Ice Age engravings found at Jersey archaeological site

Nov 9, 2015

by Jonathan Webb

A dig in Jersey has yielded a stash of hunter-gatherer artefacts from the end of the last Ice Age, including stone pieces criss-crossed by carved lines.

They are similar to engravings found from the same period in continental Europe, but are the first of their kind in the British Isles.

Archaeologists are in the early stages of analysing the finds, but estimate them to be at least 14,000 years old.

This places the camp among the earliest in northern Europe after the freeze.

It would also mean that the markings pre-date the earliest known art in the UK, which was found carved into stone walls and bones at Creswell Crags in Derbyshire in 2003.

However, the team wants to study the engravings more closely and hopefully find more of them, before making any grand claims.

Dr Chantal Conneller is co-director of the Ice Age Island project, which for five years has been working on the Les Varines site in the south east area of Jersey. She told the BBC: “We’re feeling reasonably confident at the moment that what we’ve got fits into this broader idea of non-representational Magdalenian art.”

The Magdalenians were one of several hunter-gatherer cultures which gradually re-colonised Europe as the ice retreated, 16,000 to 13,000 years ago.


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7 comments on “Ice Age engravings found at Jersey archaeological site

  • It seems to illustrate the re-population from Europe as the climate warmed.

    The Channel Islands would have been tundra to the south of the melting face of the ice-cap, and with lower sea-levels would have been accessible from continental Europe.



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  • The Channel Islands are not part of the United Kingdom, nor are they geographically part of Britain or Ireland. There is no such place as the British Isles, have a look at a political map if you don’t believe me. The islands in question are home to three political entities, The United Kingdom, The Republic of Ireland, and the Isle of Mann.

    The Channel Islands and Mann are are listed as British Territories, whatever that may mean; in any event it’s a very handy scam for the British Government in relation to dodgy offshore banking, which they ignore, especially when they are banging on about Ireland’s low corporate tax rate. The Channel islands are very close to the French coast, and a long way from the south coast of England.



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  • eejit
    Nov 10, 2015 at 7:53 am

    The Channel Islands are not part of the United Kingdom, nor are they geographically part of Britain or Ireland. There is no such place as the British Isles, have a look at a political map if you don’t believe me. The islands in question are home to three political entities, The United Kingdom, The Republic of Ireland, and the Isle of Mann.

    According to the government of Jersey:-

    https://www.gov.je/Leisure/Jersey/Pages/Profile.aspx

    Jersey is self-governing and has it own financial and legal systems and its own courts of law. The States Assembly is made up of 49 elected members.

    .Jersey is a British Crown Dependency, and is defended and internationally represented by the UK government. Today, the Lieutenant-Governor of Jersey is the personal representative of Her Majesty the Queen here in the Island.

    Jersey’s government also issues its own internationally-recognised driving licences and is responsible for its own vehicle registration. Jersey has its own unique number plate sequence – number plates all start with the letter J.

    .Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man are part of the British Isles. England, Scotland and Wales make up Great Britain, while the United Kingdom includes Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Jersey is a British Crown Dependency.



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  • Like I said,Mann and the Channel Islands are not part of the UK. “The British Isles” is an imperialist term, which is not accepted in this country, nor should it be. It has never had constitutional status, so it has always been a geographicalexpression, albeit a highly provocative and inaccurate one.

    There are Crown Dependencies all over the world, that does not make them part of the British Isles. I don’t see how islands which are off the coast of France could be part of the British Isles; there is no such legal entity, and geographically, they are obviously part of France.



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