Baghdad bombing: Iraqis remind world that most of Isis’ victims are Muslims after more than 160 killed

Jul 5, 2016

By Lizzie Dearden

As Iraq continues to reel from a bombing that killed more than 160 people, Muslims are reminding the world that the majority of Isis’ victims are from the religion it claims to represent.

The hashtag #IsisAttackingMuslims was trending on Tuesday morning as people voiced their sorrow and outrage.

“They thrive on blood, any kind of it and Muslims’ blood is no exception,” one person wrote. “We are all against those enemies of humanity.”


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31 comments on “Baghdad bombing: Iraqis remind world that most of Isis’ victims are Muslims after more than 160 killed

  • Many people were sharing an image bearing the slogan: “Isis is bombing Muslims in Muslim countries in the holy month of Ramadan. And you still say Isis represents Islam?”

    Errrr… well no I think they actually represent a militant offshoot of the Tooting and Mitcham Popular front!



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  • Many people were sharing an image bearing the slogan: “Isis is bombing Muslims in Muslim countries in the holy month of Ramadan. And you still say Isis represents Islam?”

    This statement shows a lack of understanding of the sects and denominations of Islam!

    ISIS represents a particular sect of Sunni/Wahbi Islam!

    We could have created a similar “denial of the religious connection strawman”, in Ireland a few years ago!

    The (Catholic) IRA is bombing (Protestant) Christians in Christian countries in the holy period of Lent. And you still say “the IRA represents Christians?”



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  • 3
    Pinball1970 says:

    @#2 The (Catholic) IRA is bombing (Protestant) Christians in Christian countries in the holy period of Lent. And you still say “the IRA represents Christians?”

    Catholics killed protestants because they were protestants but they did not kill because they were catholics.

    Phil would disagree with me on this as he says this is more than just the book and it is but the new testament does not request war is raged on other religions.

    Jesus did not personally take part in any violent acts, if he did they were not reported.

    He also said some nicer stuff about ones enemies.

    The Koran does say to wage war and Mohammed did take part in historical tribal wars according to various accounts.



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  • @Pinball1970
    “Jesus did not personally take part in any violent acts, if he did they were not reported”
    did jesus use force to ‘drive’ the moneychangers out of the temple?
    to paraphrase RD “i’d love to know what really went on back then”



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  • Pin

    I have always said the Koran is honed to perfection to motivate people in its military first outing, to unify the arabian peninsula. It does pretty well for something similar now.

    The new testament remained a mess after much editing centuries later. Its task was to swap original sin (eternal guilt) for a softer eternal guilt tripping. (Typical parent trying to wheedle affection and obedience out of an offspring. I had a really painful time for you…a whole weekend!) Yep its got more soppy bits and is usefully still a mess.

    But religous people don’t read the things and anyway would rather wait to be told what to think. Thats the key to tractability.



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  • Well, since Jesus depicted in the new testament was about as real as Sherlock Holmes, I suppose that they could go to town on his super-human powers of humility and pacifism. A real Jesus would have been just as much of a psychopathic nutter as Mo……



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  • 7
    Pinball1970 says:

    @ #4 5 and 6

    Whether the accounts are true or not is not the issue, believers think they are true.

    Christians think Jesus was the perfect man/ god and Muslims think Mohammed was the perfect man/last prophet.

    The historical character Jesus ( evidence suggests such a person existed) was overwhelmingly peaceful compared to the character Mohammed.

    There is nothing in the NT that would instruct a Protestant to drag a catholic out from his home and shoot him in the face in front of his kids.

    There is plenty in the Koran, all the way through it in fact, to justify acts of violence to pagans, jews and unbelievers.

    @quarecuss

    Throwing some tables and shouting at money changers is hardly comparable to approving the beheading of prisoners.

    Jesus is a hippy / Wolfie Smith tye of guy compared to Mohammed, who is more of a Vlad the impaler type.



