Government vs. God? People are less religious when government is bigger, research says

Apr 24, 2018

By Jared Gilmour

Researchers call it an exchange model of religion: If people can get what they need from the government (be it health care, education or welfare) they’re less likely to turn to a divine power for help, according to the theory.

But are people actually more likely to drop religion in places where governments provide more services and stability? In a new paper, psychology researchers crunched the numbers — and found that better government services were in fact linked to lower levels of strong religious beliefs.

Those findings held true in states across the U.S. and in countries around the world, researchers said.

The article, “Religion as an Exchange System: The Interchangeability of God and Government in a Provider Role,” was published April 12 in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

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2 comments on “Government vs. God? People are less religious when government is bigger, research says

  • @OP – Government vs. God?
    People are less religious when government is bigger, research says

    Or – put another way – government services are smaller and less effective when small-minded people are conned into thinking gods will do it for them, and look after their needs!

    (Address fear, poverty and deprivation, with more dogma and more prayer!)

    Naturally rich elites conspire with well heeled self-important enrobed theocrats, to share out the communities’ wealth among themselves – while perpetuating and encouraging such thinking!

    With sheeple mind-slaves and a military budget to support repression of the wider population, minimal public services will do for the working citizens! – as can be seen in numerous right-wing and religious or ideological dictatorships!
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  • The late great Isaac Asimov once said that he would rather have a nameless bureaucrat 3000 kilometers away deciding what services he gets than the person down the street, because you would likely have to follow that person’s religious beliefs
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