Donald Trump lifts ban on importing elephant hunt trophies from Zimbabwe and Zambia

By Chris Baynes

Donald Trump‘s administration is to allow the remains of endangered elephants legally hunted in two African countries to be imported to the US, reversing a ban introduced by Barack Obama.

The US government has scrapped regulations which forbid elephant trophies being brought into the country from Zimbabweand Zambia, arguing hunting could help conservation efforts.

The Obama administration banned imports of trophies from Zimbabwe in 2014 after finding the nation’s management of legal hunting did not “enhance the survival of the African elephant the wild”.

The species is listed as “threatened” under the US Endangered Species Act and importing African elephant ivory to America is banned unless certain conditions are met.

But the US Fish and Wildlife Service, announcing the lifting of the ban in Zimbabwe and Zambia, said money raised through hunting permits could boost conservation efforts. “Legal, well-regulated sport hunting as part of a sound management programme can benefit the conservation of certain species by providing incentives to local communities to conserve the species and by putting much-needed revenue back into conservation,” a spokesman said.

Continue reading by clicking the name of the source below.

62 COMMENTS

  1. As one commenter aptly put it : “”…reversing a ban introduced by Barack Obama….” Thats all you need to know. If Obama had come up with a cure for cancer Trump would outlaw it just out of spite.”

    There is really no bar so low that this degenerate piece of trash in a suit can’t stoop under it.

  2. @OP – Donald Trump‘s administration is to allow the remains of endangered elephants legally hunted in two African countries to be imported to the US, reversing a ban introduced by Barack Obama.

    Not only is it reversing Obama legislation, but it is sticking two fingers up to environmental conservation efforts, AND seeking applause from the NRA gun lobby! – Just a matter of basic empty-headed, couldn’t-care-less Trumpism!

    Take a bow President air-head!

  3. From the article above:

    The President’s son, Donald Trump Jr, sparked a wave of condemnation in 2012 when he was pictured holding the severed tail of an African elephant.

    I’m pretty sure this had everything to do with the decision. What will Jr. want to blast to smithereens next month? A cheetah? A tiger? Watch the endangered species list shrink slowly but surely.

  4. I would like to hunt Trumps but I can’t. Damn……And its not like hunting an elephant is hard. How do you miss?
    “Oh look, I think there’s one in the corner”…..where?…… “Next to the Land Rover”,,,,,,,,,,
    I can’t read anything without getting sick nowdays.

  5. Yet more utterly disgusting behaviour from a man who plumbs new lows each time we think he can’t sink into the filth any deeper.

    All Trump wants to do is sign things so he can boast how much he’s achieving. He doesn’t care what’s on the pieces of paper though. Ideally for him they want to be reversing anything Obama did but failing that it doesn’t matter too much. In Trump’s transactional thinking each thing he signs is a little win and if it’s the removal of a protection to stop water pollution or it makes it easier for people to kill elephants then tough because to worry about things like that you need human emotions – empathy, sympathy, compassion – and Trump being a psychopath has none of those.

    When are the people who voted for him and still support him going to realise he doesn’t care about anyone but himself. FFS immediately after the election he actually told his supporters that he didn’t need them anymore, “well maybe I will again in 4 years time..” but otherwise he laid it out exactly as he thinks it. He got what he wanted from them, their votes, by promising them everything they wanted whether he had the slightest intention of actually trying to do that or not and now he didn’t need them anymore.

    This has been Trump’s pattern all his life. That’s why he doesn’t pay contractors and has ended up in four thousand law suits. Once he’s got what he wants, the contractor doing their job, he sees the payment to them as unnecessary because he no longer needs that contractor. Now he’s president so he no longer needs those voters. He kept going to rallies after the election to massage his own ego in their applause but you’ll note the minute the attendance at rallies started to drop off he stopped holding them because now he looks bad if the halls aren’t full. It was never about connecting with his base though. He doesn’t give a shit about any of them. It was always only about himself.

  6. Actually it’s surprising that Trump even has the time to sign papers making it eaasier to kill wildlife. This website shows what he’s been up to every day of his presidency.

    https://factba.se/topic/calendar

    As of now he’s been in office for 301 days and spent a staggering 71 of those (24%) playing golf.

    He’s visited properties he owns even more often, on 88 out of the 301 days (29%)

    The world is basically paying for this human turd to promote his own properties and businesses, make money out of the presidency, go to rallies and play golf. In what little time he has left over his remaining ambitions are to gut everything the nigger before him did because he sure as fuck hates the fact that a black man was ever in the White House, take healthcare away from as many poor people as possible and change the tax system so it benefits himself and his heirs ás much as possible.