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  • The electricians bible, BS7671, needs full knowledge in order to sift through and work out just what is needed to complete the job. It is not about knowing all the contents but how to use the book. Many don’t bother and go on what others tell them. Those that try find one regulation and don’t associate with another and either spend more money than is needed or install an unsafe system. Our ‘priests’, the NICEIC inspectors are supposed to be the last word and I had to keep three of them happy in three different areas. Each had their own interpretation and ability.

    Jesus was brought to life by Paul, as far as I know or care, and the rest of the bible was born to bring customs and nuances together to unify. Mostly the Muslim version was a copy of that and a running history report. None of it is worth the paper it is written on.



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  • These people are crazy. Usually, you kill your enemies, people who are trying to harm you. ISIS are killing people almost randomly. They are violating Islamic traditions while claiming to be ultra Godly. It is like their goal is just to convince people they are crazy and mindlessly evil. It is as though instilling fear were their only goal.



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  • Rowdy #9

    To me, if it doesn’t sound right then it probably isn’t. How many of these attacks are just political and blamed on ISIS for convenience? I wonder what future historians will uncover and why they are not doing so now?



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  • Pinball1970 #7
    Jul 7, 2016 at 4:03 am

    Whether the accounts are true or not is not the issue, believers think they are true.

    The historical character Jesus (evidence suggests such a person existed) was overwhelmingly peaceful compared to the character Mohammed.

    Ah! But that is the mythological record written by faith-thinkers!

    Interestingly his recent RCC religious “peace spreading” reincarnation, has been demonstrating the faith-thinker’s techniques recording “war is peace”, claims!

    https://www.richarddawkins.net/2016/07/isis-seems-to-tailor-attacks-for-different-audiences/#li-comment-206873

    Tony Blair says the world would be “in a worse position” had he not taken the decision to invade Iraq.



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  • Pinball #7

    The historical character Jesus ( evidence suggests such a person existed) was overwhelmingly peaceful compared to the character Mohammed.

    What evidence? nearly all the materials I have read, suggest that on the balance of probabilities, the Jesus story is a mish mash of prior mythical men. Nowhere , have I read, that the story of Jesus is biography of an actual person! Where is the evidence to tip the balance?



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  • 11,

    Tony Blair says the world would be “in a worse position” had he not taken the decision to invade Iraq.

    Maybe so, maybe not – We (in this position down the arrow of time) are in no position to guess any of the alternative universes that would have existed had Blair not joined in with the Septic’s plans.



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  • 15
    Pinball1970 says:

    @#11 & 12

    Lets go for an expert, she also happens to be an atheist (since you will not take my word for it.)

    Francesca Stavrakopoulou has said and I quote, “most scholars would agree that a character called jesus existed.”

    She is more of an OT scholar than a jesus expert but I am guessing she will be aware of “most Scholars”

    Even Hitchens (and RD for that matter) accepted a jesus type preacher could have existed

    However as I said earlier, Jesus could have been a scythe wielding maniac or as made up Thor, this does not matter!

    What matters is what made it into the accepted scripture and from there was get doctrines and established religion.

    Can I ask a question? Is there a logical pathway from the new testament accounts of jesus to terror activities?

    Is there a logical pathway from the koran to violent activity?

    Please note the “logical” I am hoping Anders Breivik and Hitler wont feature in the answers.



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  • Pinball1970 #15
    Jul 7, 2016 at 8:44 am

    Can I ask a question? Is there a logical pathway from the new testament accounts of jesus to terror activities?

    Theistic pathways are always tortuous, but the Spanish inquisition (Europe and Americas), and the crusaders seemed to have found pathways!

    http://physics.ucr.edu/~wudka/Physics7/Notes_www/node52.html
    In 1633 Galileo was formally interrogated for 18 days and on April 30 Galileo confesses that he may have made the Copernican case in the Dialogue too strong and offers to refute it in his next book. Unmoved, the Pope decides that Galileo should be imprisoned indefinitely. Soon after, with a formal threat of torture, Galileo is examined by the Inquisition and sentenced to prison and religious penances, the sentence is signed by 6 of the 10 inquisitors

    For others, it was the fiery stake with no options!



