That Time Chris Hadfield Sang David Bowie’s Space Oddity on the ISS

Jan 11, 2016

A revised version of David Bowie’s Space Oddity, recorded by Commander Chris Hadfield on board the International Space Station in 2013.

20 comments on “That Time Chris Hadfield Sang David Bowie’s Space Oddity on the ISS

  • David Bowie was a pioneer as you are and I sure hope the planet Earth sustains and grows to allow great people like you to chart the course of humanity on this extremely special place we named earth.



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  • Terrible drug problem, though.
    Great, great musician.
    Diamond Dogs one of the great rock albums of all times.
    Hunky Dory, Aladin Sane. Great albums too.
    Life On Mars. Great song, a masterpiece.
    Chris Hadfield a bit annoying. He did that cause he could.



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  • annoying

    Probably not to the children / young adults he plays for, and inspires, at the SickKids Canadian Hospital. I, for one, welcome Hadfield paying it forward.



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  • 11
    Pinball1970 says:

    Must be the most expensive music video ever? I mean, if you include travel expenses, accommodation

    Yes makes thriller look like amateur night.

    Sad Sad sad! David Bowie was a great song writer, singer and musician- Is that obvious? Not really. I dont think I heard that once put like that during all the tributes.
    Everyone has been talking about him like he was mainly some sort of fashion & cultural icon.
    He could have played his music wearing a tweed jacket and short back and sides, it was the music that was special.
    The chords from life on mars would still send a tingle down my spine.
    It annoying that he had to dress some up like a clown in the music business to get the image noticed and the when he are died all they remember is the f***ing clown suit.
    When I explain to my son why he was so good I will pick up a guitar to do it.



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  • Not for me I’m afraid. “I sang Bowie in space”, badly, is not something I hope to remember him for. His other achievements will do and his description of when he first stepped out of the spacecraft into the universe always takes my breath away.

    My brother gave me my first record player in the early seventies. It was red with cream piping, looked like a small suitcase and only had one speaker. My best mate, at the time, used to go to a record shop that sold second hand ones along with second hand books. We started collecting Enid Blyton books and when I got my personal record player I found an album by Bowie that, still to this day, I have only met two people who know it. It is from Bowies BBC days and there are a few versions of it with mainly the same songs. My version is called ‘The World of David bowie’, and I love it. It was a time when you can here how good Bowies voice really is. I loved his other early stuff but can pick and chose his music from about the eighties on. The link below is my favourite from the Album and I got very good at singing it a while back. A friend offered to help record it, for my personal use, but I lost my bottle and never did it. Shyness is crippling sometimes.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmGKnD7UZZ8



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  • He has a nice TED talk too, about managing fear using reason and rehearsal.

    I now walk into spiders webs too.

    Paying it forward is exactly right. His account of being thrilled as a child by the earlier generations of brave men and women in their flying machines….



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  • Named my son Ziggy because of Bowie’s song, and my love of the poetry of Sagan’s concept of us all being made of stardust (that thought was going through my mind during my wifes pregnancy and his birth). Very sad to hear the news.

    Whether this song was about drug use of space exploration doesn’t bother me one bit, many artists at the time were explorers and that often led to risky activities, such as drug taking. I think many may have been naive about drugs at the time, I also think many were possibly self medicating, I’ve know enough artistic people to believe they likely have a higher level of certain mental issues than the rest of the population, (anxiety, depression etc.) or to be precise I suspect that the structure of the brain that allows enormous left of field thinking can often put people at risk of having metal health issues and equally at risk of becoming artists (equally risky from my personal experience – at least financially). Happy to be proven wrong though – small sample size and all that. Anyway Space Oddity, is to my way of thinking is all about risking all reaching into the beyond. We can’t get enough of that.

    So thank you David Bowie for the thoughts and the tunes.



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  • the when he are died all they remember is the f***ing clown suit.

    I kinda agree with your sentiment at least as far as the suit itself goes – I wouldn’t be seen dead in it. However I think the point of all the theatrics was to shake up what was at the time a very stuffy and uptight social values. I’m all for occasionally shocking the status quo. Here’s the alternative click here personally I’d prefer the stupid clown outfit and the theatrics.



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  • Yes, often the lawyers get in the way. There is no way that Hadfeild’s tribute helped Bowie’s record sales.

    Similar thing happened when Gary Larson (the far side cartoonist) created a cartoon with an apes wife finding a human hair while grooming and accusing the husband ape of having an affair with that Jane Goodall tramp. Of course immediately some overzealous (and humorless) member of her organization tried to start legal action, Larson being a fan of Jane Goodall was first horrified to think he had caused offense to a hero. Of course it turned out Goodall had loved the cartoon when she saw it had cut it out and put it on her fridge. They eventually agreed to make T’shirts for Goodall’s organization.



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  • For me it highlights the difference between science fiction and science fact. Kubrick and Clarke could imagine iPads and videocalls, but couldn’t imagine the guys heading for Jupiter bringing a guitar along, and streaming home “Space Oddity”. Truth is indeed stranger, and more interesting, than fiction.

    As for those griping about the vocals, well, it’s a whole lot better than “I was walking on the moon one day, in the merry merry month of [may/december]”… cant even agree on the lyrics , which I think is the only other song-from-space we’ve ever heard.



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  • Whether this song was about drug use o[r] space exploration doesn’t bother me one bit, many artists at the time were explorers and that often led to risky activities, such as drug taking.

    Problem is, the song uses space travel/exploration as a metaphor for behavior and experience that is only remotely comparable. Also, the song has an “unhappy” ending that might not be good to hear in the context in which Mr. Hadfield performed the song. (But, I guess if listeners don’t detect or learn of the metaphor, or get the ending, then no harm done.)

    …Anyway Space Oddity, is to my way of thinking is all about risking all reaching into the beyond.

    Risking all, indeed.

    Beyond, indeed.



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