  7. Good comment, Arkrid. But it’s not just Trump. The Republicans in the House love the tax plan and they loved the proposed health plan. And they, along with the Republicans in the Senate, approved of all of Trump’s appointees. They are all traitors and hucksters, all turds.

    Most of Trump’s foreign deals are with the most corrupt counties in the word. Azerbaijani, for example, is arguably the most corrupt nation in the world.

  8. @OP – But the US Fish and Wildlife Service, announcing the lifting of the ban in Zimbabwe and Zambia, said money raised through hunting permits could boost conservation efforts.
    “Legal, well-regulated sport hunting as part of a sound management programme can benefit the conservation of certain species
    by providing incentives to local communities to conserve the species and by putting much-needed revenue back into conservation,”
    a {LYING] spokesman said.

    . . . which is of course a statement of Trumpist “ALTERNATIVE FACTS” which have no evidential basis! – but it supports money making by foreign operated hunting lodges, – and entertains big-gun, big-ego, small-brained, rich Americans!

    http://www.tourismupdate.co.za/article/104082/Photo-safaris-trump-trophy-hunting

    In 2009, a study published by the International Union for Conservation of Nature characterised big game trophy hunting in West Africa as using “up a lot of space without generating corresponding socio-economic benefits”, making “insignificant” financial contributions to local populations and national GDPs.

    A more recent briefing paper released by the World Tourism Organisation asserts that “the total international tourism receipts for Africa in 2013 reached $34.2bn” and that the number of international arrivals is predicted to more than double from a record 56 million tourists in 2013 to 134 million a year by 2030.

    The authors note that Africa accounts for about half of the global wildlife watching market, which “has been estimated at 12 million trips annually and is growing at a rate of about 10% a year”. They highlight the fact that “wildlife watching represents 80% of the total annual sales of trips to Africa and sales are increasing”.

    Regional case studies show that in 2005, 176 000 nature tourists spent $194m in Zambia, and in 2009, Tanzania’s popular Serengeti-Ngorongoro Circuit alone generated $500m from wildlife watching visitors.

    The recently released documentary ‘Blood Lions’ estimates the annual revenue generated by a typical African hunting lodge to be $800 000 compared to $2.46m raised by an equivalent photo safari outfit. Operating all year round, the wildlife-watching business trumps the seasonal (6 months of the year) hunting company by serving a significantly larger number of tourists and making a substantially greater contribution to the local economy, for instance through airfares, wages and taxes.

    A 2013 report by the organisation Economists at Large describes the role of trophy hunting in Africa as “tiny” and “completely insignificant” in the context of national economies, accounting for less than 2% of overall tourism revenues and never more than 0.27% of the GDP of the countries surveyed.

  9. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-42035832

    President Donald Trump has suspended the import of elephant hunting trophies, only a day after a ban was relaxed by his administration.

    Imports of trophies from elephants legally hunted in Zambia and Zimbabwe had been set to resume, reversing a 2014 Obama-era ban.

    But late on Friday, President Trump tweeted the change was on hold until he could “review all conservation facts”.

    The move to relax the ban had sparked immediate anger from animal activists.

    “Your shameful actions confirm the rumours that you are unfit for office,” said French actress and animal-rights activist Brigitte Bardot in a letter to President Trump.

    Experts say that populations of African elephants are plummeting.

    Their numbers dropped by about 30% from 2007-14, according to the 2016 Great Elephant Census.

    The non-profit group’s report found a population drop of 6% in Zimbabwe alone.

    Despite their listing under the Endangered Species Act, there is a provision in US law that allows permits to import animal parts if there is sufficient evidence that the fees generated will actually benefit species conservation.

    Of course the evidence, that any “benefit” to conservation, is negligible, or non-existant, is already available (see#12) – but it is written by those Trump-despised “establishment” scientists and economists, who won’t use Trumpy “alternative facts”!

  10. Brigitte Bardot is right. Trump is unfit. What do we do about it? The country is unfit.

    Anger not just from “animal activists.” Anyone with a mind and a heart should be angry reading this:

    “Evidence shows that poaching has increased in areas where trophy hunting is permitted,” said chief executive Wayne Pacelle.

    Why is it legal to kill elephants anywhere?

  11. LaurieB #15
    Nov 18, 2017 at 2:21 pm

    Why is it legal to kill animals for the fun of it anywhere?

