U.S. No Longer Playing Leading Role in UN’s LGBTQ Human Rights Group

Sep 28, 2017

By Julie Moreau

The 72nd session of the United Nations General Assembly concluded this week, and among the packed events during the two-week gathering was a meeting of the U.N.’s LGBTI Core Group. Now 9 years old, the group is composed of representatives from 26 member states, along with the U.N.’s Office of Human Rights and two advocacy organizations — Human Rights Watch and OutRight International. The group’s mission is to advocate for the rights of sexual and gender minorities globally, with an emphasis on ending violence and discrimination.

But while the U.S. had taken a leading role in the U.N. LGBTI Core Group during the Obama years, its participation this year was noticeably muted.

“Historic Advances”

U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein addressed the forum, noting the recent “historic advances” in LGBTQ rights globally, including Malta’s 2015 Gender Identity, Gender Expression and Sex Characteristics Act. The measure allows for individuals to alter identity documents to reflect their gender identity quickly, and without requirements to undergo medical evaluation or surgical procedures. The Act has been praised by intersex advocates because it prohibits any surgical intervention on children that can be deferred until the child is old enough to consent.

Maltese Prime Minister Joseph Muscat, also present, remarked on what he called the country’s “transformation” with respect to LGBTQ rights — from one that actively opposed European Union reforms regarding LGBTQ discrimination to one leading the European pack. “It can be done,” he said.

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One comment on “U.S. No Longer Playing Leading Role in UN’s LGBTQ Human Rights Group”

  • @OP – Maltese Prime Minister Joseph Muscat,
    also present, remarked on what he called the country’s “transformation” with respect to LGBTQ rights —
    from one that actively opposed European Union reforms regarding LGBTQ discrimination
    to one leading the European pack. “It can be done,” he said.

    Meanwhile – in the primitive theocratic backwaters of Egypt:-

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-41482001

    Egyptian authorities have arrested at least 22 people in the past four days as part of a campaign against LGBT people, Amnesty International says.

    Thirty-two men and one woman have now been detained since rainbow flags were displayed at a pop concert in Cairo last month, according to activists.

    Anal examinations have been reportedly carried out on five of those arrested.

    The flag-raising provoked a public outcry and prompted the public prosecutor to order an investigation.

    Homosexuality is not explicitly criminalised under Egyptian law.

    But the authorities routinely arrest people suspected of engaging in consensual homosexual conduct on charges of “debauchery”, “immorality” or “blasphemy”.



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