Coming Out Atheist, pg 64

Nov 14, 2016

“About 5-15% of all Americans are atheists or other nonbelievers. Those numbers are even higher in many other parts of the world; In some countries, it’s as high as 65%, and possibly even 85%. That’s according to fairly conservative estimates, and the fact that many nonbelievers are uncomfortable saying so – even to themselves. And those numbers are on the rise. So the chances that you’re only the atheist in your neck of the woods are pretty darned small. The chances are excellent that other folks are out there, not far from you, wondering the same things you’re wondering , and feeling just as alone as you are. So check out the organization in the resource guide that sponsor local communities, and ask for information about how to start an atheist group. Or heck – just go to Meetup.com, and hit ‘Start group.'”

–Greta Christina, Coming Out Atheist, pg 64

8 comments on “Coming Out Atheist, pg 64

  • Here in the Netherlands, a census of 2013 revealed the following:
    18% openly religious (A large part of that immigrant muslims)
    26% openly secular
    56% agnostics/nones
    So, in all, 82% of the population is not religiously affiliated; thank god 🙂



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  • I’m about to make an American-centric point, so forgive me that, but I would be interested in knowing what the statistics are for the non-religious in rural areas of the US? Most of the statistics one finds are for the whole of the US, but it stands to reason that most people who identify as being not religiously affiliated are in cities and more populated areas, so I wonder what chances a rural atheist has in finding someone of like mind?



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  • Laura Mehlhaff #2
    Nov 16, 2016 at 4:14 pm

    I’m about to make an American-centric point, so forgive me that, but I would be interested in knowing what the statistics are for the non-religious in rural areas of the US? Most of the statistics one finds are for the whole of the US, but it stands to reason that most people who identify as being not religiously affiliated are in cities and more populated areas, so I wonder what chances a rural atheist has in finding someone of like mind?

    I don’t know, but these links could give you some starting points using the internet to track down a group which meets in your locality.

    http://www.worldatlas.com/articles/states-with-the-most-atheism-in-america.html

    http://www.seculardirectory.org/national-u-s-a/



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  • I am from a small village in India,a country which is known for its diversity. Among her 29 states, mine is a place where you can see Hindus, Muslims and Christians together. A place where brotherhood is beyond religions. You can even be an atheist here. But I think, nowadays, this is changing. People are more into fighting and supporting and doing and saying foolish, rubbish and cruel things in the name of God. Nowadays, its hard to find an atheist here. A journey from secularism to extremism. Its frightening. Although people like this are only very few, but they are here now. There was some news that one or two people went to ISIS. Don’t know the truth. Even though its a very negligible number now, its a frightening news.



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  • 6
    fadeordraw says:

    So 1stly, the 5-15% is horseshit. I’m a stats guy and I don’t like stats without sources. But that one puts the USA in the Neanderthal era. The import of the paragraph is approaching atheists as a rare disease or guy or a coming out of the closet experience one needs to prepare for. Outside of radical Christian families and community experiences, for most atheists/pro-science humanitarians it’d be like leaving home for college (one’s own interpretation of the world, rather than one’s parents, that needs time to spread). I think the stats would be very high were the question: atheists/pro-science humanitarian or not? Note: Trump would check off one of the many Christian boxes when asked, but he’s atheists/pro-science (that’s how one makes money), but the humanitarian box?



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  • Having just personally come out to family and friends, I’m finding the process less difficult than I’d expected, in terms of interactions with friends and locals, even in my conservative and religious area. Being open as I meet new people brings up interesting conversations right at the start, and talking to current friends let’s me find common ground. I’ve also found quite a few like-minded people already in my circle. Dealing with family has been the hardest part of the process. It causes a lot of fear and sadness, depending on their depth of faith. But I’m finding far more acceptance than I ever expected and I’m glad I finally stepped out. Southern California is probably one of the friendlier parts of the country though, in terms of accepting difference.



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  • fadeordraw #6
    Nov 17, 2016 at 9:50 pm

    Note: Trump would check off one of the many Christian boxes when asked, but he’s atheists/pro-science (that’s how one makes money), but the humanitarian box?

    As a Climate change denier and pathological opponent of wind-farms, Trump is certainly not “pro-science”, although he may employ competent people on specific aspects of projects.
    His antics in Aberdeen not only illustrated his science denial, but also illustrated his denial of economics in his pretences that Trump golf courses were the most important key element in the area’s economic development as a major port and energy hub! – Laughable ego-centric delusional incompetence – or blatant lies!



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