    Apart from native hunter-gatherer peoples hunting for food (who hunt from necessity rather than fun), I would suggest it is because mentally inadequate members of influential elites, like to pose as “big shots”, killing powerful animals, so as to show-off their macho caveman skills to followers! – . . .
    and of course to show off skills with weapons, to impress and intimidate the peasants or the colonised locals, that they are keeping subjugated and “in their place”!
    (The classic colonial white-man aristocrat big-game hunter on his day off from ruling “lesser” people)

    The bigger or more dangerous the animal, the bigger the ego boost! – a bit like the jihadist or terrorist, who seeks fame or notoriety, making an impressive mark, by killing a hundred+ from a rival tribe/religion/culture.

  12. Why is it legal to kill animals for the fun of it anywhere?

    Follow up question; why do some people even find it fun to kill an animal? I can live with many other viewpoints. My politics are liberal, but I can still debate with conservatives. I happen to believe that the earth is round and that we humans visited the moon a few decades ago, but if you disagree I’d happily discuss with you over a beer. However if you enjoy killing living creatures then we cannot be friends. To paraphrase Einstein you are immediately to me an object of contempt.

    Killing animals – for protection, for food, – is often necessary, but I just don’t get that any person other than a psychopath could enjoy doing so.

  13. Hi Phil.
    When I was in my teens I had already decided I was no hunter. I am however a fisherman, well I try anyway.
    I have an internal struggle with eating meat lately. Not necessarily for health reasons but for
    humane reasons. I still eat fish and bird but not mammals. I recognize I am a omnivore but that doesn’t help.
    Lately I have been looking at bird intelligence. Now I’m starting to think about them.
    What am I to do? I’m getting hungry!!

  14. Laurie, I’ve made it my goal to not eat out of a box. Preservatives you know.
    I also switched to salads three times a week. I like being lazy and that works for me.
    Which veggie burger do you recommend?

  15. No recommendation on the veggie burgers. I learned to cook from the Mediterranean women. Big families, limited funds and cooking with seasonal produce. The best, healthiest recipes I make come from there. Meat is too expensive so they emphasize soups and stews which are versatile, healthy and can feed many people at one meal. These are hearty and filling and you won’t miss the meat.

    I think that every country all around the Mediterranean has it’s own version of fish soup/stew. The North African version is exotic and spicy with big chunks of fish in it and chick peas, cilantro, potatoes, strong olive oil and if you can handle the carbs, go for some hearty garlic bread for dipping. It’s sublime. Forget about the veggie burgers.

    Look up Tunisian fish stew. One of their best dishes.

  16. alf1200 #21
    Nov 22, 2017 at 10:42 pm

    I also switched to salads three times a week.

    We have salads once or twice a week, – with our own home grown lettuce, tomatoes, and (now frozen) cooked beetroot, still hanging on under cover at the end of the season. – But I do like cooked meats!

  17. We also have salad for main course meals. Just the other night I cooked up some chicken fajita mix – small pieces of chicken, chunks of red and green peppers, spices are cumin and oregano, olive oil, lemon juice, fried at high heat. Then arrange salad on plate with fajita mix in middle of it. Some sour cream and/or grated cheese and it’s a main course meal that is filling, healthy, inexpensive, and involves minimal amounts of meat.

    Another excellent version of the salad main course is the French style “plat varie’ ” (sp. ?) This one is a plate of greens, lightly cooked vegetables, (carrots, green beans, etc) hard boiled eggs and can have a dollop of tuna or rice or potatoes, etc. It’s basically whatever you have on hand and arranged together on the plate with no meat or minimal meat and then a nice dressing on top.

  18. I tried eating salad regularly, as I love animals and want to be healthy. Hated it. They have these salad places all over Manhattan; it’s the new thing. They suck. They give you a big bowl of salad with some other stuff of your choice mixed in, like beans or whatever. It tastes horrible and an hour later I’m hungry.

    Salad and vegetables are, in my opinion, not adequate, unless you’re a hamster or a rabbit. Spend more and buy grass fed meat. More humane (presumably) and healthier.

    I need meat. I don’t know what else to do when I buy food. I can’t not eat meat without feeling disatisfied. I eat fruits and vegetables, but they don’t fill me up.

  19. Dan

    I don’t know what else to do when I buy food.

    I totally get that, Dan. I feel the same way, especially because I’m not a good cook and I don’t enjoy trying to be one. My competency is limited. But then, a few years ago I had a client who was an immigrant from India. She would be in the kitchen cooking up fantastic food with her daughters and I’d check it out from time to time and I was very impressed. It was all meatless dishes. She asked me why I eat meat at all if I liked the look of their dishes. I said that it’s not about wanting to eat meat necessarily. The problem is that I’d need to completely retrain myself and acquire a whole new repertoire of cooking skills and recipes. This is not impossible of course but in that moment she and I stood there contemplating everything that it entails to retrain from scratch.

