Kavanaugh Admits He Supports Christian Prayers At Public School Events

Sep 7, 2018

By Michael Stone

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh rejects the separation of church and state and supports Christian prayers at public school events.

Kavanaugh, Trump’s nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, indicated that if confirmed as a Supreme Court Justice he would support allowing Christian prayers at public school events in a little noticed moment during day 2 of his Supreme Court confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Freedom From Religion Foundation reports that Kavanaugh expressed his support for prayer in public school in an exchange with Sen. John Cornyn during day 2 of his Supreme Court confirmation:

… in an exchange with his old buddy Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, Kavanaugh tacitly expressed his agreement that the landmark 2000 Supreme Court case, Santa Fe v. Doe, was incorrectly decided because it was hostile toward religion.

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7 comments on “Kavanaugh Admits He Supports Christian Prayers At Public School Events

  • Progressive Secular Humanist article:
    “. . . Bottom line: Kavanaugh is no friend to the Constitution, and is openly hostile to the separation of church and state. In addition, if confirmed, the Trump nominee would support Christian prayers at public school events.”

    We live in such unpredictable times. Even though Judge Kavanaugh, as the nominee to the US Supreme Court, is the most disliked by the public in US history, it remains unclear whether his nomination will fail as did those of previous publicly disliked nominees. The Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee did a very good job of bringing to light Judge Kavanaugh’s duplicity in previous hearings and in the one just concluded, and in revealing just how inimical to the US Constitution itself this nominee actually is — a veritable Roman Catholic version (much more subtle and devious than any Protestant version) of lying for Jesus. The Republican members of the US Senate may now be so amoral as to confirm the President’s nominee just to accomplish the long-sought Republican majority on the Supreme Court. The one ground for hope is that those Republican senators have to answer to the electorate in less than two months. Even religious Republican voters, who would be happy to have prayers in schools and Roe vs Wade overturned, do not seem to like this nominee. Perhaps his dishonesty, revealed to the nation and the world in the hearing just concluded and probably known to many before it, is just too deliberate and calculated and … Jesuitic … for the taste of most Americans of any religious or political persuasion. In any case, here we are, waiting to see which way the cat will jump. Will the Senators risk their political demise in order to achieve their party’s goal of controlling the US Supreme Court? Or will they decline to confirm the nominee, in the hope that they will retain their seats in November and live to vote another Republican nominee to the US Supreme Court in the future?



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  • Garrick #1
    Sep 8, 2018 at 11:30 pm

    The Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee did a very good job of bringing to light Judge Kavanaugh’s duplicity in previous hearings and in the one just concluded, and in revealing just how inimical to the US Constitution itself this nominee actually is — a veritable Roman Catholic version (much more subtle and devious than any Protestant version) of lying for Jesus.

    We should bear in mind, that when members of the Catholic establishment, speak of “Christianity” or “religion”, to fellow followers, these are code words for “Catholicism”, but made ambiguous to curry favour and support from a wider audience who they expect to tribally identify with those names!



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  • Meanwhile – back in the UK the subject of religious teaching – where teaching religion in schools with a Christian bias, has been an extensively ignored legal requirement, – is under review!

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-45451489

    Religious education in England’s schools should be renamed Religion and Worldviews to reflect the diversity of modern Britain, say experts.

    The subject should include non-religious worldviews as well as major faiths, says the Commission on Religious Education final report.

    It follows research suggesting at least a quarter of schools break the law on teaching RE.

    Without an overhaul, the subject could wither, the authors warn.

    The independent Commission was set up two years ago by the Religious Education Council of England and Wales, amid growing concerns about the quality of RE lessons.

    “RE needs rejuvenating if it is to continue to make its important contribution, indeed if it is not to wither on the vine,” says Commission Chairman, The Very Rev Dr John Hall, Dean of Westminster and a former chief education officer for the Church of England, in his foreword.

    The new subject would allow pupils to study the different traditions of major religions such as Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism but alongside these they would also look at non-religious worldviews like humanism, secularism, atheism and agnosticism.

    “Life in Britain, indeed life in our world, is very different from life in the 1970s when RE began to include other world religious and beliefs besides Christianity,” says Dr Hall.

    He believes it has never been more important for people to understand the main traditions of faith and belief and the wide variety of worldviews, and to “achieve fluency in relating to people with different traditions and outlooks from their own”.

    At present, he warns, “the quality of RE in too many schools is inadequate in enabling pupils to engage deeply with the worldviews they will encounter”.

    To counter this the commission wants the government to change the law on RE to ensure that all pupils, no matter what type of school they attend – including faith schools and academies – have full access to the proposed Religion and Worldviews curriculum.

    Schools would have to publish a detailed statement on how they achieve this and Ofsted would have the power to ensure that minimum standards are met.

    Needless to say, while the National Secular Society, and humanists saw this a an opportunity for 21st century progress, the backward dogmatists are opposed to rational and objective studies on a level playingfield!

    “This report is not so much an attempt to improve RE as to fundamentally change its character,” said the spokesman, who warned the changes risked the subject losing “all academic value and integrity” [ MMmmmm . . . “integrity” of Catholic indoctrination]

    And the Vice President of the Board of Deputies of British Jews, Edwin Shuker, said the report was “fundamentally undermined by the dilution of religious education through the inclusion of all worldviews in an already tight teaching timetable”.

