Jamie Raskin, An Openly Humanist U.S. House Candidate from Maryland, Just Won His Primary

May 3, 2016

By Hemant Mehta

While the focus of U.S. politics tonight is on Donald Trump‘s sweep over his Republican rivals, and Hillary Clinton‘s continued dominance over Bernie Sanders, there’s one race that may have slipped under the radar of atheists.

In Maryland, State Senator Jamie Raskin just won his primary for the U.S. House.

Why is that relevant?

Raskin, below, could become the next (and only) openly non-theistic member of Congress. And tonight, he overcame his biggest hurdle. In 2014, Democrat Rep. Chris Van Hollen won the same seat with 60% of the votes.

Raskin came to my attention years ago for a memorable retort he made (before he was in elected office) at a hearing concerning same-sex marriage:

“People place their hand on the Bible and swear to uphold the Constitution; they don’t put their hand on the Constitution and swear to uphold the Bible,” he said.

He’s not the first person to have said a variation of that line, but he was clearly someone who supported church/state separation.


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4 comments on “Jamie Raskin, An Openly Humanist U.S. House Candidate from Maryland, Just Won His Primary

  • We in the US could have a potential candidate who is open secular attempt to run for president. The media would quickly turn to the religious issue, and what would follow would be a debate on the existence of a god. I think this would do more to convert many who now question that existence. Such debates to follow would hasten the conversions of many people to becoming atheists. That potential candidate probably would never get nominated, but it would e the VERY heated arguments that would be valuable!



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  • There always has to be someone first. Then magically it becomes way way easier for everyone who comes after.

    It is as though the bigots exhaust themselves protesting the first.



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