Supreme Court won’t take up challenge to restrictive Arkansas abortion law

May 30, 2018

By Robert Barnes

The Supreme Court on Tuesday turned down a challenge to a restrictive Arkansas law that for now will end the use of medication abortions in the state and could close two of the state’s three abortion clinics.

The law requires doctors who provide medication abortions to have a contract with a second doctor who has hospital admitting privileges. Arkansas contends there can be complications with the procedure, while abortion rights advocates say the law’s objective is to make it more difficult for women to access the two-pill regimen that is used in the first nine weeks of pregnancy.

While Planned Parenthood said it would immediately notify patients that it can no longer offer the procedure in the state, the case is expected to return to a lower court, perhaps for a trial on the law’s benefits and burdens.

“Arkansas is now shamefully responsible for being the first state to ban medication abortion,” Dawn Laguens, executive vice president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America said in a statement.

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One comment on “Supreme Court won’t take up challenge to restrictive Arkansas abortion law”

  • @OP – “Arkansas is now shamefully responsible for being the first state to ban medication abortion,” Dawn Laguens, executive vice president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America said in a statement.

    Naturally the bigoted stupid, would obstruct the simplest, safest, and most conveniently effective, method of abortion!

    https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007382.htm

    A medical, or nonsurgical, abortion can be done within 7 weeks from the first day of the woman’s last period. A combination of prescription hormone medicines is used to help the body remove the fetus and placenta tissue. Your health care provider may give you the medicines after doing a physical exam and asking questions about your medical history.

    Medicines used include mifepristone, methotrexate, misoprostol, prostaglandins, or a combination of these medicines. Your provider will prescribe the medicine, and you will take it at home.

    After you take the medicine, your body will expel the pregnancy tissue. Most women have moderate to heavy bleeding and cramping for several hours. Your provider may prescribe medicine for pain and nausea if needed to ease your discomfort during this process.



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