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  • 17
    Pinball1970 says:

    @16
    I refuse to accept all religions are equally bad- it just is not true

    Crusades…yes and the texts / scripture that inspired that?

    Something jesus did said alluded to?



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  • Pinball1970 #17
    Jul 7, 2016 at 12:06 pm

    @16
    I refuse to accept all religions are equally bad- it just is not true

    I don’t think any informed people think that.

    Crusades…yes and the texts / scripture that inspired that?

    That’s getting nearer the psychology of “Locust swam thread”!

    Something jesus did said alluded to?

    Anything which Jesus is claimed to have said is either made up by Paul/Saul or selected from available myths, as best suited to the purposes of the Roman Empire, by Athanasius and the Roman bishops in the 4th century.

    Although neither the 4 canonical gospels nor any others were written within decades or centuries of supposed events, here are some of the mythical gospels which did not not make the NT edit!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gnostic_Gospels#Selected_gospels

    Though there are many documents that could be included among the gnostic gospels, the term most commonly refers to the following:

    Gospel of Mary (recovered in 1896)[22]
    Gospel of Thomas (versions found in Oxyrhynchus,
    Egypt in 1898, and again in the Nag Hammadi Library)[23]
    Gospel of Truth (Nag Hammadi Library)
    Gospel of Philip (Nag Hammadi Library) 4 Period
    Gospel of Judas (recovered via the antiquities black market in 1983,
    and then reconstructed in 2006)




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  • Pinball #15

    Francesca Stavrakopoulou has said and I quote, “most scholars would agree that a character called jesus existed.”

    Well, Raphael Lataster, is a Religious Studies scholar, his book “There was no Jesus, there is no God” (ISBN 9781492234418) systematically debunks most of the arguments that religious apologists put forward!
    Also Timothy Freke & Peter Gandy have penned, “The Laughing Jesus”, (ISBN 978-1-90504-781-9), “The Jesus Mysteries”, (ISBN 0-7225-3677-1) and “Jesus and the Lost Goddess” (ISBN 1-4000-4594-0) – these books look at “Mystery religions” (Gnostic) and how they fashioned early Christianity. Timothy Freek has a degree in philosophy and Peter Gandy specialises in ancient mystery religions. These books all paint Jesus as a mythical being based on Mithras, or any number of god-myth-men who died for something or other……
    Incidentally I never had you down as a religious sympathiser? When every man woman & child on planet earth realise that religions are as real as “Star wars” – mankind will have truly reached his “enlightened” epoch! Mind, you religious nut jobs will have destroyed mankind before that happens most likely!



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  • I refuse to accept all expressions of religion are equally bad.

    I think the statistics surely show European Christians more tolerant say than Middle Eastern followers of Islam. That doesn’t apply when confronting individuals though.

    The point is allowing the capacity of religious folk to improve and making the complaints of the religious about their moral failures (a failure of truth telling is a moral failure). The problem is ever and always about the morals of the individual in question.

    Celebration and encouragement is not a political tool unless it applies to the deltas, the cultural journeys undertaken by individual communities and societies. Tunisia’s direction is worthy of great reward whilst that of Mississippi should come in for sustained criticism. In absolute terms I suspect even as an atheist I may have a slightly easier time in Mississippi, though. But its not the moral league so much as the changes in it that should engage our attention and our political efforts.



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  • I refuse to accept all religions are equally bad- it just is not true

    I refuse to accept all the violence is attributed to religion. Too easy!!



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  • 22
    Pinball1970 says:

    @#19 ill check that out holts thanks.
    I am not an apologist either btw
    My posts were just a comparison of the texts and the characters real or not.
    I think we can move on.



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  • Ok, all, mind U.

    I refuse to accept all expressions of religion are equally bad.

