Decapitated Churches in China’s Christian Heartland

May 25, 2016

By Ian Johnson

Along the valleys and mountains hugging the East China Sea, a Chinese government campaign to remove crosses from church spires has left the countryside looking as if a typhoon had raged down the coast, decapitating buildings at random.

In the town of Shuitou, workers used blowtorches to cut a 10-foot-high cross off the 120-foot steeple of the Salvation Church. It now lies in the churchyard, wrapped in a red shroud.

About 10 miles to the east, in Mabu township, riot police officers blocked parishioners from entering the grounds of the Dachang Church while workers erected scaffolding and sawed off the cross. In the nearby villages of Ximei, Aojiang, Shanmen and Tengqiao, crosses now lie toppled on rooftops or in yards, or buried like corpses.

On a four-day journey through this lush swath of China’s Zhejiang Province, I spoke with residents who described in new detail the breathtaking scale of an effort to remove Christianity’s most potent symbol from public view. Over the past two years, officials and residents said, the authorities have torn down crosses from 1,200 to 1,700 churches, sometimes after violent clashes with worshipers trying to stop them.

“It’s been very difficult to deal with,” said one church elder in Shuitou, who like others asked for anonymity in fear of retaliation by the authorities. “We can only get on our knees and pray.”

The campaign has been limited to Zhejiang Province, home to one of China’s largest and most vibrant Christian populations. But people familiar with the government’s deliberations say the removal of crosses here has set the stage for a new, nationwide effort to more strictly regulate spiritual life in China, reflecting the tighter control of society favored by President Xi Jinping.

In a major speech on religious policy last month, Mr. Xi urged the ruling Communist Party to “resolutely guard against overseas infiltrations via religious means,” and he warned that religions in China must “Sinicize,” or become Chinese. The instructions reflect the government’s longstanding fear that Christianity could undermine the party’s authority. Many human rights lawyers in China are Christians, and many dissidents have said they are influenced by the idea that rights are God-given.

In recent decades, the party had tolerated a religious renaissance in China, allowing most Chinese to worship as they chose and even encouraging the construction of churches, mosques and temples, despite regular crackdowns on unregistered congregations and banned spiritual groups such as Falun Gong.

Hundreds of millions of people have embraced the nation’s major faiths: Buddhism, Taoism, Islam and Christianity. There are now about 60 million Christians in China. Many attend churches registered with the government, but at least half worship in unregistered churches, often with local authorities looking the other way.

But Mr. Xi’s decision to convene a “religious affairs work conference” last month — the first such leadership meeting in 15 years — suggested that he was unhappy with some of these policies. People familiar with the party’s discussions say it intends to apply some lessons from the campaign in Zhejiang to rein in religious groups across the country.

While the government is unlikely to begin tearing down crosses across China, the sources say, local authorities are expected to begin scrutinizing the finances and foreign ties of churches and other spiritual institutions as part of an effort to limit the influence of religions the party considers a threat, especially Christianity.

“What has been happening in Zhejiang is a test,” said Fan Yafeng, an independent legal scholar in Beijing. “If the government views it as a success, it will be expanded.”


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5 comments on “Decapitated Churches in China’s Christian Heartland

  • @OP – While the government is unlikely to begin tearing down crosses across China,

    It would seem reasonable that advertising symbols should be restricted by planning laws.

    the sources say, local authorities are expected to begin scrutinizing the finances and foreign ties of churches and other spiritual institutions as part of an effort to limit the influence of religions the party considers a threat, especially Christianity.

    In view of the damage Catholicism, evangelism and extreme Islam is doing in Africa, regulation of imported woo would seem to be reasonable!



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  • @ #1 – “In view of the damage…”

    I’ve the impression it’s Xi’s wanting to retain cultural/national/communist identity(?).

    buried like corpses

    Underground requiem for the “deceased”, sancta.

    wrapped in red shroud

    Christo and Jeanne-Claude-esque, i.e. morphed into art, new symbolism.



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  • 3
    kierpedrero says:

    I find it interesting to observe what euphemisms the authors of such articles use in place of the word “religion”. In this article, I see “faiths” and “spiritual institutions”. What does this usage tell us about the slant of the authors?



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  • kierpedrero #3
    May 28, 2016 at 10:21 am

    I find it interesting to observe what euphemisms the authors of such articles use in place of the word “religion”. In this article, I see “faiths” and “spiritual institutions”.

    I think the terms do have different meanings.

    Christianity or Islam, for example are “religions”, whereas particular denominations, sects or cults (Catholicism, Methodism, Shia, Sunni etc.) are more appropriately called “faiths”!

    “Spiritual institutions” more accurately describes formally recognised bodies for legal and business purposes, as distinct from personal views about the supernatural.



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  • The, “Only” issue I see here is the removal of a, “Device Of Torture”.. aka, a “Instrument” of torture for the explicit reason to cause,, Anguish, Pain and Suffering.
    Better known as, your, “Final Resting Stop” before you die..
    It would be the same as if you used the symbol of a, “Guillotine” to resemble something that is secured or held in great esteem,, when in fact it represents the complete opposite.
    Removing, “All” religious symbols is not something to be overly concerned with as long as these symbols are displayed inside the buildings of their choice,, where they belong.
    Remember we are talking about a, “Business” that extorts money by selling someone’s imaginary friend and nothing more.



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