married, and the lines were very blared.. Real sectarian violence only came after the USA invasion, as the invading power wanted to use that old roman strategy “divide and conquer”, to conquer the land. They paid and put in power the shia’a and marginalized the Sunni to create that divide, in addition, they instructed the Wahhabis in Saudi to inflame the sectarian rhetoric in the entire region.



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  • Voiceofarabi, you may well be correct…my comment was based on what I observed…namely that a ruthless dictator kept the “peace’ which the citizens were subsequently unable to do democratically on their own because of deep seated religious beliefs. Without the interference of religion, the society would possibly have found a way to go forward democratically without violence. I do not agree that it was in the interests of the US to ‘divide and conquer’ as you say….they misguidedly started a chain of events in the naive belief that a dictator could be simply replaced with democracy … which hardly ever happens where intense religion is involved. The US wanted to get out of Iraq asap so I think it would have been in their interests to establish stable democracy as soon as possible, not prevent it?
    In South Africa, a harsh and brutal regime was replaced with a reasonable democracy because, even though there were many religions in the country, religion played no part in the transition and Mandela made a point of refusing to be drawn on religious questions.



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  • 39
    voiceofarabi says:

    Hi Richard01,

    And we are in agreement on many topics, but we deeply disagree on one major topic…

    -I agree, Sadam Husain was a mad dictator, very similar to Hitler… I have more respect for Hitler, as he died on his own sword (poison pill) when he realized he lost… Sadam ran and hid like a rat…

    -I agree, religion is all man made and can be very bad for your health the minute you start breaking the main premise… it is between you and your god, and nothing to do with anyone else… The minute you became the judge of how religious other people are, it falls apart, just like any other philosophy…

    I however disagree with you (and many other people on this site) on the following topic…..

    You see, religion is an illusion, and the minute we expose that illusion, we can see it for all its fault. But it appears, many people on this site, can break through the “religion” illusion, but they maintain other illusions and live happily ever after…

    Many people still believe the USA is a force for good, even after Opium wars, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, etc…

    Fact… USA is the no 1 empire in the world today (I would like to call it, the “Evil Empire”, and like any other empire, they will kill, maim an lie to get there…

    If you believe the USA actions in any of the wars I mentioned was misguided (and not planned by experts at their field), then you are better off going back to religion, as it will keep you warm and frizzy.



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  • voiceofarabi
    Oct 24, 2015 at 11:10 am

    Many people still believe the USA is a force for good, even after Opium wars, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, etc…

    True! – But many people in America have been fed propaganda and wish-thinking from the American media, which is in the pocket of lying advertisers and commercial interest groups, who maintain an absence of accessible honest information.
    It is a culture of disinformation and deception manipulating the population – with religion riding along on this parasitic band-wagon. That is why Americans keep electing politicians who act for vested interest groups, and against the interests of the manipulated voters who have been misled into electing them.

    It should be no surprise, that those who cannot see themselves being ripped off by commercial medical/insurance services in their own country, are so easily misled about what happens whole continents away.



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  • Nail. Head. Hit.

    To characterise a nation, Iran, say, or the USA, of itself as flawed is a gospel of despair, if the worst elements are not pointed out. Both countries are not bad to the bone, but in need change in specific key areas. In Iran the Theocratic clericy needs hobbling from within to weaken its hold over legitmate democratic government. In the US, the Fourth Estate needs to discover the economic benefits of growing a pair, and becoming the absent opposition to the government who confuse being in office and being public servants, with being in power.

    The problems are mostly known. It is inventing the solutions that should absorb our attention. And for those who aren’t aware of the problems, contemplating solutions is often the best way to understand them.



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  • Thank you very much form the Ray Charles video Olgun; I admired him, but my thanks are mainly for the thread which leads to Art Tatum, Oscar Peterson, Nat Cole and Andre Previn.

    It is so refreshing, moving, thrilling and amusing to here them all again; I must play it to my daughter, who stinks the place out with music promos, which drive me from the room!

    Which is surprising, since she was afforded a good musical education.

    Anyway, your post will be winging its way to lots of friends; among whom is a music critic, and the Worlds foremost expert on the Beatles, who, although I’m fond of, I love winding up, and this will do the trick very nicely!



