World’s hottest month shows challenges global warming will bring

Aug 17, 2016

By Emma Graham-Harrison

In Siberia, melting permafrost released anthrax that had been frozen in a reindeer carcass for decades, starting a deadly outbreak. In Baghdad, soaring temperatures forced the government to shut down for days at a time. In Kuwait, thermometers hit a record 54C (129F).

July was the hottest month the world has endured since records began in 1880, scientists have said, and brought a painful taste of the troubles people around the world may have to grapple with as global warming intensifies. Results compiled by Nasa showed the month was 0.84C hotter than the 1951-1980 average for July, and 0.11C hotter than the previous record set in July 2015.

The temperature increase last month was not all due to climate change. Part of the increase came from the tail end of the El Niño phenomenon, which spreads warm water across the Pacific, giving a boost to global temperatures.


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10 comments on “World’s hottest month shows challenges global warming will bring

  • @OP In Siberia, melting permafrost released anthrax that had been frozen in a reindeer carcass for decades, starting a deadly outbreak.

    As the planet warms and the climate belts move towards the poles, we can expect tropical diseases, along with the insects which carry them, to also move into what are at present temperate climates.

    Human world-wide transport systems may well speed and help this process!



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  • @OP – July was the hottest month the world has endured since records began in 1880, scientists have said, and brought a painful taste of the troubles people around the world may have to grapple with as global warming intensifies.

    Some of the climate change deniers of the southern USA, are now up to their necks in record-breaking levels of floodwater, and while there are too many random factors affecting weather to directly attribute particular individual floods, to global warming, the evidence is that more and more intense floods and storms are the future this trend leads us to.

    http://www.nola.com/weather/index.ssf/2016/08/in_louisiana_flooding_rivers_l.html

    August flooding across south Louisiana was so deep and brisk that it broke records at six U.S. Geological Survey stream gauges. It also broke 14 of the stream gauges, which were overcome by water or damaged by debris in fast-moving rivers, the agency said Thursday (Aug. 18).

    The agency had 33 gauges registering rainfall and stream depth in the 20 parishes affected by the Louisiana Flood of 2016. Six of the gauges registered record depths, with four of those at gauges in operation more than 30 years, and two gauges measured streams rising 30 feet in two to three days, officials said.

    Here are three of the record levels:

    Comite River at Comite — Almost 34 feet on Sunday. Previous record was slightly more than 30 feet on May 19, 1953.
    Amite River near Denham Springs — More than 45 feet on Sunday. Record was slightly more than 40 feet on April 8, 1983.
    Amite River near French Settlement — Slightly more than 9 feet on Tuesday. Record was slightly more than 7 feet on April 25, 1977.

    Who gets the floods, and when, remains uncertain, but more of the same is indicated from the global measurements!



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  • 6
    Pinball1970 says:

    US elections have prompted the BBC feature a few items on how Obama’s term has affect coal production leading some pit closures.

    Bad news for coal but better news for sustainable energy.

    The solar panel industry is growing and some of the stats were impressive and encouraging.

    I don’t know enough about the details but it suggested some trends are now heading the right direction.

    Whether this is too little too late is another question.

    Perhaps other posters have seen these features?



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  • Pinball1970 #6
    Aug 24, 2016 at 8:12 am

    I don’t know enough about the details but it suggested some trends are now heading the right direction.

    I see Scotland is still leading the way on many renewables:-

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-business-37212373
    Shetland turbines at Bluemull Sound connected to grid
    Turbines installed off the coast of Shetland could herald a “new era” in tidal energy, according to the company running the project.
    Tidal energy specialist Nova Innovation said they were the first offshore tidal turbines in the world to deliver electricity to the grid.

    Two 100kW turbines have been installed so far in the Shetland Tidal Array at Bluemull Sound.

    The blades for the turbines were made by Shetland Composites.

    Edinburgh-based Nova Innovation said tidal energy was a “long-term source” of predictable renewable power, with the turbines generating to full power across all tidal conditions.

    Simon Forrest, managing director of Nova Innovation, said: “We are absolutely delighted to be the first company in the world to deploy a fully operational tidal array.”

    Mr Forrest said the deployment of the second turbine showcased the technology.

    The UK Carbon Trust estimates a £126bn global tidal energy market could be developed by 2050.

    WWF Scotland said the turbines were another “major milestone” on Scotland’s journey to becoming a “fully renewable nation”.

    The charity’s director in Scotland, Lang Banks, added: “With some of the most powerful tides in Europe, Scotland is well placed to lead in developing this promising technology, which will help to cut climate emissions and create green jobs right across the country.”

    Jenny Hogan, director of policy at Scottish Renewables, said: “Scotland is already at the forefront of capturing power from the tides and waves, and Nova’s latest news demonstrates that lead is well-deserved.

    “The country is already home to some of the most advanced marine energy technologies anywhere, as well as the European Marine Energy Centre: arguably the most advanced marine energy proving site in the world.



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  • Pinball1970 #6
    Aug 24, 2016 at 8:12 am

    US elections have prompted the BBC feature a few items on how Obama’s term has affect coal production leading some pit closures.

    Bad news for coal but better news for sustainable energy.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-37265541
    Signing up to cut emissions means China will have to move away from coal power
    China’s top legislature has ratified the Paris global climate agreement, state news agency Xinhua reports.

    The country is the world’s largest emitter of harmful CO2 emissions, which cause climate change.

    China and the US are expected to jointly announce ratification at a bilateral summit later on Saturday.

    In a landmark deal struck in December, countries agreed to cut emissions enough to keep the global average rise in temperatures below 2C.

    Members of China’s National People’s Congress Standing Committee adopted “the proposal to review and ratify the Paris Agreement” on Saturday morning at the end of a week-long session.

    The Paris deal is the world’s first comprehensive climate agreement. It will only come into force legally after it is ratified by at least 55 countries, which between them produce 55% of global carbon emissions.

    Analysis: BBC environmental analyst Roger Harrabin

    This is a big step towards turning the Paris climate agreement into reality.

    Other nations will still tussle over their own ratification, but this will put pressure on G20 nations over the weekend to move faster with their pledge to phase out subsidies to fossil fuels.



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  • Hopefully others will now follow this lead, and the lame story that “action by small countries is pointless because big players can’t be moved”, will die the death!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-37265541
    The US and China – together responsible for 40% of the world’s carbon emissions – have now both ratified the Paris global climate agreement.
    After arriving with other leaders of G20 nations for a summit in the city of Hangzhou, Mr Obama said: “History will judge today’s effort as pivotal.”

    CO2 emissions are the driving force behind climate change.

    Last December, countries agreed to cut emissions enough to keep the global average rise in temperatures below 2C.

    Analysis: BBC environmental analyst Roger Harrabin

    Before China made its announcement, the 23 nations that had so far ratified the agreement accounted for just over 1% of emissions.

    The UK has yet to ratify the Paris deal. A spokesman for the prime minister told BBC News that the government would ratify as soon as possible – but gave no date.

    = = = = = = = =

    In a speech in Hangzhou, Mr Obama said the Paris deal was the “single best chance that have to deal with a problem that could end up transforming this planet”.

    He praised US and Chinese leadership on the climate issue, saying: “We are moving the world significantly towards the goal we have set.”



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