No, You Probably Shouldn’t Follow Kelly Clarkson’s ‘Lectin-Free’ Diet

Jun 26, 2018

By Bahar Gholipour

In a recent interview with NBC’s Today show, singer Kelly Clarkson said her 37-lb. (17 kilograms) weight loss was a happy side effect of a diet she followed primarily to overcome her thyroid problem.

“I literally read this book, and I did it for this autoimmune disease that I had, and I had a thyroid issue,” Clarkson said. “I’m not on medicine anymore because of this book.” And along the way, she also lost weight, she said.

Clarkson was referring to the book “The Plant Paradox” (Harper Wave, 2017) by Dr. Steven Gundry, which was published last year and was followed by a cookbook this April.

The book comes with a big, controversial claim: Gundry says a broad group of plant proteins called lectins — found in grains; beans and legumes; nuts; fruits; nightshade vegetables such as eggplant, tomatoes and potatoes; and dairy — are the root of modern illnesses, ranging from obesity and gastrointestinal issues to autoimmune disorders and allergies. Lectins, according to Gundry, bind to sugar molecules in cells throughout the body, altering their function.

Continue reading by clicking the name of the source below.

2 comments on “No, You Probably Shouldn’t Follow Kelly Clarkson’s ‘Lectin-Free’ Diet

  • What a tour de force by the three people with scientific credentials in diet and bio chemistry! Eckel, Cucuzza and Jenkins, not to mention the journalist Bahar Gholipour, give an object lesson on why expertise is imperative in scientific research. With ease and precision they punched holes in Gundry’s assertions, whilst not dismissing them out of hand. Maybe there is something in his claims, although it seems highly possible to me that they are on the right track in asserting that the gains observed in the small number of patients, could be the result of dietary changes not directly associated with the so-called Plant Paradox.

    Gundry is/was a heart specialist, not trained in dietary research, and by the report of the way his findings were presented, without an understanding of what procedures must be followed before such broad claims can be presented to the public as fact.

    Quack diets, alternative, holistic, ‘medical’ literature and ‘medicines’, along with the accompanying cook and lifestyle books are mega business, rivalling genuine medicine in their monetary value, and often owned by the same corporations. I’m sure that Dr Gundry will enjoy his new-found fame, and all being well, fortune. The problem is that as a result of Kelly Clarkson’s endorsement , millions of gullible and presumably sick, vulnerable people are likely to be led up an expensive blind alley.



    Report abuse

  • In a recent interview with NBC’s Today show, singer Kelly Clarkson said her 37-lb. (17 kilograms) weight loss was a happy side effect of a diet she followed primarily to overcome her thyroid problem.

    The depth and time spent on the research behind this, is underwhelming! (0.45 seconds) – To bring up this link!

    https://www.google.com/search?q=how+thyroid+affects+weight&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b
    An unexplained change in weight is one of the most common signs of a thyroid disorder.
    Weight gain may signal low levels of thyroid hormones, a condition called hypothyroidism.
    In contrast, if the thyroid produces more hormones than the body needs, you may lose weight unexpectedly. … Hypothyroidism is far more common.



    Report abuse

Leave a Reply

View our comment policy.