Reaching for the Stars, Across 4.37 Light-Years

Apr 14, 2016

Photo credit: European Southern Observatory

By Dennis Overbye

Can you fly an iPhone to the stars?

In an attempt to leapfrog the planets and vault into the interstellar age, a bevy of scientists and other luminaries from Silicon Valley and beyond, led by Yuri Milner, a Russian philanthropist and Internet entrepreneur, announced a plan on Tuesday to send a fleet of robot spacecraft no bigger than iPhones to Alpha Centauri, the nearest star system, 4.37 light-years away.

If it all worked out — a cosmically big “if” that would occur decades and perhaps $10 billion from now — a rocket would deliver a “mother ship” carrying a thousand or so small probes to space. Once in orbit, the probes would unfold thin sails and then, propelled by powerful laser beams from Earth, set off one by one like a flock of migrating butterflies across the universe.

Within two minutes, the probes would be more than 600,000 miles from home — as far as the lasers could maintain a tight beam — and moving at a fifth of the speed of light. But it would still take 20 years for them to get to Alpha Centauri. Those that survived would zip past the star system, making measurements and beaming pictures back to Earth.

Much of this plan is probably half a lifetime away. Mr. Milner and his colleagues estimate that it could take 20 years to get the mission off the ground and into the heavens, 20 years to get to Alpha Centauri and another four years for the word from outer space to come home. And there is still the matter of attracting billions of dollars to pay for it.

“I think you and I will be happy to see the launch,” Mr. Milner, 54, said in an interview, adding that progress in medicine and longevity would determine whether he would live to see the results.

“We came to the conclusion it can be done: interstellar travel,” Mr. Milner said. He announced the project, called Breakthrough Starshot, in a news conference in New York on Tuesday, 55 years after Yuri Gagarin — for whom Mr. Milner is named — became the first human in space.

The English cosmologist and author Stephen Hawking is one of three members of the board of directors for the mission, along with Mr. Milner and Mark Zuckerberg, the Facebook founder.


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4 comments on “Reaching for the Stars, Across 4.37 Light-Years

  • @OP- to send a fleet of robot spacecraft no bigger than iPhones to Alpha Centauri, the nearest star system, 4.37 light-years away.

    If it all worked out — a cosmically big “if” that would occur decades and perhaps $10 billion from now — a rocket would deliver a “mother ship” carrying a thousand or so small probes to space. Once in orbit, the probes would unfold thin sails and then, propelled by powerful laser beams from Earth,

    While solar sails and laser beams are feasible for some travel across the Solar System, I think there are a few points which are wish-thinking here!

    Having sufficient fuelled powerful lasers very accurately tracking a thousand tiny space probes is a big ask. There would probably have to be more lasers far out in the Solar System to act in relays as boosters.

    set off one by one like a flock of migrating butterflies across the universe.

    I don’t rate the author of this line as having much idea about astronomy!

    set off one by one like a flock of migrating butterflies across the a small star cluster in a tiny patch of our galaxy!

    Within two minutes, the probes would be more than 600,000 miles from home — as far as the lasers could maintain a tight beam — and moving at a fifth of the speed of light.

    That speed is an ambitious target! Earlier projects designing large fusion powered probes have suggested 12% of light speed.

    To deliver that much energy in tight laser beam(s) in two minutes, is going to produce massive g forces on the structure, and generate vast amounts of heat!

    But it would still take 20 years for them to get to Alpha Centauri. Those that survived would zip past the star system, making measurements and beaming pictures back to Earth.

    I really can’t see such small probes maintaining an accurate tight beam, or having the transmitting power to send a signal over that distance. Even with relay stations along the way it does not sound plausible.
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