    Oh dear! Children seeing the big global picture beyond their narrow sectarian cultures, with less time for narrow-minded indoctrination! 🙂

    “This might be seen as an attempt by those hostile to faith to push their agenda of undermining [indoctrination] rigour in religious education at a time when faith literacy could not be more important.”

    . . . or at least “more important” to the propagators of indoctrinated memetic delusions, who don’t want their bigotry challenged by objective studies!
    I think “faith literacy” in this context, means: blindly accepting and memorising, a narrow selection of ancient texts from folklaw!



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  • Alan4discussion #2

    We should bear in mind, that when members of the Catholic establishment, speak of “Christianity” or “religion”, to fellow followers, these are code words for “Catholicism”, …

    That is not quite the right nuance, but there is truth in what you say. Catholics do regard Catholicism (and Orthodoxy in the east) as the full version of Christianity, so in certain contexts, such as within Catholic society, the words ‘Catholicism’ and ‘Christianity’ may, but not necessarily, be used as virtual synonyms. However, Catholics are well aware that Catholicism is not and has never been the only form of Christianity; so they are as accustomed as anyone else to using the latter term as having a broader application than the former. Catholics do not use the word ‘Christianity’ as a codeword for Catholicism — they have no need for such codes. The explanation for any such impression outsiders may get of how Catholics talk about their own faith and about Christianity arises from what Catholics think about Catholicism and Reformed Christianity, as just mentioned.

    Apropos of Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings, Catholics and Protestants are quite happy to work together where their political objectives coincide. That is why we see Catholics and Evangelicals in the USA combining with frightening success to overturn decades of progress in social legislation. Certainly, in such contexts, Catholics tend to use the term ‘Christian’ to emphasize what they have in common with the Protestants they are joining forces with in order to achieve their, and Protestants, who see their version of Christianity as faithful to the original Christianity, having been purified of human and pagan accretions, are happy to use similar language for the same political purpose.

    The word ‘religion’ is so broad in meaning as not to fit into this context, though, of course, a Catholic, like a Presbyterian or a Sikh or a Hindoo, regards his religion as the one true religion.



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  • Garrick #4
    Sep 9, 2018 at 12:48 pm

    The word ‘religion’ is so broad in meaning as not to fit into this context, though, of course, a Catholic, like a Presbyterian or a Sikh or a Hindoo, regards his religion as the one true religion.

    While it may have variation between geographical locations and individuals, what I am reporting here, is what I have listened to in English Catholic “faith schools” where both priests and teachers have told children they were studying “religion” when they were reading and repeating Catholic doctrines and biblical stories. Indeed, the study of Catholic hymns and prayers, and religious assemblies, were listed as “religion” on the timetable!

    There can also be gegraphical variations in the up-bringing and training of priests!

    I have heard English Catholics criticising priests from (the wilds of) the west of Ireland, for their referring to protestants as “pagans”!



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  • 6
    Garrick says:

    Alan4discussion #5

    . . . Indeed, the study of Catholic hymns and prayers, and religious assemblies, were listed as “religion” on the timetable!

    Thanks for the clarification. Yes, of course, at a Catholic school it would be the one, true religion that was taught there — no need to specify which one. At primary school in New Zealand, I recall, the period, always the first of the day, dedicated to the teaching of the one, true faith was indeed listed as Religion! At high school, I recall it was Christian Doctrine. After my own high school days, other names came into vogue, but I cannot reliably remember them now, and I am out of touch with what goes on in Catholic primary schools.

    At #4 I may have done at least some Hindoos an injustice, for it has since come to mind that the idea of there being many paths to the divine is taught by at least some schools of thought among Hindoos.



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  • @OP – … in an exchange with his old buddy Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, Kavanaugh
    tacitly expressed his agreement that the landmark 2000 Supreme Court case,
    Santa Fe v. Doe,
    was incorrectly decided because it was hostile toward [the one and only?] religion.

    . . . . . and as we know, anyone deemed to be “hostile to [the] religion” – or its stooges, must be threatened, so that faith-thinkers can avoid critically examining their indoctrinated, delusional, tribalist, preconceptions!

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-45568450

    The woman who accuses US Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of attempting to rape her will not testify to the Senate next week, her lawyer says.

    Christine Blasey Ford’s attorney told CNN her client has been “deflecting death threats and harassment”.

    Ah! The “benefits” of investigation techniques based on “good old” lynch-mob, Republican Christian “morality”!

    Her lawyer told CNN on Tuesday night: “It’s premature to talk about a hearing on Monday because she [Prof Ford] has been dealing with the threats, the harassment and the safety of her family and that’s what she’s been focused on for the last couple of days.”

    She said that since going public with her allegation in the Washington Post on Sunday, Prof Ford has been trying to work out where her family are going to sleep at night.

    The legal team’s letter says that Prof Ford’s family has been forced to move out of their home, her email has been hacked and she has been impersonated online.

    It would seem that there is an urgent need for witness protection when dealing with “troo-believer” right-wing Christians!



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