Another Year, Another Anti-Evolution Bill in Oklahoma

Jan 25, 2016

Photo credit: RossellaApostoli/Thinkstock

By Laura Moser

Oklahoma! Where there’s “plenty of air and plenty of room”—and plenty of determination, even in 2016, to get evolution out of the classroom. Just witness the tireless efforts of state Sen. Josh Brecheen, who every year since being elected in 2010 has authored legislation aimed at skirting nearly three decades of court decisions that prohibit teaching creationism in public schools.*

His first year in office, according to the National Center for Science Education, Brecheen—a Republican member whose official Oklahoma Senate bio page lists his occupation as “motivational speaker”—wrote in the Durant Daily Democrat that “I have introduced legislation requiring every publicly funded Oklahoma school to teach the debate of creation vs. evolution using the known science, even that which conflicts with Darwin’s religion.” (One of Brecheen’s more recent missions, incidentally, is “nullifying” the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage.)

But as Brecheen’s anti-evolution bills have repeatedly fizzled before becoming law, he has taken to adopting (slightly) more subtle tactics. In the 2016 version, instead of advancing an outright endorsement of creationism, the more euphemistic purpose of Brecheen’s Senate Bill 1322 is:

to create an environment within public school districts that encourages students to explore scientific questions, learn about scientific evidence, develop critical thinking skills and respond appropriately and respectfully to differences of opinion about controversial issues. … Teachers shall be permitted to help students understand, analyze, critique and review in an objective manner the scientific strengths and scientific weaknesses of existing scientific theories covered in the course being taught.

As with the intelligent-design debate, there is no supremacy of fact; there are only “opinions about controversial issues.” And even if poor, God-fearing teachers are forced to discuss those pesky “existing scientific theories” of how the world was created, they are also allowed to discuss the potential “weaknesses” of said theories (like, say, their making no appearance in Genesis) without repercussions.


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8 comments on “Another Year, Another Anti-Evolution Bill in Oklahoma

  • Just read this. I felt such hate I had to do something. So I sent the RDFRS fifty bucks. That helped a little.
    My God, what is the matter with these people? Although I am not a theist I am not entirely convinced that evil does not exist in the world. Creationist like Wendy Wright and those like her, and this prick referenced above, strike me as just plain…evil. They’re evil! (Epiphany.)



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  • I know Dan. How many times do we need to go through this.
    There should be legislation to stop this. Its already been heard several times.
    I’m getting some funds to RD and Sanders this week.
    And I can barely afford it.



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  • Oklahoma! Where there’s “plenty of air and plenty of room”—and plenty of determination, even in 2016, to get evolution out of the classroom. Just witness the tireless efforts of state Sen. Josh Brecheen,

    It is fairly obvious, that there is large amount of “air” between Brecheen’s ears where intellectuals keep an educated brain!

    @OP – His first year in office, according to the National Center for Science Education, Brecheen—a Republican member whose official Oklahoma Senate bio page lists his occupation as “motivational speaker”

    Is that “newspeak” for “ranting preacher”?

    —wrote in the Durant Daily Democrat that “I have introduced legislation requiring every publicly funded Oklahoma school to teach the debate of creation vs. evolution using the known science,

    Demonstrating his personal level of understanding of “known science” is ZERO!

    even that which conflicts with Darwin’s religion.”

    It also demonstrates that he is so besotted with his own flawed fundamentalist religious faith-thinking processes, that he has no concept of science or evidence based reasoning methodology.

    He looks like a classic example of the self publicising political monkey, who has no idea how to plan for looking after the interests of his citizen voters, but is keen to appear to be doing something to justify his election!



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  • “…Darwin’s religion”, sums it all up; opponents of descent with modification don’t even know how to distinguish scentific evidence from wishy-washy wishful thinking.

    It’s depriving children of a vital element of their education, by selfish, vain, incorrigible, adult ignoramuses which is most galling.

    I would have thought that during the process of concocting a semantic fog behind which to conceal their motives, the creationists might have caught a glimmer of something enlightening.



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  • A six-pack for Brecheen and Kern – there’ll be no let up until your (et.al.) tom-foolery ceases.

    The “strength and weaknesses” argument was / is anemic, no matter how they try slice it into anti-e bills.

    “sit around and talk, and watch the hawk, making lazy circles in the sky” – rich Christian Oklahoma BLM ranchers who home-school their children (evolution on the docket? I’d be surprised) is another facet albeit off-topic.



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  • Nihil non ratione tractari intellique voluit. –
    Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus

    Which translates into English as ” There is nothing God does not wish to be understood and investigated by reason”

    Blockquote



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  • What a stupid person Brecheen chooses to be! “…creation vs. evolution using the known science”? RUFK Me? This known science IS evolution so therefore, there exists absolutely no debate “using the known science”.



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