This church’s cancer-curing elixir is really bleach, federal authorities say

Mar 16, 2016

Photo credit: Doug Nash

By

It wasn’t hard to see why the Justice Department prosecuted Louis Daniel Smith for selling misbranded drugs. By their account, the 46-year-old was selling a substance that he claimed could cure everything from cancer to AIDS to asthma but was, in reality, a type of bleach.

Smith was convicted last year and is now serving a sentence of four years and three months in federal prison. But his miracle cure, dismissed as fake by the Food and Drug Administration, continues to be promoted by its devoted, anti-pharmaceutical-industry advocates. They say they’re unafraid of the authorities because they’re not selling the substance but simply spreading their religious values.

“As long as I’m just telling you about it, it’s just education,” said 78-year-old Floyd Jerred, a bishop in the Genesis II Church of Health & Healing, which has made the elixir the centerpiece of its religion. “And if they do lock me up, I know how to do out-of-body travel. I can go anywhere, see anything I want to see anyway.”

The case of MMS, also known as Miracle Mineral Solution or Miracle Mineral Supplement, illustrates a persistent problem for federal regulators and prosecutors. People seeking a quick way to get cured — or to get healthier, skinnier or stronger — are willing to try untested products, and some in the supplement industry prey on their hopes.

Federal prosecutors have recently been cracking down. A Justice Department spokesman said year-by-year data was not available, but in November the department announced it had brought civil or criminal cases against more than 100 makers and marketers of dietary supplements as part of a sweep.

Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch noted the aggressive enforcement in a video message released Tuesday. In one indictment, prosecutors alleged that the distributors of two popular workout and weight-loss supplements — Jack3d and OxyElite Pro — lied about the ingredients in their products and knew of studies linking them to liver toxicity.

But MMS and testimonials about its effectiveness continue to proliferate online, largely because of the Genesis II Church of Health & Healing. Church leaders put on costly seminars for people to learn more about the product, and one later this month in Houston asks people for “$500 cash at the door,” according to an online listing.

Benjamin C. Mizer, the principal deputy assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s civil division, said supplements are not subject to standards as rigorous as those for FDA-approved drugs. MMS, he said, represents a “particularly egregious” case.

“The people who are promoting and distributing MMS are telling people to ingest bleach, and that is not good for anyone,” Mizer said.


Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/federal-authorities-this-churchs-cancer-curing-elixir-is-really-bleach/2016/03/09/17f9e7d2-e238-11e5-9c36-e1902f6b6571_story.html

8 comments on “This church’s cancer-curing elixir is really bleach, federal authorities say

  • And if they do lock me up, I know how to do out-of-body travel. I can go anywhere, see anything I want to see anyway.”

    How does one begin to deal with such insanity?

    Church leaders put on costly seminars for people to learn more about the product, and one later this month in Houston asks people for “$500 cash at the door,” according to an online listing.

    Religion, always finds its way to the almighty dollar!
    Report abuse

  • @OP – Smith was convicted last year and is now serving a sentence of four years and three months in federal prison. But his miracle cure, dismissed as fake by the Food and Drug Administration, continues to be promoted by its devoted, anti-pharmaceutical-industry advocates. They say they’re unafraid of the authorities because they’re not selling the substance but simply spreading their religious values.

    Theistic brain-rot, is generally impervious to evidence or reasoning!
    Report abuse

  • This could just as easily be reported as a story about the abuses of medical science. But we all know this is not a story about religion or science. It is the story of one man and his crimes against innocent and desperate people. It is simply convenient for those who wish to look at what is called a church and then talk as though this is typical of what churches do. It is cheap and unworthy of a community that claims to be guided by reason. Christians, believers of all kinds, are caricatured as automatons in this world. I congratulate those commenting here so far for demonstrating blind faith by obeying Richard Dawkins’ ‘command’ to mock religion. Now we know what blind faith looks like and you have done humanity a great service.
    Report abuse

  • Mike Tea #4
    Mar 18, 2016 at 4:26 pm

    This could just as easily be reported as a story about the abuses of medical science.

    It is in fact the abuse of using medical religious pseudo-science.

    But we all know this is not a story about religion or science.

    Actually it IS about a religious cult which describes him as a bishop in the Genesis II Church of Health & Healing, which has made the elixir the center piece of its religion.
    I realise that faith-blinkers inhibit reading skills!

    It is the story of one man and his crimes against innocent and desperate people.

    @OP – But MMS and testimonials about its effectiveness continue to proliferate online, largely because of the Genesis II Church of Health & Healing. Church leaders put on costly seminars

    I always thought the word “leaders” was plural!

    It is simply convenient for those who wish to look at what is called a church and then talk as though this is typical of what churches do. It is cheap and unworthy of a community that claims to be guided by reason. Christians, believers of all kinds, are caricatured as automatons in this world.

    I see you use the Fallacy Of Extension attacking an exaggerated or caricatured version of your opponent’s position, in place of a reasoned comment – along with the “No true Scotsman fallacy”!

    I congratulate those commenting here so far for demonstrating blind faith by obeying Richard Dawkins’ ‘command’ to mock religion.

    We only mock religions which are deserving of mockery, but we also mock fallacious thinkers who produce knee-jerk preaching and posturing on lecturing others on “being guided by reason”!

    Now we know what blind faith looks like and you have done humanity a great service.

    That’s alright! Readers here also know what psychological projection looks like, particularly when it is motivated by tribalistic blind faith and “No True Scotsman” denial!
    Report abuse

  • I’m about to the point where, in a society that has 97% literacy and access to education, I say let people be stupid and let some people make money from them. It’s NOT the same as saying we must act to protect the public because 70% of our population is illiterate and thus unable to get good information themselves. No, they are choosing what they want or prefer to believe. You can protect the ignorant from others but not the stupid from themselves.
    Report abuse

Leave a Reply

View our comment policy.