Civil rights or religious liberty — what’s on top?

Sep 19, 2016

By Joe Davidson

Jumping into the fray over civil liberties vs. religious freedom, the U.S. Civil Rights Commission issued a report Wednesday that is sure to anger conservatives with this central finding:

“Religious exemptions to the protections of civil rights based upon classifications such as race, color, national origin, sex, disability status, sexual orientation, and gender identity, when they are permissible, significantly infringe upon these civil rights,” the report said.

The chairman of the commission, Martin R. Castro, went to the hot spot of the debate with a separate statement in the report that uncloaks what often, but certainly not always, lurks behind protestations about freedom of religion.


Continue reading by clicking the name of the source below.

6 comments on “Civil rights or religious liberty — what’s on top?

  • The difference between civil rights and religious rights is:
    Civil rights let you be treated equally to anyone else.
    Religious rights let you bully others and treat some people much worse than others for arbitrary reasons.



    Report abuse

  • If you allow exception to laws on religious grounds, then you MUST be prepared to allow this equally for ALL religions. If someone claims that their religion demands that they disobey this statute or that statute, once you’ve set the precedent that religion trumps law (pun not intended but it does seem apt!), you cannot deny anyone the right to follow the dictates of their religion even if this contravenes the law of the land. You may say, “What about those who claim that some religion, of which they are the only follower gives them the right to???”. I say to you, who are you to judge whether or not anyone’s faith is genuine? Using a “Reductio ad absurdum” argument, it would be possible to literally get away with murder by claiming it wasn’t murder, but a human sacrifice demanded by my religion.



    Report abuse

  • ” …the U.S. Civil Rights Commission issued a report Wednesday…with this central finding: “Religious exemptions to the protections of civil rights based upon classifications such as race, color, national origin, sex, disability status, sexual orientation, and gender identity, when they are permissible, significantly infringe upon these civil rights,” the report said.

    Comprehensively, the report bans virtually all civil rights discrimination that most of us could think of. The only loose end left hanging is a woman’s reproductive rights or specifically the right to choose to have an abortion. Unimpeded construction of abortion clinics and unimpeded access to those clinics by patients should go forward into civil rights law and civil rights enforcement.



    Report abuse

  • @OP – “Religious exemptions to the protections of civil rights based upon classifications such as race, color, national origin, sex, disability status, sexual orientation, and gender identity, when they are permissible, significantly infringe upon these civil rights,” the report said.

    As I was commentating on another thread (Arab TV host cheers secular writer’s assassination on television #1), – The delusional religious have no respect for secular law, and feel at liberty to impose their own opinions as they see fit!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-37528317

    Alabama’s top judge has been suspended for the remainder of his term for defying federal court rulings that legalized same-sex marriage.
    Roy Moore, 69, violated judicial ethics with an order seen as directing probate judges to deny marriage licences to gay couples, a judicial panel ruled.

    The decision was a “politically motivated effort” by radical groups, he said. His lawyer has vowed to appeal.

    It is the second suspension for Mr Moore, an outspoken conservative.

    In 2003, he was removed for refusing to take down a monument of the Ten Commandments he installed at a state building.

    He was re-elected as chief justice of the state’s Supreme Court in 2012.

    In Friday’s decision, the nine-member Alabama Court of the Judiciary unanimously decided to suspend him for the remainder of his term without pay.

    The move essentially removes Mr Moore from the bench, as he will be unable to seek re-election at the end of his term, in January 2019, because of age restrictions, his lawyer Mat Staver said.

    Reacting to the decision, Mr Moore said in a statement: “This was a politically motivated effort by radical homosexual and transgender groups to remove me as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court because of outspoken opposition to their immoral agenda.”

    The panel found that Mr Moore’s ruling in 6 January showed “disregard for binding federal law” after the US Supreme Court landmark decision in June 2015 affirming gay marriage rights.



    Report abuse

Leave a Reply

View our comment policy.