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  • I totally agree that religion is entirely manmade and imaginary. The power of the illusion that institutions like the Catholic church are able to maintain certainly does make it seem possible that other institutions like the US administration and politicians could also establish and maintain the illusion that the US is a force for good when in fact its true agenda is completely different. I doubt the extent of it however and I do not subscribe to the conspiracy theory that the US is primarily evil. Individuals may well be evil they are in any country or organisation and there are undoubtedly personal self enrichment agendas about energy/oil etc among some who will manipulate and abuse others in whatever way they can to achieve their objectives. All countries have their Saddams! Democracy with a free press is the best solution humanity has come up with so far to limit abuse by power hungry individuals and the US has a democratic system that, while flawed, works relatively well and has enabled the US to be what it is.
    It is the no1 empire in the world today and the ideology and value system to which it subscribes has made it so relative to others who have not followed the same model. That is not to say that it is the best for general human happiness but it certainly has achieved a relatively high standard of living for its citizens. I don’t think that it can be honestly argued that the middle east, Africa China etc would not have a higher general standard of living and improved human rights than it presently enjoys if it followed the US model..
    If it was not the US that was the no 1 empire, I am sure whichever country it was would be accused of the same abuse of power as the US and would probably also be accused of having been successful at the expense of others! Humans are naturally competitive and the losers are usually critical of the winners, even if they won “reasonably” fairly!



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  • Richard01
    Oct 24, 2015 at 5:41 pm

    If it was not the US that was the no 1 empire, I am sure whichever country it was would be accused of the same abuse of power as the US and would probably also be accused of having been successful at the expense of others!

    Before the US there were other top empires, but many of them were brought down by stupid inept governments.

    Britain once ruled the waves and world trade, before it tried to bankrupt itself borrowing money to finance silly wars of attrition with rival colonial powers!

    The USA does not seem to have learned much from this example! ($6 trillion borrowed and down the pan on Iraq and Afghanistan!)



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  • 45
    voiceofarabi says:

    Hi Richard01,

    I agree with you on…

    I am sure whichever country it was would be accused of the same abuse of power as the US and would probably also be accused of having been successful at the expense of others!

    You only need t look at the Muslim empire, or the British empire, or the Ottoman Empire to confirm what you say… However, that was in the “dark ages” and before Human Rights charter… we are suppose to be differnet today, but clearly, we are not…

    However, you are wrong when you say….

    I don’t think that it can be honestly argued that the middle east, Africa China etc would not have a higher general standard of living and improved human rights than it presently enjoys if it followed the US model..

    No one is allowed to follow the US model… The US talks about democracy and wanting to give it to the world. In reality, they want to appoint dictators in the rest of the world, as clearly demonstrated by every dictator they appointed in the middle east, Korea, Vietnam, panama, Venezuela, etc etc.

    Finally.. when you say…

    Humans are naturally competitive and the losers are usually critical of the winners, even if they won “reasonably” fairly!

    There is nothing “fair” about killing over a million Iraqi kids to gain control over the middle east, and redraw the maps of the middle east.



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  • Sure Alan4 …in spite of that the constitutional democracy model that it employs has made it the number 1 empire and there are no genuine signs of this changing anytime even though the alarmists would have us believe so!



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  • Looks like he is just passing on the blame to Cheyney and Rumsfeld to me. They won’t be apolgising any time soon and will ride out the storm Blare. Poor Blare got fooled by them so please excuse him.



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  • Tony Blair concedes link between Islamic State and Iraq War

    Ms Sturgeon tweeted: “The Blair spin operation begins but the country still awaits the truth. The delay to Chilcot report is a scandal.”

    But Mr Blair’s office denied the interview was an attempt to set out his version of events before facing probable criticism.

    A spokesman said: “Tony Blair has always apologised for the intelligence being wrong and for mistakes in planning. He has always also said and says again here that he does not however think it was wrong to remove Saddam.

    “He did not say the decision to remove Saddam in 2003 ’caused Isis’ and pointed out that Isis was barely heard of at the end of 2008, when al Qaeda was basically beaten.
    “He went on to say in 2009, Iraq was relatively more stable. What then happened was a combination of two things: there was a sectarian policy pursued by the government of Iraq, which were mistaken policies.

    “But also when the Arab Spring began, Isis moved from Iraq into Syria, built themselves from Syria and then came back into Iraq. All of this he has said before.”



