South Carolina’s New Abortion Law

May 25, 2016

By Matt Vasilogambros

South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley signed a bill on Wednesday that bans abortions 20 weeks after conception. The law does not have exceptions for rape or incest.

The new law will allow doctors to perform abortions after 20 weeks if the mother’s life is threatened or if the fetus has “an anomaly” and will die. The bill was passed by the state’s General Assembly last week. Current state law requires women to receive state-directed counseling aimed at discouraging abortions. Women seeking abortions must then wait an additional 24 hours to have the procedure.


Continue reading by clicking the name of the source below.

5 comments on “South Carolina’s New Abortion Law

  • As I have no uterus, my opinions on this matter should be inherently secondary to those who do, in fact, possess said apparatus. I’ll still opine, however, realize that even I know that I should not matter much in this debate.

    If a law rests solely on keeping people from going to hell, it is a bullshit law heralded by bullshit artists and ultimately abided by deluded people buying into the bullshit.

    Law does not stop any woman from hiding their pregnancy and terminating it in a myriad of ways, both legal and surgical and illegal and “back alley”. Law does not stop anyone anywhere from doing anything that they want to do (if they want to badly enough). So, this “new law” simply will manifest in women seeking the procedure earlier — and ultimately getting/doing what they want. you cannot control people based on belief if said people do not share your belief. It is a clear sign of low brow control freaks.

    Law should show no bias. This law clearly is biased toward people who are endlessly trying to please an imaginary god to gain access to an imaginary heaven and stay in an imaginary eternity. These people think that it is not enough to be “good” themselves, but rather to inflict their hallucinations on folks who are not hallucinating… They do this because they “love” you. Absolutely logic-less.



    Report abuse

  • @OP – The new law will allow doctors to perform abortions after 20 weeks if the mother’s life is threatened or if the fetus has “an anomaly” and will die. The bill was passed by the state’s General Assembly last week.

    Let’s compare this with the current guidance in England:

    http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Abortion/Pages/Introduction.aspx

    Why an abortion may be needed

    There are many reasons why a woman might decide to have an abortion, including:

    personal circumstances – including risk to the wellbeing of existing children

    a health risk to the mother

    a high chance the baby will have a serious abnormality –
    either genetic or physical

    When an abortion can be carried out

    Under UK law, an abortion can usually only be carried out during the first 24 weeks of pregnancy as long as certain criteria are met (see below).

    The Abortion Act 1967 covers England, Scotland and Wales but not Northern Ireland, and states:

    abortions must be carried out in a hospital or a specialist licensed clinic
    two doctors must agree that an abortion would cause less damage to a woman’s physical or mental health than continuing with the pregnancy

    There are also a number of rarer situations when the law states an abortion may be carried out after 24 weeks. These include:

    if it’s necessary to save the woman’s life

    to prevent grave permanent injury to the physical or mental health of the pregnant woman

    if there is substantial risk that the child would be born with serious physical or mental disabilities

    Generally, an abortion should be carried out as early in the pregnancy as possible, usually before 12 weeks and ideally before 9 weeks where possible.

    Before an abortion can proceed, two doctors must ensure that the requirements of the Abortion Act are fulfilled, and they must both sign the relevant certificate.

    Although it’s often very helpful to talk through the options with your GP or a family planning nurse before being referred, it’s possible to refer yourself for an NHS abortion in some parts of the country.

    Risks

    No clinical procedure is entirely risk free, but abortion poses few risks to a woman’s physical health, particularly when carried out as early as possible in the pregnancy (preferably during the first 12 weeks).

    Having an abortion will not usually affect your chances of becoming pregnant and having normal pregnancies in future.

    The risk of problems occurring during an abortion is low. However, there are more likely to be problems if an abortion is carried out later in a pregnancy.



    Report abuse

  • @OP – South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley signed a bill on Wednesday that bans abortions 20 weeks after conception.

    As the optimum time for abortions is 9 t0 12 weeks, this should accommodate the majority of requirements – provided that services are promptly available when needed.



    Report abuse

Leave a Reply

View our comment policy.