    With all of our young people officially launched now, I’m in the process of renovating our personal menu. No more massive carb meals. No more huge steaks on the grill. Massive slabs of meat on the grill – ridiculous. Time to lighten up the food situation here.

    There are some food items that vegetarians utilize regularly because they have the effect of being meat-like. Example: huge portobello mushrooms sliced thick and saute’d with butter and olive oil, s&p and white wine. very filling and satisfying. Other things out there too. I’m not a vegetarian although I feel substantial guilt over it. Moving toward less meat is something I can definitely do without pain and suffering. Written on a day in America where millions of turkeys are slaughtered and consumed by a bunch of apes for no good reason whatsoever.

  20. I’m absolutely loving learning/inventing new recipes. Its a major leisure activity. Mainly they’re vegan

    Both my kids love food and cooking, a combination of good restaurants, a very young Jamie Oliver making cooking cool and their mother, a quite superb cook spoiling their palates for ordinary food . I’ve had to up my game.

    My daughter is vegan and teaching me lots. She loved meat and still does. She completely accepts its the sheer superb combination of taste, umami, and mouth feel that makes it most difficult to give up. When six her first question about some cute ducks on a pond, when walking in the countryside was “What do they taste like?” But now having accepted that to call ourselves moral, we must ever enlarge the Franchise of the Suffering until the job is done. For her there is no shying away from the scrummyness of meat and to persuade all away from it you do have to compete with it head on.

    We’ve been through any number of recipes for burgers with various manufacturing processes. She’s working with Jackfruit. I’m refining the barley burger and using a Japanese soya, garlic and ginger powder which is actually quite neutral but jam packed with umami. Getting the long range cohesive forces right is a bit of a struggle. The taste is spot on, the crust and caramelising just great. Its firm but needs to take more to bite it apart. I think the long Jackfuit fibres will be excellent. Next week we’ll be putting them together.

  21. I always thought that I hated vegetarian cooking – turns out I just didn’t know how to cook. Thing is, with a nice steak you don’t have to do anything to make it taste great, just throw it on the grill and that’s it. With a veggie diet (or vegan as we mostly are) you have to work at it. Our (English) cuisine is generally lacking in spices so one of the first steps is to learn how to cook with spice – when to use turmeric, cumin, curry powder. Lots and lots of garlic. I was a confirmed meat and potatoes type until I met my wife. She taught me how to make all sorts of dishes using such appetizing ingredients as chickpeas, lentils and so on. And they taste amazing. This has been one of the biggest awakenings in my life – a healthy diet can absolutely taste great, and you won’t miss meat at all.

  22. Dan #25
    Nov 23, 2017 at 2:52 pm

    I tried eating salad regularly, as I love animals and want to be healthy. Hated it. They have these salad places all over Manhattan; it’s the new thing.

    Perhaps you would like to try one of my salads!

    They suck. They give you a big bowl of salad with some other stuff of your choice mixed in, like beans or whatever. It tastes horrible and an hour later I’m hungry.

    I am not a fan of the type of salad which is a big bowl of greens smothered in olive oil!

    Salad and vegetables are, in my opinion, not adequate, unless you’re a hamster or a rabbit.

    They certainly aren’t a meal on their own.

    For those averse to meat as well as hunting, there are veggi options.

    First I take some of my (home grown) individually sliced, frozen beetroot from the freezer about 2 hours before the meal, and leave it to thaw.

    You can use pickled beet from jars if you prefer it.

    I then put one egg per person on to boil for about 5 minutes.

    Then I arrange 3 large, or 4 or 5 small leaves, of iceberg lettuce, on each plate.

    Next I arrange 3, 4, or 5, slices of cooked ham, chicken, salami, or a mixture, on the other half of the plate. (Those averse to real meat, can use “Quorn” vegetarian meat made from mushrooms)

    I then place 7 or 8 slices of cucumber along the side of the plate, and add two medium tomatoes or a handful of cherry tomatoes.

    Three or four thawed slices of beetroot go in the centre of each plate.

    When the eggs are hard boiled, I rinse them in cold water to help the shells come off cleanly, slice the eggs, and spread them on top of the meat between the cucumber and the lettuce.

    I then add two teaspoons of coleslaw or cottage cheese, on top of the lettuce, and scatter on a few raisins (or peas fresh from the pod), and a small portion of diced cheddar cheese or prawns. Sometimes a little fresh shredded raw carrot is added instead of coleslaw.

    Sometimes we also have a few leaves of fresh chives available from the garden, – with salad cream also optional.

