Millennial Evangelicals Diverge From Their Parents’ Beliefs

Aug 29, 2018

By Eliza Griswold

On a muggy evening earlier this summer, a hundred and fifty sticky worshippers poured out of the Clef Club, in Center City, Philadelphia. On Sunday nights, the jazz club hosts the Block Church, a group of young evangelicals who planted thriving congregations in Philadelphia, in 2014, and Mesquite, Texas, in 2017. Worship involves a lot of high-energy hopping around while Christian rockers shred onstage. “There’s no wall you won’t kick down, lie you won’t tear down!” the Block worship team sang before a congregation clad in black T-shirts with white crosses, Vans, and jeans ripped out at the knees.

After the service, the earnest crowd filled a block of South Broad Street, chatting about the beginning of the Book of James, the subject of that evening’s sermon, which Pastor Joey Furjanic, who was on vacation, had delivered by recorded video. James, he’d preached, had been speaking to a scattered church, early followers of Jesus who’d left Jerusalem and were wandering around the ancient world as “immigrants and refugees.” James was telling young Christians how to put their faith into action, which the Block Church attendees were discussing. Across the street, two firefighters, occupying lawn chairs outside a firehouse, looked on at the unusually effervescent and sober group. Although such images of hipster Christians have grown familiar, the spirit among them reflected something new.

At the Block Church, black, white, and Latino evangelicals were worshipping together, which is still a rare sight. During the past decade, evangelicalism has grown more diverse: as the number of white believers has declined, the Latino evangelical population has increased dramatically.

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9 comments on “Millennial Evangelicals Diverge From Their Parents’ Beliefs

  • Millennial Evangelicals Diverge From Their Parents’ Beliefs

    “Diverge” may be a bit optimistic:

    …“I’m going to vote for whoever aligns with scripture,” Kassy Mayer, who graduated from Liberty University in May, majoring in women’s leadership, told me…



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  • Cantaz #1
    Sep 3, 2018 at 3:14 pm

    …“I’m going to vote for whoever aligns with scripture,”

    Delusional sheep, often fancy themselves as “leaders” – when they are in-line, jumping over the shadows their parents and indoctrinators had told them were material objects!

    Kassy Mayer, who graduated from Liberty University in May, majoring in women’s leadership, told me…

    She seems to have been on a pseudo-education course – teaching the biblically blinded blind, to lead the blind! – But was probably pushed into attending that repressive indoctrination centre by equally blinkered parents, who demanded fundamentalist control of the minds of their student children!



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  • Alan #2

    “She seems to have been on a pseudo-education course…”

    Pseudo-education indeed!

    The New Yorker piece features interviews with other people (including a “Professor”) from Liberty “University”: I am sick and tired of religious schools being allowed to usurp the “University” title (and the aura of respectability that comes with it) for their financial gains and indoctrination agendas.

    As Bill Maher once put it (I paraphrase): “I think that a diploma from Liberty belittles my diploma, which I got from a real university!”



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  • Kassy Mayer ought to read her Bible then she’ll understand what Jesus really wants her to do.

    1 Corinthians 14:33-35 for God is not a God of confusion but of peace, as in all the churches of the saints. 34 Let the women keep silent in the churches; for they are not permitted to speak, but let them subject themselves, just as the Law also says. 35 And if they desire to learn anything, let them ask their own husbands at home; for it is improper for a woman to speak in church.

    1 Timothy 5:10 having a reputation for good works; and if she has brought up children, if she has shown hospitality to strangers, if she has washed the saints’ feet, if she has assisted those in distress, and if she has devoted herself to every good work.

    These are the first two quotes I found in a quick search. If I really took the time to copy and paste all of the misogynistic crap in the Bible it would crash this website.

    Jesus could have solved the whole gender/sex discrimination problem with a snap of his holy fingers, but no, he never cared to change one single thing for us. Seems like he was fine with the virgin/whore dichotomy.

    Why do these women (and for that matter, gays, trans, and every other minority) want to belong to an organization that treats them like dirt? And on top of that, to aspire to leadership positions in a group that has been behind the worst oppression we’ve experienced?! Do they think they’ll fix this stuff once they get a little power? Do they need to infiltrate the highest levels and then they’ll excise the rape, servitude and reproductive coercion?!

    No Kassy! You’re now part of the problem. You’re in compliance! You’re a gender traitor! You’re a sheep leading the flock straight to the slaughterhouse!



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  • LaurieB #4
    Sep 3, 2018 at 6:22 pm

    Kassy Mayer ought to read her Bible then she’ll understand what Jesus really wants her to do.

    . . . Or at least what the biblical fairytale Jesus wants her to do.

    Unlike the pseudo-education of Liberty “University”, in the UK there are some documentary sources on public television, of actual education on “The Bible” and the “Historical Jesus”!

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8684466/

    Television presenter Jamie Theakston continues his exploration of historical mysteries by asking if there is any historical evidence for the existence of Jesus and the events relating to him depicted in the Bible.



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  • Alan

    Jamie Theakston continues his exploration

    I wonder if Jamie presents a differential diagnosis of the multitude of symptoms that Jesus presents with in the Bible. The guy had anger issues and that’s probably the least of his problems. He had an imaginary daddy friend in the sky who talked to him and that never goes well in the world of mental illness.



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  • LaurieB #6
    Sep 4, 2018 at 12:15 pm

    Jamie Theakston continues his exploration

    I wonder if Jamie presents a differential diagnosis of the multitude of symptoms that Jesus presents with in the Bible.

    I don’t know if you will be able to access the programme, but it was broadly objective, compared biblical narratives with such objective evidence as is available, and concluded that the was no archaeological evidence or documentary evidence for the existence of a Historical Jesus. It also made clear that the folk myths were made up by followers decades or centuries later. It also made refence to the numerous other “gospels”, and the Roman picking of the 4 for the NT Bible.
    It examined the “holy sites” and the “evidence” – or lack of it, for claims made about them as part of the “pilgrim and relic trade”!

    One historian commented, that in the time of Pilate, about 300 trouble stirring proclaimed “messiahs” had been crucified by the Romans, so such events were not out of the ordinary.



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  • Alan

    I can hardly be bothered to watch these shows though if you recommend this one then I’ll take note of it. To be honest, I just couldn’t care less if Jesus existed or not. If there was a guy named Jesus in that era that fit within the historical framework then so be it. I don’t believe he had magical powers that’s for sure and if that’s the case then what’s to even talk about?



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  • @OP – During the past decade, evangelicalism has grown more diverse: as the number of white believers has declined,

    With “faith-thinking” which lacks the checks and corrections, of evidence based science, diversity in the evolution of memes, is to be expected.

    Hence the huge present day range of “Christian” sects and cults,- all evolved from small Middle-East groups in the AD first and second century Roman empire.



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