After Dinosaur Extinction, Some Insects Recovered More Quickly

Nov 8, 2016

By Nicholas St. Fleur

The asteroid that smashed into the Earth near Chicxulub, Mexico, some 66 million years ago annihilated the dinosaurs and obliterated about 75 percent of all plant and animal species on Earth. The devastation affected insects living thousands of miles north and south of the impact zone as well.

In western North America, earlier research found that it took nine million years for ancient insects to recover from the extinction event. But on the other side of the world, in South America’s Patagonia region, new findings suggest that the insects bounced back twice as fast.

Scientists don’t know why the two regions rebounded at different rates, but studies of fossilized leaves with nibbles and bite marks from insects showed evidence of Patagonia’s speedier recovery.


Continue reading by clicking the name of the source below.

One comment on “After Dinosaur Extinction, Some Insects Recovered More Quickly”

  • @OP – In western North America, earlier research found that it took nine million years for ancient insects to recover from the extinction event. But on the other side of the world, in South America’s Patagonia region, new findings suggest that the insects bounced back twice as fast.

    If this was related to dust or some contaminants circulating in the atmosphere or wind, Patagonia has mainly ocean to the east and west of it which would remove dust once it landed, with the continents positioned as they were at that time.

    There were also warm equatorial currents heading to Antarctica in this period.

    http://www.bobspixels.com/kaibab.org/geology/gc065mya.htm



    Report abuse

Leave a Reply

View our comment policy.