    Not all these ingredients need to go on every salad.

    This is served with a microwave-defrosted, warm buttered bread bun from the freezer, or with an oven heated Indian Nan-Bread, on a side-plate.

    I am fairly sure you will find this more filling, nutritious, and appetising, than the salad you describe @#25.

  23. Nice comments/suggestions. Especially Laurie’s. Thanks. I too feel substantial guilt. But I deal with that by engaging in willful denial. If I were to research the subject of the food industry, had the courage to do that, I would, I am sure, become a vegetarian and a full-time or serious animal rights activist. Maybe that’ll happen. By the way, my mother (the eternal realist and presenter of reality), upset everyone tonight. As we were all happily eating turkey she informed us that in some places the turkeys are so miserable, are packed so tightly, they can’t move; and they’re so undernourished they peck each other and try to eat each other. “Mom!”, my sister said, “do we have to hear this now?”

    Man! Infernal Man! We make a hell on earth for other creatures.

    Dostoyevsky once said something like: “the degree of society can be determined by entering its prisons.”

    Someone else (forgot who) said: the degree of society can be judged by how its animals are treated.

    We’re in bad shape. The whole world, as a society, is in bad shape, I would say.

  24. Wow, Did I bring all this guilt on? Now I feel guilty. Anyway Dan, I started out with a little ham in my salad, they I changed it to chicken. And I can’t feel guilty about milk or cheese. Or croutons.
    I’ll sneak up on using tuna instead of chicken some day. But sixty years of habit don’t die easy. And I’m not a good cook.

  25. Arkrid

    Eat less meat! Move toward none at all. Face the consequences of our actions. Consciousness raising about animal rights. Burgers and fajitas are bad enough but massacre of elephants and lions for the fun of it is an atrocity.

  26. LaurieB #34
    Nov 24, 2017 at 9:09 am

    Eat less meat! Move toward none at all.
    Face the consequences of our actions.
    Consciousness raising about animal rights.

    I have always thought of this as questionable!

    To my way of thinking, there is little difference between hunting an animal, and destroying its jungle habitat to plant (oil palm? corn?) monocultures, and leaving it to starve! – not to mention shooting or spraying animal “pests” which eat “our” crops on “our” land!

    Then there is the issue of what we define as an “animal” for food-production purposes!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-42101700

    A Finnish bakery is to offer bread made from crushed crickets in a move that is hoped will help tackle world hunger.

    Fazer Bakery in Finland said the product, available in its stores from Friday, was the first of its kind.

    Each loaf produced will contain about 70 crickets that have been dried and ground, and then mixed with flour, wheat and other seeds.

    In 2013, the United Nations estimated that at least 2 billion people eat insects worldwide.

    According to the UN, more than 1,900 species of insect are used for food.

    The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) began a programme in 2013 to encourage the breeding and consumption of insects.

  27. Alan

    Yes. There are varying degrees of badness in animal rights. Adorable farm animals and the pets in our homes are obviously sentient, intelligent, emotional beings. Insects – not so much. You will be hard pressed to maintain a social movement to protect insects, me thinks. I can actually imagine E. O. Wilson leading the charge effectively though!

    Just personally, I’d rather have no bread than cricket bread.

  28. Adorable farm animals and the pets in our homes are obviously sentient, intelligent, emotional beings. Insects – not so much.

    Insects not so much? That’s just plain bias and smacks of speciesism, Laurie! Shame on you. (Kidding)

    On a serious note, I always rescue spiders when I see them on the road. I push them to the other side so they won’t get run over. I feel compassion for insects too. They’re just living their lives – like us. I did get an exterminator last month. Felt no compunction. Bias against roaches? Perhaps. We all have our prejudices.

    I do eat meat; my position is: at least be aware of what you’re doing and of the suffering involved, rather than just doing it out of habit and without any reflection. learn about what is involved, and try to cut down. Nothing in itself wrong with humans eating meat, is there? Animals eat each other. But mass consumption is very problematic and the industry’s practices are to be despised. I think maybe killing pigs and cows and sheep and other peaceful, smart (and highly cute), animals should be outlawed. I just haven’t made up my mind yet. Maybe because I haven’t had the courage yet to really expose myself to the reality of learning about what really goes on. Willful denial, as I said. I love pigs! (But enough to stop eating them? – That is the question.)

  29. Dan #38
    Nov 24, 2017 at 2:10 pm

    On a serious note, I always rescue spiders when I see them on the road. I push them to the other side so they won’t get run over. I feel compassion for insects too.

