Climate change did not “cause” Harvey, but it’s a huge part of the story

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By David Roberts

Several people have written some version of “what you can say about Hurricane Harvey and climate change” in the past few days. I’ll link to some of them below.

But I think they are all saying too little. There’s much more to say, so much more! In fact, here are nine things you can say about Harvey and climate change.

1) Harvey is not centrally about climate change

Talking about climate change during a disaster always runs the risk of insensitivity. The story that most matters about Harvey right now is the effect it’s having on lives and land in Texas and the efforts underway to prevent more suffering.

Continue reading by clicking the name of the source below.

5 COMMENTS

  1. @OP- Climate change did not “cause” Harvey, but it’s a huge part of the story.

    IRMA may also be “part of the story”!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-41156051

    The US state of Florida has declared a state of emergency.

    Hurricane warnings have been issued for the islands of
    Antigua and Barbuda, Anguilla, Montserrat, St Kitts and Nevis, St Martin,
    St Barthelemy, Saba, St Eustatius, Puerto Rico, British Virgin Islands and US Virgin Islands.
    It means that hurricane conditions are expected in the next 36 hours.

  2. The storms seem to be lining up in the Atlantic and heading for the Caribbean islands and the US, with record wind speeds and a huge tidal surge!

    [http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-41168117](http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-41168117](http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-41168117)

    Hurricane Irma, the most powerful Atlantic storm in a decade, has hit the Caribbean, with officials warning of its “potentially catastrophic” effects.

    The category five hurricane, the highest possible level, has sustained wind speeds reaching 300km/h (185mph).

    It first hit Antigua and Barbuda, before moving on to Saint Barthelemy and Saint Martin.

    It is then expected to move on towards Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

    In the US, Florida’s Key West area has ordered a mandatory evacuation.

    The French government, which runs Saint Barthélemy, more commonly known as St Barts, and Saint Martin, has said it is worried about thousands of people who have refused to seek shelter.

    Major flooding has been caused in their low-lying areas, said the French weather office.

    The eye of the storm first hit Barbuda, which has a population of around 2,000 people, at about 02:00 local time (06:00 GMT).

    Winds gusted at 250km/h, before the recording equipment broke and no further readings were received.

    Parts of Texas and Louisiana are dealing with the damage done by Hurricane Harvey in late August. But it is not yet clear what impact Hurricane Irma might have on the US mainland.

    The mainland has not been hit by two category four hurricanes in one season since the storms were first recorded in 1851.

    Meanwhile, a third tropical storm, Jose, has formed further out in the Atlantic behind Irma, and is expected to become a hurricane by later on Wednesday, according to the US National Hurricane Center.

  3. The damage to various Caribbean islands from IRMA seems to be massive! The effects of its track, and the amount of warmed waters it crosses, will determine future levels of destruction!

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/live/2017/sep/06/hurricane-irma-caribbean-islands-category-5-storm

    Hurricane Irma: Islands suffer huge damage as storm heads for Dominican Republic and Haiti – latest

    Most powerful hurricane ever recorded over Atlantic Ocean batters Barbuda, St Martin and Puerto Rico as it moves west with category 5 winds and rains

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