New UN climate chief: ‘Action on warming unstoppable’

Feb 27, 2017

By Roger Harrabin

The UN’s new climate chief says she’s worried about President Donald Trump – but confident that action to curb climate change is unstoppable.

President Trump said he’d withdraw from the UN climate deal and stop funding the UN’s clean energy programme.

But former Mexican diplomat Patricia Espinosa told BBC News that the delay in any firm announcement suggests the issue is still unresolved.

She travels to US this weekend to try and meet the new US secretary of state.

‘World will carry on’

Ms Espinosa said it would be more damaging for the US to leave the on-going climate talks process altogether than to stop funding the clean energy programme.

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4 comments on “New UN climate chief: ‘Action on warming unstoppable’

  • 1
    Robert Firth says:

    Former Mexican diplomat? Is this the Mexico that “pledged” in 2005 to stabilise CO2 emissions, and then proceeded to do no such thing? On current projections, Mexico will by 2020 have increased its carbon emissions by almost 50% over 2005.

    What seems to be “unstoppable” is the endless flow of empty promises, broken pledges, and blatant lies that is all these diplomats seem to say about climate change. And likewise the smug greener-than-thou lectures of people who mistake a swamp of deceit for the moral high ground.

    The truth is this: it is runaway climate change that is now unstoppable. We crossed that line in 2007 when we triggered the methane gun, and at that moment it was game over.



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  • Robert Firth #1
    Mar 1, 2017 at 9:26 pm

    The truth is this: it is runaway climate change that is now unstoppable. We crossed that line in 2007 when we triggered the methane gun, and at that moment it was game over.

    The present year on year rise in temperatures is inevitable for some years to come, but we are probably not into the area of clathrate bomb runaway climate change yet.
    That is likely to need another two or three degrees.

    What is needed at present, is to stop adding more fossil CO2 or leaked methane to the atmosphere, and make preparations to adapt to the climate changes which are already in the pipeline. –
    ( That is:- coastal flooding, increased desertification in the Tropics, climate belts moving towards the poles, increased rainfall in temperate zones, loss of mountain ice caps and seasonal irrigation water, and increased extent and power of droughts, floods and storms from a more energised and mobile atmosphere.)



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  • @OP – The UN’s new climate chief says she’s worried about President Donald Trump – but confident that action to curb climate change is unstoppable.

    Robert Firth #1
    Mar 1, 2017 at 9:26 pm

    Former Mexican diplomat? Is this the Mexico that “pledged” in 2005 to stabilise CO2 emissions, and then proceeded to do no such thing?

    She is speaking for the UN, not Mexico!

    On current projections, Mexico will by 2020 have increased its carbon emissions by almost 50% over 2005.

    While it is undesirable for Mexico to increase emissions, given their ranking as causing 1.28% of world CO2 pollution, for both their overall emissions and per-capita emissions, this is less of an issue than for the 14 other countries whose output is larger than theirs! (China 29.55%. USA 14.95%, European Union 9.57%, India 6.56%)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_carbon_dioxide_emissions



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  • While Trump is trying to drag America backwards into the coal-powered 19the century steam-age, – in some places the changes do seem unstoppable!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-39181753

    A collapse in the use of coal has driven UK carbon emissions down to levels barely seen since the Victorian era, new figures show.

    Coal use fell by a record 52% in 2016 on the previous year in the face of cheap gas, higher domestic carbon prices, renewables and other factors.

    The drop was partially offset by increased emissions from oil and gas.

    The results are based on analysis of government figures by the website Carbon Brief.

    The Department of Energy, Business and Industrial Strategy (Beis) is due to publish its own estimates on 30 March.

    One of the main reasons for the drop in coal use is the carbon price floor. This carbon tax doubled in 2015 to £18 per tonne of CO2.

    In his budget on Wednesday, the Chancellor Philip Hammond is expected to set out the future path for the tax. This could have wide-ranging implications for the planned phase out of coal and the cost of low-carbon power subsidies.

    Coal use has fallen by 74% since 2006 and is now 12 times below the peak of 221 millions of tonnes (Mt) burnt in 1956.

    While CO2 from coal fell drastically, carbon emissions from gas increased by 12.5% in 2016 as utilities switched from burning coal. CO2 from oil also went up, by 1.6%.

    Carbon emissions in 2016 reached 381 millions of tonnes (Mt) of CO2. With the exception of sharp dips caused by general strikes in the 1920s, this represents the lowest level since 1894, when Nicholas II became Tsar of Russia.

    There is still a need for a reduction in the use of oil and gas, but the progress with renewables is encouraging!



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