    I used to encourage spiders to live in my glasshouses to kill off flies which would cross pollinate plants where I wanted a pure strain.

    If as spiders grow, two spiders’ webs meet at the edges, one spider will eat the other one and take over its web!
    Also many female spiders eat their mates after breeding!

    https://www.livescience.com/7555-creepy-cannibalism-female-spiders-eat-mates.html

    Nature is “red in tooth and claw”, and most of it does not share the sentiments of humans who are isolated from its lethal competition!

  30. Alan

    insects are crustaceans.

    Oh. Hmm. Interesting. Lobster – I can live very well without. This statement is proof of treachery to my fellow native New Englanders of course. For all the work it takes to get at the meat I can’t even say it’s worth the effort. Shrimp – I would be sad to cease consumption of those stupid little bastards. They’re delicious in a seafood pasta. Must I give them up? Have true vegetarians with their admirable high ethical standards given up shrimp? Sigh. Well alright then. A rational logical consistency is my goal. (pie in the sky)

  31. Dan

    I feel compassion for insects too. They’re just living their lives – like us. I did get an exterminator last month.

    ~snickers~ So much for consistency then.

    Bias against roaches?

    I don’t care if you perpetrated a massacre upon the roaches of this world. I can’t forgive roaches for the anguish they caused me back in my days of University struggling student. My dismal apartment was overrun with the despicable creatures to the point that in the middle of the night they’d climb along the top of the headboard of my bed and fall down on my head waking me up with a shriek of disgust and crying. (me, not them!) I never got over it. I should’ve dropped a DDT bomb on that place. No guilt.

  32. Alan

    From your link:

    Wilder and Rypstra found that among the wolf spider (Hogna helluo), large males were never eaten by their mates, while small males were consumed 80 percent of the time.

    If so, then how are there small males at all? Big guy wins the mating game and produces big sons. etc.

    Those little guys are winning somehow.

  33. LaurieB #42
    Nov 24, 2017 at 3:27 pm

    If so, then how are there small males at all?
    Big guy wins the mating game and produces big sons. etc.

    Those little guys are winning somehow.

    In some species, males are naturally smaller!
    In others the small males are just undernourished or not fully grown.

  34. Naturally smaller???

    If I said that human males are just naturally bigger you’d never let me get away with that !!

    Come on Alan!!!

    (you said that to me once)

  35. LaurieB #40
    Nov 24, 2017 at 3:02 pm

    Shrimp – I would be sad to cease consumption of those stupid little bastards.
    They’re delicious in a seafood pasta. Must I give them up?

    Ah well! There you have it! – an adventurous opportunity to branch out!

    http://www.bugsfeed.com/locust

    In 2004 two Australian government workers, trying to deal with a huge locust swarm which was devastating crops across New South Wales, started encouraging residents to take advantage of the abundance of free protein and nutrients that the swarm offered.

    They called the locusts ‘sky prawn’ and even produced a recipe book of the same name, thinking it sounded more appealing.
    It wasn’t their word; similar terms have been used in insect-eating countries around the world for centuries.
    It’s just that ‘western’ countries are only now catching up on the practice of entomophagy, so currently treat it like some unheard-of and intriguing mystery.

    ‘Sky prawn’ isn’t wildly inaccurate either – locusts are just grasshoppers in a breeding frenzy, and insects like these are arthropods just like their cousins, the crustaceans (shrimp, prawn, lobster and so on).
    Hence the reports of various insects tasting of ‘sweet shrimp’, ‘nutty crab meat’, and so on.

  36. LaurieB #44
    Nov 24, 2017 at 4:31 pm

    Naturally smaller???

    https://www.livescience.com/9995-size-matters-spiders-smaller-males-advantages.html

    Male spiders can be tens of times smaller and weigh one hundredth of what their female counterparts weigh, and new research shows that these size differences may be in part due to a spider behavior called bridging.

    Bridging is a means of transportation for spiders living in the trees and other vegetation of forests and meadows. In bridging, a spider casts a strand of its silk into the wind, and the silk is carried aloft to a neighboring plant. The spider then pulls the strand taut and crawls upside-down along the strand to its new turf, where it may find a willing mate or tasty prey.

    @#42 – Those little guys are winning somehow.

    Yep! See the link above on “Bridging”.
    Small spiders can also run out a strand of silk and go paragliding on the wind! In the world of spiders and spiderlings, – small is mobile!

  37. alf1200 #4
    Nov 17, 2017 at 5:21 pm

    I would like to hunt Trumps but I can’t. Damn

    (I see my earlier reply to this comment is one of the ones lost when the site was hacked, so I will put it back.)

