Political Progress for Nonreligious Americans

Aug 9, 2016

By David Niose

Secular Americans, long ignored in the realm of politics, are finally starting to be seen as a group to be reckoned with. In a sign of the nonreligious sector’s growing numbers and political muscle, a resolution validating the group was enthusiastically passed by the influential LGBT Caucus at the Democratic National Convention in July. The resolution recognizes the “value, ethical soundness, and importance of the religiously unaffiliated demographic” and states that the nonreligious “are a group that, as much as any other, advocates for rational public policy based on sound science and universal humanistic values.” The full resolution can be seen here.

No major party or caucus has ever so expressly acknowledged the importance of the nonreligious sector (sometimes referred to as the “Nones,” for answering “none” on surveys asking for religious affiliation). Put forward by Massachusetts Democratic activist Stephen Driscoll, the resolution calls the Nones “important partners with the LGBT community in the fight against religious privilege and religion-based discrimination, which represents the next great civil rights battle.”

Those last words are key. With claims of “religious freedom” increasingly being used by religious conservatives to deny equality to the LGBT community, the value of the nonreligious demographic, which tends to be highly skeptical of religion as a tool for discrimination, becomes apparent. As Larry Decker of the Secular Coalition for America explains, “Now that the same-sex marriage issue is resolved, the next big battle for the gay rights movement is the issue of religious privilege.”


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2 comments on “Political Progress for Nonreligious Americans

  • @OP – As Larry Decker of the Secular Coalition for America explains, “Now that the same-sex marriage issue is resolved, the next big battle for the gay rights movement is the issue of religious privilege.”

    I am sure the religious (and particularly the fundamentalist religious), will continue to produce a long list of issues where “This is our right to impose our religion on you”, will be claimed as a “religious freedom” or “moral prerogative”!
    They, and any apologist followers, will need to be firmly told, that discriminatory bigotry, just because it has a self-awarded religion badge, does not get a free pass!



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  • The problem is policitians saying absurd religious things is the norm. We have to start reporting it anyway, with some diapprobation. To a policitian, there appears no downside to expressing creationist twaddle.

    We also want to encourage people to write these politicians balling them out.



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