    Define, “bad” – I would suggest that all religions and the fundamentals that support them are equally “wrong”.
    I myself like the eating, drinking, bonfires and sex involved with the old pagan creeds, but my celebration’s are just to reinforce my love of life – with no nod to any supernatural forces whatsoever!



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  • 24
    Pinball1970 says:

    @phil “In absolute terms I suspect even as an atheist I may have a slightly easier time in Mississippi,”

    Than say Saudi, Bangladesh, Pakistan or Yemen yes.
    Christianity has grown up or has been forced to in Europe, the situation is different in the states where you are not allowed to hold public office if you are an atheist apparently (a quick google)
    All southern states, Mississippi included.

    Something I didn’t know, is that not unconstitutional?



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  • 25
    Pinball1970 says:

    @21 no one said ALL violence.
    If you take the religion out of the equation surely the suicide bomber would hang up his vest?
    What would the effect be regarding violence towards women and LGBT if religion was not part of the equation?
    The landscape is the culture and religion, difficult to tease those things apart.
    The agenda and driving force is the politics, the here and now.
    More generally if you think you are killing in god’s name and he is watching I imagine that is a pretty powerful motivator.



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  • PB #25

    That is what I want. A true reflection of the here and now which is religion yes but to the west, that didn’t matter as much before we attacked Iraq. Being gay in Turkey is still outlawed but still the biggest stars are gay. Women in some quarters are equal but are fast losing ground in others. The suicide bomber would still have political motives. I have to be clear in that I hear the same rhetoric from the Muslim side. The EU is a Christian club, they are killing us because we are Muslim, they want to divide and conquer us for our oil etc etc etc…. It helps nothing. Precision, as best we can at least, will kill hearsay as will direct action. Corbyn has apologised for his entire party after the Chilcot report. I gave a sigh of relief. Maybe millions more did too.



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  • The Glasgow shop-keeper murder is a very clear case of an obsessive from one Sunni Islamic sect killing one from another sect!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-36733744
    A 32-year-old man has admitted murdering a Glasgow shopkeeper in a religiously motivated attack.

    Tanveer Ahmed, from Bradford in Yorkshire, attacked Asad Shah outside his store in the Shawlands area on 24 March. Mr Shah later died in hospital.

    The 40-year-old was stabbed after publishing hundreds of videos about his spiritual beliefs online.

    Mr Shah was an Ahmadiyya, a group known for its peaceful interfaith concerns. Ahmed said he had “disrespected” Islam.

    He pled guilty to the murder at a hearing at the High Court in Glasgow. Sentence was deferred until 9 August and Ahmed was remanded in custody.

    Advocate depute Iain McSporran, prosecuting, said: “The accused’s consistent and repeated account as to his motivation for murdering Asad Shah was that Shah claimed to be a prophet, which so offended his feelings and his faith that he had to kill him.”



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  • PB #24

    The comparison was specifically with Tunisia because of the moral progress it is currently making, whilst Mississippi is currently making none, or little or even going backwards. I will not praise a country and its current culture for the forces that shaped its history if those have now waned. (I will though praise the culture it once was.)



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  • phil rimmer #29
    Jul 8, 2016 at 6:32 am

    The comparison was specifically with Tunisia because of the moral progress it is currently making, whilst Mississippi is currently making none, or little or even going backwards.

    I see that Texas is not doing too well either, with tribalism and gun-culture again raising their heads!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-36742692

    Dallas: Protest turns to panic as shots fired

    Five Dallas police officers have been killed and six wounded by gunmen during protests against the shooting of black men by police, authorities say.

    Three people are in custody and one man who was in a stand-off with police shot himself dead, US media have reported.



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  • 31
    bonnie2 says:

    @ #24 – is that not unconstitutional?

    Correct, cannot be enforced. Naturally tho, there is the court of public opinion.

    A two lane highway, flanked by southern Illinois wildflowers, leads to a small town coffee house. Outwardly, I’d blend into the crowd except for this, replete with u.s. flag in front. I ‘spects an atheist would have to fake it to make it (public office) here.



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