    There is a senate investigation committee hunting Trumps, but I think they will cage them rather than shoot them! 🙂

  38. Bridging. Ok, that’s interesting.

    From your link:

    The new idea — that bridging behavior has played a key role in driving males of some species toward smaller sizes — can explain why, in some species, males and females are vastly different sizes while in others they are nearly the same.

    Spiders that live on the ground don’t need to make bridges. And among those that live high up in tree tops, some are prevented from making bridges by other aspects of their anatomy, such as their body shape or the weakness of their silk. For those species, males and females tend be similarly-sized.

    “Our prediction is that no same-sized species use bridging,” Moya-Larano said, and future work may show that this prediction holds up.

    Hmm. Thinking about these conclusions. I would have thought that those high tree top spiders would need bridging the most. What if we find out that the high tree top, similar sized m/f spiders – the females are just less murderous in general?

    From Wiki

    Non-reproductive cannibalism[edit]
    Some spiders, such as Pholcus phalangioides, will prey on their own kind when food is scarce. Also, females of Phidippus johnsoni have been observed carrying dead males in their fangs. This behavior may be triggered by aggression, where females carry over hostility from their juvenile state and consume males just as they would prey. Sih and Johnson surmise that non-reproductive cannibalism can occur due to a remnant of an aggression trait in juvenile females. Known as the “aggressive spillover hypothesis”, this tendency unselectively to attack anything that moves is cultivated by a positive correlation between hostility, foraging capability, and fecundity. Aggression at a young age leads to an increase in prey consumption and as such, a larger adult size. This behavior “spills over” into adulthood, and shows up as a nonadaptive trait that manifests itself through adult females preying on males of their same species.[5]

    Those large females sitting on those delicate webs, monitoring vibrations waiting for a meal are surrounded by tiny males each waiting for an opportunity to mate. A relatively hefty male ventures out onto the web, inevitably creates vibrations and is instantly munched to death by hungry her. And why not? Those guys are a dime a dozen. Plenty more where he came from! Maybe a few more try as well. Maybe the big guys just can’t get close enough for a try at her. Big clodhoppers, the bouncing oafs. Such easy marks for a hungry aggressive big female. Then a tiny little guy, sliding along quietly, with undetectable vibrations gets right up next to her and does the deed! Result: more little guy sons and himself maybe munched to death but with a smile on his spidery face.

  39. I will repost my witty comment, lost in the recent whatever-it-was. (Was it really a hack?)

    “I am opposed to putting Trumps in cages. They need ample space to roam. We need to be protected from them but we can do that in a humane way. The old-style zoo is outdated and an inhumane institution.”

    Laurie, I have a friend who is a professional fisherman. He knows all about it. The fishing industry is horrendous! They kill tons of fish just for a few sardines. Carnage is what it is. And I once saw part of a documentary about the lobster business. Awful.

    My late father was right. After he saw the documentary Food inc. (I think that’s the title) he said: “if you see that film you won’t want to eat anything!” That’s why I haven’t seen it. Willful denial.

  40. Dan #50
    Nov 24, 2017 at 6:15 pm

    “I am opposed to putting Trumps in cages.
    They need ample space to roam.
    We need to be protected from them but we can do that in a humane way.

    It is obvious that Trumps belong on some other planet at a safe distance from other humans and Earth’s environment!
    We just missed a golden opportunity to establish a high-tech “Trump Central Palace” package holiday on some new territory, and give them all the space in the galaxy in which to roam! 🙂

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-42053634

    Astronomers have been scrambling to observe the unique space rock, known as ‘Oumuamua, before it fades from view.

    Although ‘Oumuamua formed around another star, scientists think it could have been wandering through the Milky Way, unattached to any star system, for hundreds of millions of years before its chance [passing fly-by] encounter with our Solar System.

  41. Alan

    It is obvious that Trumps belong on some other planet at a safe distance from other humans and Earth’s environment!
    We just missed a golden opportunity to establish a high-tech “Trump Central Palace” package holiday on some new territory, and give them all the space in the galaxy in which to roam! 🙂

    This plan is doomed to circle around and stab us in the back. With the Trumps firmly ensconced in deep space, along comes a Galaxy class star ship. The crew attempts to engage with the inhabitants in a good faith diplomatic relationship and quickly comes to realize that not a single sentence uttered by the natives was truthful. On return to the Galaxy class star ship the crew comes to find out that every single metallic object has been stripped from the ship, melted down and remolded to form gigantic letters spelling TRUMP, which the natives were then attempting to attach to the top of the starship. This is hopeless. Refit the ship and get us out of here. Warp 10. Engage!

