"Facebook and Firefox" by Frydolin / CC BY-SA 3.0

They turn to Facebook and YouTube to find a cure for cancer — and get sucked into a world of bogus medicine

Jun 27, 2019

By Abby Ohlheiser

Mari pressed kale leaves through the juicer, preparing the smoothie that she believed had saved her life.

“I’m a cancer-killer, girl,” Mari told her niece, who stood next to her in the kitchen. The pair were filming themselves for a YouTube video.

Mari said she was in remission from a dangerous form of cancer, and the video was meant as a testimony to what she believed was the power of the “lemon ginger blast.” In went some cucumber, some apple, some bok choy, a whole habanero pepper.

While she pressed, she preached.

“I’m telling you, it’s anti-cancer,” Mari said. “It’ll kill your cancer cells.”

The video, first uploaded in 2016, remains on YouTube, but there’s an “important update” attached to the video’s description. It was written by Liz, the niece, a year later.

Mari’s cancer had returned, the note said, and she had died.

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