The Univ. of Central Florida Now Explicitly Features Resources for Atheists on Its Website

May 25, 2017

By Hemant Mehta

The University of Central Florida, one of the largest schools in the country with over 65,000 students and 10,000 faculty and staff members, has done something incredibly valuable for people who are not religious: They are making sure that students who are atheists (or part of religious minorities) have access to the same resources available to Christians.

What used to be the school’s page for Campus Faiths and Ministries is now a page dedicated to “Religion and Non-Religion.” It links to both faith-based groups (in case you’re looking for a place to worship) as well as “Humanist and Secular Services.”

Humanist and Secular support services provides resources, advocacy, and pastoral care from a Humanist perspective. Organizations serve students, faculty, and staff seeking community; meaning and purpose; assistance with life challenges; and other inner-life development, enrichment, and support. Resources include a secular student community, a Secular Safe Zone allies network, workshops and other advocacy promoting inclusion for people of all perspectives and worldviews, and connections to local, state, and national Humanist communities and services.

Those resources include contact information for the school’s voluntary Humanist Chaplain, Tee Rogers, in case students want to set up an appointment to discuss personal issues without someone telling them to trust in God to make everything better.

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One comment on “The Univ. of Central Florida Now Explicitly Features Resources for Atheists on Its Website”

  • @OP – Those resources include contact information for the school’s voluntary Humanist Chaplain, Tee Rogers,
    in case students want to set up an appointment to discuss personal issues without someone telling them to trust in God to make everything better.

    A personal professional counselling service will be useful for students with social or family problems, but those with secular or humanist philosophies, don’t need the constant reaffirmation of beliefs required to maintain indoctrination in theists, so there is likely to be less demand for this service, than for those with god-delusions confusing their thinking.



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