Florida Scientists Are Running Around at Night Bashing in Iguanas’ Skulls

4

By Rafi Letzter

A team of scientists in Florida are on a three-month, $63,000 iguana-bashing spree.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission contracted the 15-member crew from the University of Florida to develop a set of best practices for killing the big lizards, according to a March 9 report in the Sun-Sentinel. So far, bashing their heads in seems to be a winning method.

Well-equipped team members sometimes use a captive bolt gun to destroy the critters’ brains. (Picture a mobile version of the device often used to kill cows in slaughterhouses.) But, the Sun-Sentinel reported, bashing their heads against the sides of solid objects, like trucks or boats, works just as well.

Given that the team is hoping their results will offer practical advice to homeowners, cracking some lizard skull against whatever hard object is handy might be a bit more practical than methods requiring bolt guns.

Continue reading by clicking the name of the source below.

4 COMMENTS

  1. @OP – A team of scientists in Florida are on a three-month, $63,000 iguana-bashing spree.

    This is a predictable consequence of reckless people introducing invasive species into ecosystems where they do not belong!

    They also urgently need some method of “bashing Lionfish” in the Caribbean, and killing off Japanese Knotweed in most parts of the world outside of Japan!

  2. Alan, How about introducing a new predator species to eat the iguanas?
    Like Asian tigers or even better, baboons?
    Or we could send our US rednecks with their AR 15’s?

  3. alf1200 #2
    Mar 16, 2018 at 6:40 pm

    Alan, How about introducing a new predator species to eat the iguanas?
    Like Asian tigers? Haha…………..

    Nah! They are rare and endangered!

    Better use a plentiful local species! – Catholics – and fashionista chefs!!

    What’s more, by papal decree long ago, the cold-blooded iguana, fond of warm coastal waters, can be eaten on Friday and during Lent.

    Especially if more cold weather makes the Iguanas easy to catch!

    These days, a cold snap in Miami means a night when it rains iguanas. Down from sea grapes and buttonwood trees large, green, tree-dwelling invaders fall––because they’re native to warmer, more equatorial Central and South America.
    And there the lizards lie until the sun warms them up enough to move. It’s called “brumation,” the reptilian form of mammalian hibernation.

    Dogs also make good iguana predators!

  4. Alan, Ask an Canadian about (aboot) “drop bears”
    And if you never had a frozen iguana popsicle, well you haven’t lived.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.