  42. How about another one I’ve been thinking of; Don Jr. heading on out with a cargo of big guns and an entourage of lackeys with the goal of annihilation of a large number of African wildlife – endangered species of course. On his first morning stepping out of the luxury outhouse, he stretches and takes a deep cleansing breath and is promptly stomped on by a massive bull elephant squishing him into a thin Trumpy pancake. Fade out to a gorgeous panoramic view with sun rising over the savannah. Justice. African style.

  43. A fitting conclusion to reality TV’s Trump would be to revive the one way Big Brother trip to Mars. And all his entourage in charge of a whole planet. And at the inevitable end of days we could see if Pence was raptured.

  44. phil rimmer #56
    Nov 25, 2017 at 3:08 pm

    A fitting conclusion to reality TV’s Trump would be to revive the one way Big Brother trip to Mars. And all his entourage in charge of a whole planet.

    You realise that when his enterprises are a bankrupt shambles, he is likely to arrange some enormous con, so some gullibles bring about a triumphal comeback at their own expense, to “honour HIS expertise”!

    http://uk.businessinsider.com/r-art-of-the-spin-trump-bankers-question-his-portrayal-of-financial-comeback-2016-7

    Donald Trump portrays his comeback from near bankruptcy as proof of his business acumen — but bankers who worked on the negotiations have a different recollection

    NEW YORK (Reuters) – Donald Trump, who often says he only likes winners, tells one grand tale of loss: In 1990, he nearly went bankrupt and was forced to ask dozens of banks to whom he owed money to change the terms on their loans and forgive some of his debts.

    It was, the real estate developer admits in his 1997 book “The Art of the Comeback,” the darkest period of his professional life. In his telling, it’s a story of redemption, of resilience, and proof of his exceptional negotiating skills and shrewd thinking.

    The six bankers and lawyers involved in the talks say the bailout wasn’t based on any overture Trump initiated with the banks – and the terms of the deal were dictated by what was best for the banks, not Trump.

    Three of the participants say Trump didn’t acknowledge he had a problem until his lenders reviewed his books, realized he was on the brink of collapse, and summoned him for debt restructuring talks.

    I think my proposed asteroid ride exiting the solar-System, is much safer for planet Earth!

    After all – there are also invaluable learning opportunities as well!

    The rock has no native water – so if he pollutes the recyclable supply he is given .. . . . . . .

  45. @OP – Donald Trump lifts ban on importing elephant hunt trophies from Zimbabwe and Zambia

    . . . and having grabbed media attention, shuffles in the face of the outcry!

    Meanwhile back in the world of researched information!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-42152393

    Trophy hunting removes ‘good genes’ and raises extinction risk

    Hunting animals that stand out from the crowd because of their impressive horns or lustrous manes could lead to extinction, according to a study.

    Research predicts that removing even 5% of high-quality males risks wiping out the entire population, for species under stress in a changing world.

    Animals prized by trophy hunters for their horns, antlers or tusks usually have the best genes, say UK scientists.

    Removing these could push a species over the edge, they warn.

    There is intense global debate over trophy hunting. Some argue that it should be banned or restricted, while others say it can provide valuable revenue for conservation.

    Dr Rob Knell of Queen Mary, University of London, who led the research, said the assumption that so-called selective harvesting is not especially threatening to a population of animals does not take into account recent work.

    ”Because these high-quality males with large secondary sexual traits tend to father a high proportion of the offspring, their ‘good genes’ can spread rapidly, so populations of strongly sexually selected animals can adapt quickly to new environments,” he said.

    ”Removing these males reverses this effect and could have serious and unintended consequences.”

    Human hunting is different from natural predation in that big-game trophy hunters target large animals, usually males.

    They may be awarded prizes for killing animals with exceptionally large antlers, horns or manes.

    And illegal poaching of animals such as elephants for the ivory trade also targets animals with the biggest tusks.

  46. Alan, One problem I have with hunting. The best and biggest are taken, instead of the old and weak, as in nature.
    This effect is also noticed in fish stocks.

  47. Alf1200,

    I’ve been busy at work of late so I’ve missed posting and doing anything other than a quick browse of the site. Just want to say how much I’ve appreciated your humor on this tread, much needed after a significant amount of wine consumed marking and stealing the odd minute here and there. I’ve missed the site and you’ve helped lift me out of my marking funk. Ta very much.

  48. “Alan, One problem I have with hunting. The best and biggest are taken, instead of the old and weak, as in nature.
    This effect is also noticed in fish stocks.”

    The big problem in Australia is the destruction of the mangroves for housing developments.

Leave a Reply