Kentucky Officials Have Ended the $18 Million Tax Rebate Deal With Ark Encounter

Jul 24, 2017

By Hemant Mehta

This is a big deal. And you can read more of the back story here.

Quick summary: The Creationists behind Ark Encounter initially said they were building a for-profit attraction in order to get a lot of perks, including a tourism-related tax rebate from the state of Kentucky worth more than $18 million over ten years. But after the city of Williamstown said they would add a 50-cent surcharge to all tickets to pay for a safety feeKen Ham‘s team sold Ark Encounter to their own non-profit, Crosswater Canyon, because religious ministries are exempt from that kind of tax.

Earlier today, the Freedom From Religion Foundation announced that they had sent a letter to the Kentucky Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet notifying them that, because of the sale and new non-profit status, Ark Encounter is violating the terms of the tax rebate deal.

Guess what? They didn’t need to do that. Because three days ago, a lawyer for the Kentucky Tourism, Arts, and Heritage Cabinet sent a letter to the lawyer for Ark Encounter saying the exact same thing.

Continue reading by clicking the name of the source below

6 comments on “Kentucky Officials Have Ended the $18 Million Tax Rebate Deal With Ark Encounter

  • It looks like Ham is running out of double-talk and having his cake and eating it!

    I wonder how all those YEC punters who in 2014 put up unsecured loans in Ham’s junk bonds, – with repayments based on revenue from ticket sales, are getting on?

    http://danielsilliman.blogspot.co.uk/2014/03/creationists-sell-enough-junk-bonds-to.html

    Creationists sell enough junk bonds to build an ark

    Against formidable odds and with dubious financials, Ark Encounter LLC has raised sufficient funds to start building a 510-foot replica of the most famous boat in the Bible.

    Ken Ham, the young earth creationist behind the project, made the announcement last week, in an online video presentation. After more than three years of planning and some delays, the construction of the ark is about to begin. (article from 2014)



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  • @OP – But after the city of Williamstown said they would add a 50-cent surcharge to all tickets to pay for a safety fee, Ken Ham‘s team sold Ark Encounter to their own non-profit, Crosswater Canyon,
    because religious ministries are exempt from that kind of tax.

    Safety fees for religious organisations! Preposterous! 🙂
    Think of the damage that would do to faith-healers in claims against them from those endangered by their interventions in medical treatments, – or the application of pseudo-science to the real world! – and safety inspectors!! – checking decisions based on faith-thinking!!!!!! – Horrors!!
    It’s enough to give a god-delusion a headache and convulsions!



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  • Now the “boat” will have to be scrapped. The loss of tax-exemption and the poor ticket sales will make this unfloatable “ship” a lead weight.
    The cost to maintain this structure will be staggering in a few years. If that many.
    Or, they could turn it into a homeless shelter. There is your Ark, to save people.
    It will more likely turn into a mounument of stupidity and then into firewood eventually.



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  • Ham has been involved in suspicious dealings in churches over here before he left for the USA according to some members of those churches, this doesn’t surprise me, he is a deeply dishonest man.



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  • https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/26/us/noahs-ark-creationism-ken-ham.html

    WILLIAMSTOWN, Ky. —
    In the beginning, Ken Ham made the Creation Museum in northern Kentucky. And he saw that it was good at spreading his belief that the Bible is a book of history, the universe is only 6,000 years old, and evolution is wrong and is leading to our moral downfall.

    And Mr. Ham said, let us build a gargantuan Noah’s ark only 45 minutes away to draw millions more visitors.
    And let it be constructed by Amish woodworkers, and financed with donations, junk bonds and tax rebates from the state of Kentucky.
    And let it hold an animatronic Noah and lifelike models of some of the creatures that came on board two-by-two, such as bears, short-necked giraffes — and juvenile Tyrannosaurus rexes.

    And it was so.

    Mr. Ham’s “Ark Encounter,” built at a cost of more than $102 million, is scheduled to open on July 7 [2016] in Williamstown,
    Ky. Mr. Ham and his crew have succeeded in erecting a colossal landmark and an ambitious promotional vehicle for their particular brand of Christian fundamentalism, known as “young earth” or “young universe” creationism.

    But it was hardly smooth sailing. The state tried to revoke the tax rebates after learning that Mr. Ham would require employees to sign a “statement of faith” that would exclude people who were gay or did not accept his particular Christian creed. Mr. Ham went to court and in January, he won.

    Yet his interpretation of what he calls “the Christian message” is derided by most scientists and educators, and resented even by some Christians who consider it indefensible and even embarrassing.

    Even the Vatican calls it “the wrong sort of creationism”!

    .. . and those darned archaeologists, showed that the Noah story was copied from an earlier story on a clay tablet about a Babylonian Ark, which saved a family and a few farm animals – and was round and made of reeds!
    Of course THAT Babylonian story, was not in Ham’s biblical exclusive source of “all [his] knowledge”!



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