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  • 53
    voiceofarabi says:

    Blair or Bliar is nothing but a pimp who prostituted his country and its people to the Evil Empire…

    Off course, He is a coward as well, and now trying to weasel his way out of the situation, instead of being a great warrior and falling on his own sward.

    p.s. I understand why he did it, I hope we all remember what happened to France, who were against the war for their own “greedy” reasons. (does anyone remember what happened to French wine, and the freedom fries… you go against the Evil Empire, you get shot down.

    This serves to prove that both UK and France are no longer independent countries, they are just salves just like my country



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  • p.s. I understand why he did it, I hope we all remember what happened to France, who were against the war for their own “greedy” reasons. (does anyone remember what happened to French wine, and the freedom fries… you go against the Evil Empire, you get shot down.

    Was it renamed “freedom wine”? Anyway, the French were probably not too concerned about these attacks – how come the evil empire didn’t deploy the death star?



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  • 55
    voiceofarabi says:

    Hi Marktony,

    Oh, on the contrary, they certainly did deploy the death star… it was called Nicolas Sarkozy.

    P.s. it is not the wine or French fries that hurt France, it is all the pressure applied behind the scene that makes countries like UK or France submit. (trade pressure, screwing with countries politics, etc, etc.)

    That’s why when it was time to destroy Libya.. The leaders of Europe were stampeding each other to server the “EVIL EMPIRE” 🙂 … someone should make a satire movie about this



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  • The leaders of Europe were stampeding each other to server the “EVIL EMPIRE”

    I seem to remember quite a few Libyans in Benghazi were also happy to serve the evil empire. And UN resolution 1973 was supported by some non-European countries, not just the US. Even Russia and China were too scared of the evil empire to oppose the resolution.



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  • 57
    voiceofarabi says:

    Hi Marktony,

    not just the US. Even Russia and China were too scared of the evil empire to oppose the resolution.

    Off course, you are 100% correct, and that was the epic point of the USA Evil Empire strength…

    Off course, we are seeing a reversal now…. Blair criticised by his own people for his role in Iraq, Dmitry Medvedev is under investigation for his role in Libya, etc etc..

    The UN is just a mouth piece for whatever the US wants to do, and if they say NO, the USA ignores them and go ahead anyway under the title (coalition of the willing 🙂 ) and the proof is YEMEN… kids are being killed by Saudi’s using American weapons for the last 7 months and no one stops it….

    I am looking forward to multi pole world order… when the USA, Russia, China, Iran, Brazil, India etc all have a genuine saying in the worlds affair, and not just one bully with the largest stick….



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  • History, what history? Look at what is happening to VW because Germany stepped out of line. What happened to all the other companies that were supposed to fall in the car industry?



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  • YEMEN… kids are being killed by Saudi’s using American weapons for the last 7 months and no one stops it….

    Who do you think should intervene?

    I am looking forward to multi pole world order… when the USA, Russia, China, Iran, Brazil, India etc all have a genuine saying in the worlds affair

    Then do you think they all agree on stopping the situation in Yemen? Perhaps they would manage to agree on a stern statement calling for the Saudis to stop being naughty boys.



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  • 60
    voiceofarabi says:

    Hi Marktony,

    you say…

    Who do you think should intervene?

    I think the USA AKA “Evil Empire” can… if they stop providing Satellite Data and Arms to Saudi.. Yemen kids would be saved tomorrow… The Saudi’s can’t organize a prayer in a mosque (we all remember the over 2000 dead during haj season just over a month ago), let alone fight a war…..



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  • 63
    voiceofarabi says:

    Hi Marktony,

    Disagreement is inevitable,

    I agree, but when you have equally powerful partners, and everyone carrying big stick, then you have equilibrium…

    Hold on.. is that what they call a Mexican standoff – ohh bugger.



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  • Disagreement is inevitable, unless you want one world power

    Give everyone nuclear weapons, THE ULTIMATE DETERRENT (apparently) and let people decide who charges what for their own products instead of Merica deciding for them. Market forces instead of bully boy tactics.

    Can’t see that happening very soon.

    Only if we are happy to live the delusion that we are better than everyone else and somehow more democratic. Maybe I am a little bit more fussy about where I sign and how much crap I take. Loyalty does not mean I have to take what I am given if its not fair,



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