New Zealand Prime Minister Takes Non-Religious Oath of Office Without Bible

Oct 27, 2017

By Hemant Mehta

New Zealand just swore in its 40th Prime Minister, 37-year-old ex-Mormon-turned-Agnostic Jacinda Ardern.

Hours ago, she took her Oath of Allegiance (her oath of office) and Executive Council Oath.

And to the delight of non-religious people around the world, Ardern didn’t include the phrase “so help me God” at the end of either one. Nor did she place her hand on the Bible when she said them.

She also replaced the word “swear,” which could have religious overtones, with “solemnly, sincerely, and truly declare and affirm.”

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4 comments on “New Zealand Prime Minister Takes Non-Religious Oath of Office Without Bible

  • @OP – New Zealand just swore in its 40th Prime Minister, 37-year-old ex-Mormon-turned-Agnostic Jacinda Ardern.

    While refusing to swear on a bible is a sign of movement TOWARDS rational thinking, agnostics are usually somewhere BETWEEN an earlier religion and atheism!
    (I have never encountered an agnostic who is agnostic about ALL religions – Most dismiss most or all religions, except their own “default religion”)

    The key question, is therefore, “How much of her earlier Mormon culture and Mormon connections, has she retained – and from which faction did she come?!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mormons

    The word “Mormons” most often refers to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) because of their belief in the Book of Mormon, though members often refer to themselves as Latter-day Saints or sometimes just Saints.[15] The term “Mormons” has been embraced by most adherents of Mormonism, most notably Mormon fundamentalists,[16] while other Latter Day Saint denominations, such as the Community of Christ, have rejected it.[citation needed] Both LDS Church members (or “Latter-day Saints”) and members of fundamentalist groups commonly use the word “Mormon” in reference to themselves.[17] The LDS Church, however, disagrees with this self-characterization, and encourages the use of the word “Mormon” only in reference to LDS Church members.[18] Church leaders also encourage members to use the church’s full name to emphasize its focus on Jesus Christ.



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  • @OP – And to the delight of non-religious people around the world,
    Ardern didn’t include the phrase
    “so help me God” at the end of either one.
    Nor did she place her hand on the Bible when she said them.

    While I don’t want to sound too negative about this, we should still be cautious about an ex-member of an exclusive cult, which has a reputation for psychological manipulation, exploitation and fraud!



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  • Rest assured, Alan4discussion, that Jacinda Ardern is no Mormon. She is the daughter of Mormons but gave up Mormonism in her twenties, because it clashed with her own views on a few things. This article may give you some idea of the woman’s mindset and views on religion and politics. I think you will approve.



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  • Garrick #3
    Oct 30, 2017 at 11:39 am

    She is the daughter of Mormons but gave up Mormonism in her twenties, because it clashed with her own views on a few things.

    It does look as if she is Richard’s 6.9 type of agnostic, rather than the pseudo- 50/50 sort at Dawkins Scale 4, but there is still a need for caution in terms of her respect, for the religious not becoming “respect for religion”!
    God with a capital “G” is an indication of Biblical religious baggage!

    @ link – While Arden made the decision to renounce her Mormon faith and describes herself as agnostic — someone who believes the existence of God is unknowable —

    (Is the Hindu Elephant god “unknowable” as well?)

    she still respects people who choose to have religion as a foundation in their lives.

    If that “religious foundation”, involves the mindless following of doctrines and dogmas or forcing them on others, respect diminishes!

    @your link – Although she did add that she felt in some instances people were being taken advantage of, particularly in churches that require “tithing”, where members are expected to give one-tenth of their income to the church.

    This is somewhat of a statement of the obvious from a secular viewpoint!



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